ROOSEVELT LAKE BRIDGE - GILA & MARICOPA COUNTIES, ARIZONA

The road skirts the shore of ROOSEVELT LAKE, 28 m., which on calm days, reflects the opposite sky line.
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Russell Gossett chronicles the Western landscape and sent along this striking dispatch for American Guide Week’s Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks. Quite a landmark.
Editor’s note: The Roosevelt Lake Bridge was completed in 1990. Prior to its construction, cars drove over the top of Roosevelt Dam itself. But as the dam was designed to accommodate two lanes of Model-T Fords, rather than two lanes of Ford Expeditions, the roadway needed to be widened. According to the Bureau of Reclamation, it is the “longest two-lane, single-span, steel-arch bridge in North America.”
* * *
Russell Gossett can be found on Tumblr at russmosis.tumblr.com and on Flickr at flickr.com/photos/russmosis.
Zoom Info

ROOSEVELT LAKE BRIDGE - GILA & MARICOPA COUNTIES, ARIZONA

The road skirts the shore of ROOSEVELT LAKE, 28 m., which on calm days, reflects the opposite sky line.

Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Russell Gossett chronicles the Western landscape and sent along this striking dispatch for American Guide Week’s Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks. Quite a landmark.

Editor’s note: The Roosevelt Lake Bridge was completed in 1990. Prior to its construction, cars drove over the top of Roosevelt Dam itself. But as the dam was designed to accommodate two lanes of Model-T Fords, rather than two lanes of Ford Expeditions, the roadway needed to be widened. According to the Bureau of Reclamation, it is the “longest two-lane, single-span, steel-arch bridge in North America.”

* * *

Russell Gossett can be found on Tumblr at russmosis.tumblr.com and on Flickr at flickr.com/photos/russmosis.

DESERT FLORA - ARIZONA


The popular conception of Arizona is of a barren desert country, yet the flora ranges from the subtropical to the subalpine. Strange and unusual plant types are found from mountain peak to desert floor. … Even were it not for the myriad growth of flowers, the word “desert” as applied to Arizona would be misleading, for there are always green shrubs and cacti to add color and variety tot he landscape. Arizona leads in the number and diversity of cactus plants, and while most of them grow on the desert, some are found high on the mountains, surviving low temperatures.
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Arizona is far from a barren land of rock and sand. Russell Gossett sent in this beautiful view of the landscape for American Guide Week.
* * *
Russell Gossett can be found on Tumblr at russmosis.tumblr.com and on Flickr at flickr.com/photos/russmosis.
Zoom Info

DESERT FLORA - ARIZONA

The popular conception of Arizona is of a barren desert country, yet the flora ranges from the subtropical to the subalpine. Strange and unusual plant types are found from mountain peak to desert floor. … Even were it not for the myriad growth of flowers, the word “desert” as applied to Arizona would be misleading, for there are always green shrubs and cacti to add color and variety tot he landscape. Arizona leads in the number and diversity of cactus plants, and while most of them grow on the desert, some are found high on the mountains, surviving low temperatures.

Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Arizona is far from a barren land of rock and sand. Russell Gossett sent in this beautiful view of the landscape for American Guide Week.

* * *

Russell Gossett can be found on Tumblr at russmosis.tumblr.com and on Flickr at flickr.com/photos/russmosis.

SAN PEDRO RIPARIAN NATIONAL CONSERVATION AREA - COCHISE COUNTY, ARIZONA
In addition to American Guide Week, it turns out it’s also the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area. Are you kidding us with those skies, San Pedro? From our friends over at mypubliclands comes this amazingly beautiful dispatch for Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

On November 18, 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed PL 100-696 into law, formally establishing the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area in Arizona.
The San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area contains nearly 57,000 acres of public land in Cochise County, Arizona, between the international border and St. David, Arizona. The riparian area, where some 40 miles of the upper San Pedro River meanders, is one of the most important riparian areas in the United States. The river’s stretch is home to more than 80 species of mammals, two native species and several introduced species of fish, more than 40 species of amphibians and reptiles, and 100 species of breeding birds. It also provides invaluable habitat for 250 species of migrant and wintering birds and contains archaeological sites representing the remains of human occupation from 13,000 years ago.  The area provides opportunities for wildlife viewing including birdwatching, picnicking, primitive camping, pre-historic and historic site visiting, hunting, hiking, fishing, biking, horseback riding, guided hikes, interpretive site visitation, and weekend children’s programs. 
For more information, visit http://on.doi.gov/IcYDc7 .

