RURAL NORTH CAROLINA

Hard-working, hard-headed men, with no foreknowledge of the inevitable change in relationship from money and land to money and machinery, attached themselves and their region to the change.

North Carolina, A Guide To the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Growing up in the Northeast, and being a photographer, my impressions of the South came largely through looking at photographs. So I was cognizant of the history of photography in this region—the work of the Farm Security Administration photographers, for example—when I moved to North Carolina from New Jersey in 1989.

I soon began exploring with my cameras, drawn to those places that are off the beaten track, neglected or abandoned.

By 2008, North Carolina was the third-fastest-growing state in the United States and the fastest-growing state east of the Mississippi River, and it was losing some of its distinctive characteristics. I’d become an unwitting witness to an inevitable transition.

I have now photographed in more than 365 cities, towns and small rural communities across the Tar Heel State—from Aberdeen to Zebulon, from the mountains to the coast—motivated by the dedication of my predecessors and by the affection I feel for my new home. Although my aim is to make good pictures, a local reviewer perceived a bigger picture when she wrote: “David Simonton records for us the old North Carolina at its moment of passing.”

* * *

David Simonton is a Raleigh-based photographer. His North Carolina photographs are in the collections of the George Eastman House, North Carolina Museum of Art, Asheville Art Museum and the Do Good Fund: Southern Photography Initiative. Find him on the web at www.davidsimonton.com and follow him on Tumblr at davidsimonton.tumblr.com.

ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.

Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors the
idea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 

That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.

* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

LOCAL FLORA - PORTLAND, OREGON 

The woods of Oregon are a wonderland of overwhelming proportions. The eye, always drawn to the distant snow-capped peaks, sweeps over magnificent verdant blankets that cover the lower hills and spread back in tiers over higher hills and far up the mountainsides. From the heights, the forest far below is an undulating layer of dark green, sparkling with gem-like lakes and silvery streams, which stretches far off into a horizon serrated with the silhouette of distant trees. 

Oregon: End of the Trail (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes:

1: Basil, Late Summer, Portland, OR.

2: Smoke Bush, Portland, OR.

3: Grasses, Portland, OR.

4: Houseplant, Portland, OR.

5: Japanese Maple, Autumn, Portland, OR. 

6: Weeds along the Columbia River, Portland, OR.

7: Trees along the Columbia, Portland, OR.

8: Branches, Portland, OR. 

9: Grasses, Sauvie Island, OR.

10: Tree, Vines and Fence, Portland, OR. 

All Images © Robert Pallesen, All Rights Reserved.

* * *

Robert Pallesen is a fine art photographer currently living in Portland, OR. Pallesen’s work investigates the transient nature of the landscape and our relationship with it. His photographs are featured in the Humble Arts Foundation Collector’s Guide to Emerging Art Photography as well as Various Photographs, published by TV books. Pallesen’s work has been exhibited at Pushdot Studios, Newspace Center of Photography, San Francisco Camerawork, The New York Photo Festival, Pierro Gallery and CGR gallery in New York. His work is currently on view at The BlueSky Gallery in Portland as part of the Northwest Drawers program.

You can view more work by Robert Pallesen at his website and blog.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi. Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi. Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi. Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi.

Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.


* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.
Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.
—Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info

MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

The MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE, a massive double-decked bascule structure, spans the Chicago River between the sites of Chicago’s earliest settlements—that of Fort Dearborn on the South bank and of its first houses, four log cabins, on the north bank. Until the bridge was built in 1920, Michigan Avenue north of the river was a narrow lane lined with old-fashioned mansions. All but one of the old houses on the west side of the Avenue were removed when it was widened; a few remain on the east side, overshadowed by modern buildings. The bridge replaced the old Rush Street span, and until the Outer Drive bridge was opened in 1937, carried the major traffic stream between the North Side and the downtown district.

Bas reliefs adorn the four bridge pylons. The Pioneers and The Discoverers, at the north end, are by J. E. Fraser; at the south end are Defense and Regeneration, symbolizing Chicago’s recovery from the Great Fire, by Henry Hering. At the memorial services commemorating the 300th birthday of Father Marquette in May, 1937, nine years after the erection of The Discoverers, it was noted that the figure of Marquette, a Jesuit, was wearing Franciscan robes.

Illinois, A Descriptive and Historical Guide (WPA, 1939)

* * *

Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.

OCALA, FLORIDA

When I think of Ocala, Florida two things come to mind: thoroughbred horses (Ocala is one of the major thoroughbred centers in the world) and John Travolta (he has a home there, complete with a 747 air strip). Now, given that there are no photographs of horses or Mr. Travolta, I’m questioning the practicality of my Ocala guide; however, what I do experience every time I take the trip up there from South Florida is a beautiful, traditionally southern topography. Located in Marion County, the northernmost county in central Florida, Ocala is where the old southern oaks begin to give way to the tropical palms.

