AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FIELD REPORTS, ASSIGNMENT #4

Take Pride, It’s the American Guide

YOUR ASSIGNMENT, TRUSTED GUIDE:

The original American Guide series of books was produced by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration in the 1930s and ’40s. Your A/G editors unearthed the actual mimeographed field manual from 1935 that was sent out to each WPA state research office. Editors, researchers, and volunteers used the manual as a basis for collecting information on their district.

We’re asking you to do the same. Stay tuned all this week as we release 10 assignments drawn from the 1935 manual for the upcoming American Guide Week (Nov. 18-24). Use these questions as your guide for contributing #AmericanGuideWeek content. For your fourth assignment, Class III - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs. (And yes, these are actual questions from the manual.)  

CLASS III - FOLK FESTIVALS, PAGEANTS, CELEBRATIONS, and CUSTOMS

  • Are there any famous food specialties in your district? Where and how dispensed?
  • Describe any local folk festivals or celebrations of annual or periodic recurrence (such as Tilting Tournaments in Virginia).
  • Are there survivals of barn dancing, square dances, peculiar wedding or other ceremonies?
  • Are there annual festivals? (Ex. Carnival, New Orleans. Fiesta week, Santa Fe rodeos.)

Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photosillustrations and writing that answer these questions and describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things.

Check out some past A/G posts on food, festivals, pageants, and celebrations. Now go out there and describe/photograph/draw what it’s like where you live. 

This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.

#americanguideweek

Check out A/G Week assignments here.

AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FIELD REPORTS, ASSIGNMENT #2

Take Pride, It’s the American Guide

YOUR ASSIGNMENT, TRUSTED GUIDE:

The original American Guide series of books was produced by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration in the 1930s and ’40s. Your A/G editors unearthed the actual mimeographed field manual from 1935 that was sent out to each WPA state research office. Editors, researchers, and volunteers used the manual as a basis for collecting information on their district.

We’re asking you to do the same. Stay tuned all this week as we release 10 assignments drawn from the 1935 manual for the upcoming American Guide Week (Nov. 18-24). Use these questions as your guide for contributing #AmericanGuideWeek content. For your second assignment, Class I - Flora and Fauna. (And yes, these are actual questions from the manual.)  

CLASS I - FLORA and FAUNA

  • Are there places to which one may drive or hike where some special variety [of plant] blooms at a certain time?
  • List plants and trees common to your district.
  • Are there trees of historical interest?
  • List animals, birds, fish native to your district.
  • Are there dangerous animals?
  • Are there interesting animal colonies such as colonies of beavers or prairie dog cities in your district?

BE A GUIDE. SHOW AMERICA TO AMERICANS. 

Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photosillustrations and writing that answer these questions and describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things.

Check out a couple of past A/G posts on flora (or fungi, in this case) and fauna. Now go out there and describe/photograph/draw what it’s like where you live. 

This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.

#americanguideweek

Check out A/G Week assignments here.

AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FIELD REPORTS, ASSIGNMENT #1

Take Pride, It’s the American Guide

YOUR ASSIGNMENT, TRUSTED GUIDE:

The original American Guide series of books was produced by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration in the 1930s and ’40s. Your A/G editors unearthed the actual mimeographed field manual from 1935 that was sent out to each WPA state research office. Editors, researchers, and volunteers used the manual as a basis for collecting information on their district.

We’re asking you to do the same. Stay tuned all this week as we release 10 assignments drawn from the 1935 manual for the upcoming American Guide Week (Nov. 18-24). Use these questions as your guide for contributing #AmericanGuideWeek content. First up, Class I - Topography and Climate.  

CLASS I - TOPOGRAPHY and CLIMATE

  • Is your district flat, rolling, mountainous?
  • Is the district arid, semi-arid, fertile? (Nature of the soil, color of the soil, Rain fall, Water shed.)
  • Furnish information on the following subjects: Weather conditions; Climatic idiosyncrasies; Natural phenomena, such as natural bridges, ice caves, cliffs, or ravines; General geologic structure.

BE A GUIDE. SHOW AMERICA TO AMERICANS. 

Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photos, illustrations and writing that answer these questions and describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things.

Check out a couple of past A/G posts on topography and climate. Now go out there and describe/photograph/draw what it’s like where you live. 

This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.

#americanguideweek

Check out A/G Week assignments here.

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Illustration by Guide to the West, James Orndorf - www.roughshelter.com

AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FIELD REPORTS, ASSIGNMENT #1

Take Pride, It’s the American Guide

YOUR ASSIGNMENT, TRUSTED GUIDE:

The original American Guide series of books was produced by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration in the 1930s and ’40s. Your A/G editors unearthed the actual mimeographed field manual from 1935 that was sent out to each WPA state research office. Editors, researchers, and volunteers used the manual as a basis for collecting information on their district.