* * *
MyPublicLands is the official Tumblr of the Bureau of Land Management. Follow the next generation of BLMers as they share their experiences on the public lands. You can find them at mypubliclands.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN PEDRO RIPARIAN NATIONAL CONSERVATION AREA - COCHISE COUNTY, ARIZONA
In addition to American Guide Week, it turns out it’s also the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area. Are you kidding us with those skies, San Pedro? From our friends over at mypubliclands comes this amazingly beautiful dispatch for Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

On November 18, 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed PL 100-696 into law, formally establishing the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area in Arizona.
The San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area contains nearly 57,000 acres of public land in Cochise County, Arizona, between the international border and St. David, Arizona. The riparian area, where some 40 miles of the upper San Pedro River meanders, is one of the most important riparian areas in the United States. The river’s stretch is home to more than 80 species of mammals, two native species and several introduced species of fish, more than 40 species of amphibians and reptiles, and 100 species of breeding birds. It also provides invaluable habitat for 250 species of migrant and wintering birds and contains archaeological sites representing the remains of human occupation from 13,000 years ago.  The area provides opportunities for wildlife viewing including birdwatching, picnicking, primitive camping, pre-historic and historic site visiting, hunting, hiking, fishing, biking, horseback riding, guided hikes, interpretive site visitation, and weekend children’s programs. 
For more information, visit http://on.doi.gov/IcYDc7 .

* * *
MyPublicLands is the official Tumblr of the Bureau of Land Management. Follow the next generation of BLMers as they share their experiences on the public lands. You can find them at mypubliclands.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN PEDRO RIPARIAN NATIONAL CONSERVATION AREA - COCHISE COUNTY, ARIZONA
In addition to American Guide Week, it turns out it’s also the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area. Are you kidding us with those skies, San Pedro? From our friends over at mypubliclands comes this amazingly beautiful dispatch for Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

On November 18, 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed PL 100-696 into law, formally establishing the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area in Arizona.
The San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area contains nearly 57,000 acres of public land in Cochise County, Arizona, between the international border and St. David, Arizona. The riparian area, where some 40 miles of the upper San Pedro River meanders, is one of the most important riparian areas in the United States. The river’s stretch is home to more than 80 species of mammals, two native species and several introduced species of fish, more than 40 species of amphibians and reptiles, and 100 species of breeding birds. It also provides invaluable habitat for 250 species of migrant and wintering birds and contains archaeological sites representing the remains of human occupation from 13,000 years ago.  The area provides opportunities for wildlife viewing including birdwatching, picnicking, primitive camping, pre-historic and historic site visiting, hunting, hiking, fishing, biking, horseback riding, guided hikes, interpretive site visitation, and weekend children’s programs. 
For more information, visit http://on.doi.gov/IcYDc7 .

* * *
MyPublicLands is the official Tumblr of the Bureau of Land Management. Follow the next generation of BLMers as they share their experiences on the public lands. You can find them at mypubliclands.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SAN PEDRO RIPARIAN NATIONAL CONSERVATION AREA - COCHISE COUNTY, ARIZONA

In addition to American Guide Week, it turns out it’s also the 25th anniversary of the establishment of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area. Are you kidding us with those skies, San Pedro? From our friends over at mypubliclands comes this amazingly beautiful dispatch for Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

On November 18, 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed PL 100-696 into law, formally establishing the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area in Arizona.

The San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area contains nearly 57,000 acres of public land in Cochise County, Arizona, between the international border and St. David, Arizona. The riparian area, where some 40 miles of the upper San Pedro River meanders, is one of the most important riparian areas in the United States. The river’s stretch is home to more than 80 species of mammals, two native species and several introduced species of fish, more than 40 species of amphibians and reptiles, and 100 species of breeding birds. It also provides invaluable habitat for 250 species of migrant and wintering birds and contains archaeological sites representing the remains of human occupation from 13,000 years ago.  The area provides opportunities for wildlife viewing including birdwatching, picnicking, primitive camping, pre-historic and historic site visiting, hunting, hiking, fishing, biking, horseback riding, guided hikes, interpretive site visitation, and weekend children’s programs. 

For more information, visit http://on.doi.gov/IcYDc7 .

* * *

MyPublicLands is the official Tumblr of the Bureau of Land Management. Follow the next generation of BLMers as they share their experiences on the public lands. You can find them at mypubliclands.tumblr.com.

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION

The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.  

Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.

Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.” 

Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks.

Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *

THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   

PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 
Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.
Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.
Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes: 
Petrified Forest Shrinks, One Stolen Piece at a Time (New York Times).
Petrified Forest National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 
Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.
Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.
Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes: 
Petrified Forest Shrinks, One Stolen Piece at a Time (New York Times).
Petrified Forest National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 
Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.
Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.
Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes: 
Petrified Forest Shrinks, One Stolen Piece at a Time (New York Times).
Petrified Forest National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 
Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.
Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.
Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes: 
Petrified Forest Shrinks, One Stolen Piece at a Time (New York Times).
Petrified Forest National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 
Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.
Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.
Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes: 
Petrified Forest Shrinks, One Stolen Piece at a Time (New York Times).
Petrified Forest National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 
Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.
Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.
Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes: 
Petrified Forest Shrinks, One Stolen Piece at a Time (New York Times).
Petrified Forest National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 
Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.
Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.
Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes: 
Petrified Forest Shrinks, One Stolen Piece at a Time (New York Times).
Petrified Forest National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 
Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.
Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.
Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes: 
Petrified Forest Shrinks, One Stolen Piece at a Time (New York Times).
Petrified Forest National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 
Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.
Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.
Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”
—Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes: 
Petrified Forest Shrinks, One Stolen Piece at a Time (New York Times).
Petrified Forest National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

PETRIFIED FOREST - NORTHERN ARIZONA 

Due to the theft of petrified wood chunks by visitors the process of entering (and exiting) Petrified Forest National Park feels like a cross between an episode of A&E’s Beyond Scared Straight and a TSA security screening. But once you get past the gates, the hassles fades away and you find yourself under the giant blue sky, staring into the seemingly endless Painted Desert.

Petrified Forest was designated as a National Monument in 1906, after Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act of that year. Arizona would not become a state until six years later and Petrified Forest would not become a National Park until 1962.

Just over 600,000 visitors a year come to see the 146 square miles (380 km2) of surprisingly varied desert. Entering the park, you are greeted by scrubby pale desert that soon gives way to the reds and pinks of the Chinle formation that makes up the gorgeous Painted Desert. As you continue down the park’s main road the land changes and you encounter wide grasslands, classic badlands, canyons, Pueblo ruins, petroglyphs, part of the fabled Route 66 and finally the remains of ancient petrified forests.

“The Painted Desert extends for 300 miles along the north bank of the Little Colorado-a stretch of vividly banded earth beneath a brilliant sky; at times even the air above this lonely land glows with a pink mist or a purple haze.  Eons of rain and wind have exposed the highly-colored shales, marls, and sandstones. Warm, almost unreal tints waver across the sands, dance along the mesa tops, stain the lomas and ledges, and splash scarlet hues for horizon to horizon.”

Arizona, A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA
National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013
There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.
With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA
National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013
There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.
With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA
National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013
There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.
With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA
National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013
There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.
With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA
National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013
There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.
With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA
National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013
There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.
With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA
National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013
There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.
With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA
National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013
There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.
With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA
National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013
There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.
With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

SUNRISE TO SUNSET AT GRAND CANYON - ARIZONA

National Park Week - April 20-28, 2013

There is no better place to accidentally find yourself during the National Park Service’s free week than the second most visited park, Grand Canyon.

With nearly 5 million visitors a year, Grand Canyon is as good for its people watching as it is for the view itself.  You can go a long time without hearing a single word of English, but easily make out that everyone has the same mix of marvel and disbelief as they walk up the trail to Mather Point and catch their first glimpse of the South Rim.

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.

Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: National Park Week occurs each spring.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to atinlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 

The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.  

Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.

Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.” 

Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks.

Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

PETRIFIED
When you’re driving on highway I-40 East in Arizona, follow the signs to Stewarts Petrified Wood in Holbrook. 
Remember… Stewarts—where any purchase gets you a free four inch polished petrified wood slice. They sell Triassic Era bookends, slabs, stumps and jewelry. Dinosaur bones, too. And, a new item: ostriches and ostrich eggs.
Vanessa and Nick from shotonthespot took a look-see for themselves:





Down at Stewarts Petrified Wood you can feed the ostriches and look at mannequins posed in weird positions being eaten by dinos don’t cha know?  
I’m sure the owners are rather kooky but we didn’t think it’d be wise to stick around and find out.





* * *
Find Vanessa and Nick on Tumblr at shotonthespot and see the Southwest as they see it in realtime. 
Zoom Info
PETRIFIED
When you’re driving on highway I-40 East in Arizona, follow the signs to Stewarts Petrified Wood in Holbrook. 
Remember… Stewarts—where any purchase gets you a free four inch polished petrified wood slice. They sell Triassic Era bookends, slabs, stumps and jewelry. Dinosaur bones, too. And, a new item: ostriches and ostrich eggs.
Vanessa and Nick from shotonthespot took a look-see for themselves:





Down at Stewarts Petrified Wood you can feed the ostriches and look at mannequins posed in weird positions being eaten by dinos don’t cha know?  
I’m sure the owners are rather kooky but we didn’t think it’d be wise to stick around and find out.