To be honest, I don’t know much about the history of Ocala besides what I just read on its Wikipedia page, but I’ve been taking the trip up there twice a year for the past five years and it’s always a welcome break from the resort-filled beaches of South Florida. It’s a pretty rural area, although the town seems to be sprawling more and more every year. I think I even saw a Chipotle when I was up there this past October.

Ocala’s downtown is quaint and comfortable—what you’d expect from an old Southern town. Around the outskirts of the city is where I like to go. Old motels, service stations, drive-in theaters, and the Ocala National Forest line much of the area’s highways. The rural landscapes of the Ocala National Forest could be explored for weeks. The mildly hilly terrain is covered by dense pine forests and you’re liable to come across an orange grove, or a local farmer selling fruit or boiled peanuts out the back of their old Chevy. The rivers, lakes and natural springs scattered throughout the forest make for an oasis during the hot summer months. 

Maybe next time I take the trip to Ocala, I’ll try to arrange a flight with Mr. Travolta and mingle with the thoroughbred elite, but I have a feeling I’ll keep revisiting those old country roads.

* * *

Brian McSwain was born and raised in New Orleans, but currently resides in South Florida. While a psychology graduate student, he spends the time he should be using to study on photography. Find him on Tumblr at brianmcswainphotographs.tumblr.com, follow him on Instagram and see his work on Flickr.

DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART - DALLAS, TEXAS

As mighty herds of longhorns went up the cattle trails, wealth came in, and there were strivings for culture such as theretofore had not been possible.
—Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)


The Dallas Museum of Art was first organized in 1903 as the Dallas Art Association. The year before, an exhibition was held in the Public Library’s gallery to raise money for a permanent collection. The admission charge was twenty-five cents. In a rare example of prices falling since the early 20th century, general admission to the Dallas Museum of Art is now free. 
Today, the collection includes more than 22,000 works and attracts more than half a million visitors each year. For more information, visit www.dallasmuseumofart.org.
Hours of admission: Tues and Wed - 11am-5pm; Thurs - 11am-9pm; Fri-Sun - 11am-5pm. (The third Friday of the month, excluding December, the Museum is open until midnight.) Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. 
Images - Loren Reed Smith
* * *

Loren Reed Smith lives in Lewisville, TX, a suburb of Dallas. Follow his photography on Tumblr at lorenreedsmith.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART - DALLAS, TEXAS

As mighty herds of longhorns went up the cattle trails, wealth came in, and there were strivings for culture such as theretofore had not been possible.
—Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)


The Dallas Museum of Art was first organized in 1903 as the Dallas Art Association. The year before, an exhibition was held in the Public Library’s gallery to raise money for a permanent collection. The admission charge was twenty-five cents. In a rare example of prices falling since the early 20th century, general admission to the Dallas Museum of Art is now free. 
Today, the collection includes more than 22,000 works and attracts more than half a million visitors each year. For more information, visit www.dallasmuseumofart.org.
Hours of admission: Tues and Wed - 11am-5pm; Thurs - 11am-9pm; Fri-Sun - 11am-5pm. (The third Friday of the month, excluding December, the Museum is open until midnight.) Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. 
Images - Loren Reed Smith
* * *

Loren Reed Smith lives in Lewisville, TX, a suburb of Dallas. Follow his photography on Tumblr at lorenreedsmith.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART - DALLAS, TEXAS

As mighty herds of longhorns went up the cattle trails, wealth came in, and there were strivings for culture such as theretofore had not been possible.
—Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)


The Dallas Museum of Art was first organized in 1903 as the Dallas Art Association. The year before, an exhibition was held in the Public Library’s gallery to raise money for a permanent collection. The admission charge was twenty-five cents. In a rare example of prices falling since the early 20th century, general admission to the Dallas Museum of Art is now free. 
Today, the collection includes more than 22,000 works and attracts more than half a million visitors each year. For more information, visit www.dallasmuseumofart.org.
Hours of admission: Tues and Wed - 11am-5pm; Thurs - 11am-9pm; Fri-Sun - 11am-5pm. (The third Friday of the month, excluding December, the Museum is open until midnight.) Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. 
Images - Loren Reed Smith
* * *

Loren Reed Smith lives in Lewisville, TX, a suburb of Dallas. Follow his photography on Tumblr at lorenreedsmith.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART - DALLAS, TEXAS

As mighty herds of longhorns went up the cattle trails, wealth came in, and there were strivings for culture such as theretofore had not been possible.
—Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)


The Dallas Museum of Art was first organized in 1903 as the Dallas Art Association. The year before, an exhibition was held in the Public Library’s gallery to raise money for a permanent collection. The admission charge was twenty-five cents. In a rare example of prices falling since the early 20th century, general admission to the Dallas Museum of Art is now free. 
Today, the collection includes more than 22,000 works and attracts more than half a million visitors each year. For more information, visit www.dallasmuseumofart.org.
Hours of admission: Tues and Wed - 11am-5pm; Thurs - 11am-9pm; Fri-Sun - 11am-5pm. (The third Friday of the month, excluding December, the Museum is open until midnight.) Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. 
Images - Loren Reed Smith
* * *

Loren Reed Smith lives in Lewisville, TX, a suburb of Dallas. Follow his photography on Tumblr at lorenreedsmith.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART - DALLAS, TEXAS

As mighty herds of longhorns went up the cattle trails, wealth came in, and there were strivings for culture such as theretofore had not been possible.

Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)

The Dallas Museum of Art was first organized in 1903 as the Dallas Art Association. The year before, an exhibition was held in the Public Library’s gallery to raise money for a permanent collection. The admission charge was twenty-five cents. In a rare example of prices falling since the early 20th century, general admission to the Dallas Museum of Art is now free. 

Today, the collection includes more than 22,000 works and attracts more than half a million visitors each year. For more information, visit www.dallasmuseumofart.org.

Hours of admission: Tues and Wed - 11am-5pm; Thurs - 11am-9pm; Fri-Sun - 11am-5pm. (The third Friday of the month, excluding December, the Museum is open until midnight.) Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. 

Images - Loren Reed Smith

* * *

Loren Reed Smith lives in Lewisville, TX, a suburb of Dallas. Follow his photography on Tumblr at lorenreedsmith.tumblr.com.

HONFEST - BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

American Guide Week lingers on with Ben Hinceman’s dispatch for Field Assignment #4 - Folk Festivals, Pageants, Celebrations and Customs:

HonFest is an annual homage to John Waters’ Baltimore. Since 1994 the summer festival has paid tribute to the working class women of Baltimore’s past (and present… though the number of authentic “hons” is dwindling). “Hon” is short for “honey” a term of endearment. 

* * *

Ben Hinceman is a hobbyist photographer who lives in Baltimore City with his wife and two sons.  Though he claims Baltimore City as his home, he was born in Colorado and has lived in Nebraska, South Dakota, Florida, Washington D.C., Hong Kong and London. Follow Ben on Tumblr at benhinceman.tumblr.com, or on Flickr at slightlyesoterik and check out his website at www.benphotos.com.

GOLDFIELD, NEVADA

GOLDFIELD (5,689 alt., 513 pop.), (tourist-camp, gasoline, restaurant), sits high on one side of a broad saddle between bare brown peaks. Seen from the highway, this fabulous town is drearier than a graveyard—for no one expects anything of the dead and Goldfield is not a ghost. 

Nevada, A Guide To the Silver State (WPA, 1940)

Eric Reeve files this dispatch for American Guide Week from the town that’s been among the walking dead since our WPA forebears visited in the 1940s:

Bronica ETRS & Kodak Tri-X 400

Like many western gold towns, Goldfield boomed then bust in a very short period of time, the difference here being that some people never left and a few interesting and eccentric folks continued to be drawn to the isolated city for years after the gold was exhausted. You’ll find beautifully kept cottages next to crumbling shacks, the famous Goldfield Hotel (reportedly haunted, of course) as well as a few businesses that are still operating, mostly thanks to the fact that Goldfield is a living ghost town.

* * *

Raised on the streets of Montréal, in the forests of Québec and on the fields of Ontario, Eric Reeve loves things altogether cultural, natural and rural. He’s a photographer based in the Pacific Northwest. Follow him on Tumblr at manandhisworld.tumblr.com

PASSAIC FALLS - PATERSON, NEW JERSEY
Jon Creamer shares a “waterfall of special beauty” for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways:

What brought me there in the first place was an interest in Paterson, or William Carlos William’s long poem of the same title…
From its Author’s Note….
"The Falls let out a roar as it crashed upon the rocks at its base. In the imagination this roar is a speech or a voice, a speech in particular; it is the poem itself that is the answer."
Wasn’t so much roaring the day I was there , still, it was something…

* * *
Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
PASSAIC FALLS - PATERSON, NEW JERSEY
Jon Creamer shares a “waterfall of special beauty” for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways:

What brought me there in the first place was an interest in Paterson, or William Carlos William’s long poem of the same title…
From its Author’s Note….
"The Falls let out a roar as it crashed upon the rocks at its base. In the imagination this roar is a speech or a voice, a speech in particular; it is the poem itself that is the answer."
Wasn’t so much roaring the day I was there , still, it was something…

* * *
Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

PASSAIC FALLS - PATERSON, NEW JERSEY

Jon Creamer shares a “waterfall of special beauty” for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways:

What brought me there in the first place was an interest in Paterson, or William Carlos William’s long poem of the same title…

From its Author’s Note….

"The Falls let out a roar as it crashed upon the rocks at its base. In the imagination this roar is a speech or a voice, a speech in particular; it is the poem itself that is the answer."

Wasn’t so much roaring the day I was there , still, it was something…

* * *

Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.