We’re asking you to do the same. Stay tuned all this week as we release 10 assignments drawn from the 1935 manual for the upcoming American Guide Week (Nov. 18-24). Use these questions as your guide for contributing #AmericanGuideWeek content. First up, Class I - Topography and Climate.  

CLASS I - TOPOGRAPHY and CLIMATE

  • Is your district flat, rolling, mountainous?
  • Is the district arid, semi-arid, fertile? (Nature of the soil, color of the soil, Rain fall, Water shed.)
  • Furnish information on the following subjects: Weather conditions; Climatic idiosyncrasies; Natural phenomena, such as natural bridges, ice caves, cliffs, or ravines; General geologic structure.

BE A GUIDE. SHOW AMERICA TO AMERICANS. 

Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photos,illustrations and writing that answer these questions and describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things.

Check out a couple of past A/G posts on topography and climate. Now go out there and describe/photograph/draw what it’s like where you live. 

This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.

#americanguideweek

Check out A/G Week assignments here.

* * *

Illustration by Guide to the West, James Orndorf - www.roughshelter.com

FOURTH OF JULY, USA

The village…has not forgotten how to celebrate the Fourth of July in the old-time way. Early on the morning of the holiday, a crowd gathers from the hills as if by magic: old folk who remember when the big lumber mills operated and there was an abundance of money; young people who know only that the land has been washing away ever since the mills “cut out,” and that the crops are poor; and, of course, a speaker who addresses the milling crowd from a flag-draped platform. The speaker knows that his listeners believe emphatically, as did their fathers before them, in democracy and individualism, and it is of these he talks. After the speech, there is a barbecue, at which everyone helps himself to anything he wants. The women visit, discussing rural news or exchanging recipes, and the men engage in hog-calling contests and horse-shoe tournaments. The boys try to win the admiration of the girls by climbing a larded pole or catching a greased pig.

Missouri, A Guide To the Show Me State (WPA, 1941)

In the afterglow of the fireworks, we here at A/G HQ are wiping our hands from the larded pole and greased pig contests and wanted to share a big thanks to all the folks who are our Guides to the US of A. We are constantly amazed, astounded, and awestricken by their work and feel privileged to be able to share it with our audience. (Audience, we hope you’re following each and every one of their respective Tumblrs. Seriously, get on that.)

Above—Independence Day through the lenses of some of our A/G guides (from top to bottom, left to right):

Tammy Mercure 

Amadee Ricketts 

Jon Creamer 

Brandon Getty

Stephen Dyer

Tara Wray

James Orndorf

KC O’Connor

Jordan Smith

Ken Kornacki

You can find the rest of our unbelievably fantastic Guides and their respective Tumblrs, Flickr pages and various other websites on our Guides pageLearn how to be a guide yourself here.

STEARNS COUNTY, MINNESOTA

ST. CLOUD (alt. 1,032; pop. 21,000), on the Mississippi River, which forms the eastern boundary of Stearns County, is the county seat and trade center for a large agricultural area that extends in all directions…In other parts of the country, St. Cloud’s importance rests on its numerous quarries, the stones of which have been used since the 1870’s by builders and architects throughout the United States for many of their most noteworthy structures.

— Minnesota, A State Guide (WPA, 1938)
Artist and Guide to Minnesota Nate Burbeck scouts around the country, shooting panoramic images to use as the basis of his paintings. Yesterday, we posted part one of his dispatch — the photos from his latest reconnoiter. Today, Nate provides images of the process and results:
Stearns County, Minn., Oil on Canvas, 24x50 inches, 2013.
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Nate Burbeck is a State Guide to Minnesota and an At-Large Guide to the Midwest. He curates a few regionally-themed art tumblrs — beyond 9th avenue (Northeastern artists), fly over art (Midwestern artists) and in the new frontier (Western artists) and has himself been named one of “Ten Artists to Watch in 2013” on the Walker Art Center’s mnartists blog. Follow Nate’s work on Tumblr at nburbeck.tumblr.com or on his website.
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STEARNS COUNTY, MINNESOTA

ST. CLOUD (alt. 1,032; pop. 21,000), on the Mississippi River, which forms the eastern boundary of Stearns County, is the county seat and trade center for a large agricultural area that extends in all directions…In other parts of the country, St. Cloud’s importance rests on its numerous quarries, the stones of which have been used since the 1870’s by builders and architects throughout the United States for many of their most noteworthy structures.

— Minnesota, A State Guide (WPA, 1938)

Artist and Guide to Minnesota Nate Burbeck scouts around the country, shooting panoramic images to use as the basis of his paintings. Yesterday, we posted part one of his dispatch — the photos from his latest reconnoiter. Today, Nate provides images of the process and results:

Stearns County, Minn., Oil on Canvas, 24x50 inches, 2013.