* * *
Find Vanessa and Nick on Tumblr at shotonthespot and see the Southwest as they see it in realtime. 
Zoom Info

PETRIFIED

When you’re driving on highway I-40 East in Arizona, follow the signs to Stewarts Petrified Wood in Holbrook. 

Remember… Stewarts—where any purchase gets you a free four inch polished petrified wood slice. They sell Triassic Era bookends, slabs, stumps and jewelry. Dinosaur bones, too. And, a new item: ostriches and ostrich eggs.

Vanessa and Nick from shotonthespot took a look-see for themselves:

Down at Stewarts Petrified Wood you can feed the ostriches and look at mannequins posed in weird positions being eaten by dinos don’t cha know?  

I’m sure the owners are rather kooky but we didn’t think it’d be wise to stick around and find out.

* * *

Find Vanessa and Nick on Tumblr at shotonthespot and see the Southwest as they see it in realtime. 

The roadside splendor of Mesa, Arizona’s Buckhorn Baths Motel could have been relinquished to strip mall sprawl, but Jason P. Woodbury sends word of its provisional salvation: Mesa residents resoundingly approved a bond measure allowing the city to purchase the property for historic preservation. The actual sale remains subject to negotiation.
Prior to the vote, Gary Nelson of the AZ Republic penned an eloquent homage to Buckhorn Baths’ history…






Now virtually frozen in time on the northwest corner of Main Street and Recker Road, Buckhorn was for generations a glowing beacon in the desert, tapping rich veins of the national psyche.






Read Nelson’s full article here to discover how Buckhorn brought Major League Baseball to Arizona and follow Jason on Tumblr at jasonpwoodbury.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
The roadside splendor of Mesa, Arizona’s Buckhorn Baths Motel could have been relinquished to strip mall sprawl, but Jason P. Woodbury sends word of its provisional salvation: Mesa residents resoundingly approved a bond measure allowing the city to purchase the property for historic preservation. The actual sale remains subject to negotiation.
Prior to the vote, Gary Nelson of the AZ Republic penned an eloquent homage to Buckhorn Baths’ history…






Now virtually frozen in time on the northwest corner of Main Street and Recker Road, Buckhorn was for generations a glowing beacon in the desert, tapping rich veins of the national psyche.






Read Nelson’s full article here to discover how Buckhorn brought Major League Baseball to Arizona and follow Jason on Tumblr at jasonpwoodbury.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

The roadside splendor of Mesa, Arizona’s Buckhorn Baths Motel could have been relinquished to strip mall sprawl, but Jason P. Woodbury sends word of its provisional salvation: Mesa residents resoundingly approved a bond measure allowing the city to purchase the property for historic preservation. The actual sale remains subject to negotiation.

Prior to the vote, Gary Nelson of the AZ Republic penned an eloquent homage to Buckhorn Baths’ history…

Now virtually frozen in time on the northwest corner of Main Street and Recker Road, Buckhorn was for generations a glowing beacon in the desert, tapping rich veins of the national psyche.

Read Nelson’s full article here to discover how Buckhorn brought Major League Baseball to Arizona and follow Jason on Tumblr at jasonpwoodbury.tumblr.com.

A guide to Wickenburg, Arizona using Arizona, the Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940) as your map.

Wickenburg sits at the confluence of highways 60, 89, and 93 in central Arizona. If you want to get to and from Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Phoenix or a few smaller cities, you will find yourself in the town on the Hassayampa River.

This is not an accident.

German immigrant Henry Wickenburg discovered “The Vulture” gold mine 149 years ago, just 14 miles from the town that was quickly named for him. Soon swarmed with miners and merchants, Wickenburg was a transportation hub when the stagecoach was considered a comfortable way to get around.

But what really put Wickenburg on the map was a phenomenon that gave the town its most well-known nickname in the 1930s: “Dude Ranch Capital of the World.” Non- westerners who wanted a cowboy vacation came to places like Wickenburg to dress in denim, ride horses, sing around the campfire, and pretend they were in a Gary Cooper movie.

As the WPA Guide put it so colorfully, “Dude ranches, open here the year round, combine the rudeness of corrals and stables with modern hotel luxury.”

The past and present are layered together in today’s Wickenburg. You can still stay at a dude ranch, and you can take in modern art at the Desert Caballeros Western Museum. Saguaro cacti beckon just outside of town. Circle the roundabout in the city center and take in the life-sized bronzes reminiscent of Remington.

But don’t worry about that Gila Monster or rattlesnake you see on city sidewalks. They’re bronzes too, just a reminder that the Wild West still lives.

* * *

Lynn Downey is an At-large Guide to the West for The American Guide. She’s a writer and archivist based in Sonoma, California. See her latest book, Wickenburg: Images of America.