* * *

Nate Burbeck is a State Guide to Minnesota and an At-Large Guide to the Midwest. He curates a few regionally-themed art tumblrs — beyond 9th avenue (Northeastern artists), fly over art (Midwestern artists) and in the new frontier (Western artists) and has himself been named one of “Ten Artists to Watch in 2013” on the Walker Art Center’s mnartists blog. Follow Nate’s work on Tumblr at nburbeck.tumblr.com or on his website.

WHITE BEAR LAKE / STEARNS COUNTY, MINNESOTA

WHITE BEAR LAKE, 142.9 m. (941 alt., 2,600 pop.), is a resort town favored by St. Paulites. Indians believed that the lake, whose shores are lined with summer homes, was haunted by the spirit of a white bear, slain by a brave as it was about to attack his beloved.

— Minnesota, A State Guide (WPA, 1938)

Artist and Guide to Minnesota Nate Burbeck scouts around the country, shooting panoramic images to use as the basis of his paintings. We’ll be bringing you another post with the results of this expedition, but for now, part one of his dispatch:

The first cluster of photos I took was in White Bear Lake, Minn., a northern, “inner-ring” suburb of St. Paul that I suppose I would categorize as older (post-War housing boom), with maybe even slightly blue-collar type of neighborhoods — at least when compared to some of the further out, newer exurbs I’ve photographed before. 

A few weeks later I drove up I-94 to Stearns County, Minn., to take pictures of a small cluster of houses just outside the St. Joseph/St. Cloud area. This part of Central Minnesota (and Stearns County in particular) is considered by many to be one of the more politically conservative areas in the state. I even saw a yellow “Don’t Tread on Me” flag flying on a pole in one of the neighboring yards (not pictured here). Though still mostly rural, the area’s been steadily growing as more people have flocked to commuter towns spilling out of the Twin Cities Metro. The housing sites I photographed here worked very well and thankfully the weather was nice and gloomy — just what I was hoping for. It’s a lot more open than the more established suburb of White Bear Lake, and the house/backyard I ended up using for my painting is right next to unused wooded areas and small-scale farmland that surrounds it.

* * *

Nate Burbeck is a State Guide to Minnesota and an At-Large Guide to the Midwest. he curates a few regionally-themed art tumblrs — beyond 9th avenue (Northeastern artists), fly over art (Midwestern artists) and in the new frontier (Western artists) and has himself been named one of “Ten Artists to Watch in 2013" on the Walker Art Center’s mnartists blog. Follow Nate’s work on Tumblr at nburbeck.tumblr.com or on his website.

WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)
Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.
Zoom Info
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)
Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.
Zoom Info
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)
Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.
Zoom Info
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)
Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.
Zoom Info
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)
Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.
Zoom Info
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)
Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.
Zoom Info
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)
Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.
Zoom Info
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)
Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.
Zoom Info
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)
Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.
Zoom Info

WARREN, RHODE ISLAND (PART ONE)

Warren is one of the smallest towns in the smallest state. Sitting on a peninsula between two rivers and a ton of salt marshes, it’s about ten miles up Narragansett Bay off the open water. It was a whaling town for a while, but historically, has always been a center for ship building and marine support industries, which is extremely evident everywhere you look in town. All the yards have boats in them, and behind all the houses on the west side of Water Street dozens of ship yards, repair shops, dry docks, etc, are jammed between the houses and the saltwater. It’s a pretty awesome town. It’s definitely stuck in time. 

* * *

Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born in raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works out of a sea shanty on Narragansett Bay. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr at michaelcevoli or on his website, MichaelCevoli.com.

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

Our friend at milwaukier-than-thou shares scenes of discarded or disregarded locations around Milwaukee by artist Sarah Luther. 

From the exhibition catalog of a recent gallery show

Luther has spent the past year exploring hundreds of abandoned plots, eventually selecting five pieces of land for their particular feel, interest, or beauty. She then memorialized each plot in a field guide. The guides ponder the land’s history, surrounding neighborhood, points of interest or curiosity—and then ask how each plot could be transformed into a public space.

Luther’s work seeks to appreciate and explore the often overlooked everyday scenes of the city. We like that idea. For more on Luther, and images of her micro-guides, check out this profile from Urban Milwaukee.

A WORKER READS HISTORY
Who built the Model T?The books are filled with the names of flivver kings.Was it the kings who hauled the engine blocks and turned the dies?Who built the city up? In which of Detroit’s housesLived those who built it?In the evening when Grand Boulevard was finishedWhere did the masons go? New CenterIs built upon vaulted domes. Who reared them up? Over whomDid the Captians of Industry rule? The Roaring Twenties live in song,Was everyone a flapper? And even in 1929The night the market crashed, didn’t The money brokers still bellow for their servants?
-With thanks to Bertlot Brecht
Credit: Union Town A Labor History Guide to DetroitWritten by: Steve Babson and Dave ElsilaCopyright, Workers Education Local 189, Michigan Chapter
* * *
#AmericanGuideWeek dispatch from the Motor City, care of Detroit Maintenance Man, Jonathan Miller. His drawings, mixed media art, and photographs are well worth your time. You can find his handiwork on Tumblr or his website, DetroitMaintenance.blogspot.com.
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A WORKER READS HISTORY
Who built the Model T?The books are filled with the names of flivver kings.Was it the kings who hauled the engine blocks and turned the dies?Who built the city up? In which of Detroit’s housesLived those who built it?In the evening when Grand Boulevard was finishedWhere did the masons go? New CenterIs built upon vaulted domes. Who reared them up? Over whomDid the Captians of Industry rule? The Roaring Twenties live in song,Was everyone a flapper? And even in 1929The night the market crashed, didn’t The money brokers still bellow for their servants?
-With thanks to Bertlot Brecht
Credit: Union Town A Labor History Guide to DetroitWritten by: Steve Babson and Dave ElsilaCopyright, Workers Education Local 189, Michigan Chapter
* * *
#AmericanGuideWeek dispatch from the Motor City, care of Detroit Maintenance Man, Jonathan Miller. His drawings, mixed media art, and photographs are well worth your time. You can find his handiwork on Tumblr or his website, DetroitMaintenance.blogspot.com.
Zoom Info
A WORKER READS HISTORY
Who built the Model T?The books are filled with the names of flivver kings.Was it the kings who hauled the engine blocks and turned the dies?Who built the city up? In which of Detroit’s housesLived those who built it?In the evening when Grand Boulevard was finishedWhere did the masons go? New CenterIs built upon vaulted domes. Who reared them up? Over whomDid the Captians of Industry rule? The Roaring Twenties live in song,Was everyone a flapper? And even in 1929The night the market crashed, didn’t The money brokers still bellow for their servants?
-With thanks to Bertlot Brecht
Credit: Union Town A Labor History Guide to DetroitWritten by: Steve Babson and Dave ElsilaCopyright, Workers Education Local 189, Michigan Chapter
* * *
#AmericanGuideWeek dispatch from the Motor City, care of Detroit Maintenance Man, Jonathan Miller. His drawings, mixed media art, and photographs are well worth your time. You can find his handiwork on Tumblr or his website, DetroitMaintenance.blogspot.com.
Zoom Info
A WORKER READS HISTORY
Who built the Model T?The books are filled with the names of flivver kings.Was it the kings who hauled the engine blocks and turned the dies?Who built the city up? In which of Detroit’s housesLived those who built it?In the evening when Grand Boulevard was finishedWhere did the masons go? New CenterIs built upon vaulted domes. Who reared them up? Over whomDid the Captians of Industry rule? The Roaring Twenties live in song,Was everyone a flapper? And even in 1929The night the market crashed, didn’t The money brokers still bellow for their servants?
-With thanks to Bertlot Brecht
Credit: Union Town A Labor History Guide to DetroitWritten by: Steve Babson and Dave ElsilaCopyright, Workers Education Local 189, Michigan Chapter
* * *
#AmericanGuideWeek dispatch from the Motor City, care of Detroit Maintenance Man, Jonathan Miller. His drawings, mixed media art, and photographs are well worth your time. You can find his handiwork on Tumblr or his website, DetroitMaintenance.blogspot.com.
Zoom Info

A WORKER READS HISTORY

Who built the Model T?
The books are filled with the names of flivver kings.
Was it the kings who hauled the engine blocks and turned the dies?
Who built the city up? In which of Detroit’s houses
Lived those who built it?
In the evening when Grand Boulevard was finished
Where did the masons go? New Center
Is built upon vaulted domes. Who reared them up? Over whom
Did the Captians of Industry rule? The Roaring Twenties live in song,
Was everyone a flapper? And even in 1929
The night the market crashed, didn’t 
The money brokers still bellow for their servants?

-With thanks to Bertlot Brecht

Credit: Union Town A Labor History Guide to Detroit
Written by: Steve Babson and Dave Elsila
Copyright, Workers Education Local 189, Michigan Chapter

* * *

#AmericanGuideWeek dispatch from the Motor City, care of Detroit Maintenance Man, Jonathan Miller. His drawings, mixed media art, and photographs are well worth your time. You can find his handiwork on Tumblr or his website, DetroitMaintenance.blogspot.com.