GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS, NORTH CAROLINA
Guide to North Carolina Brittany Kearns logs a report for Field Assignment #1: Topography and Climate, on how the Great Smoky Mountains got their name:

The Cherokee Indians have many legends about this area, which was part of their former home. Origin of the name Great Smoky is buried in obscurity, but it was probably suggested to Indians or early settlers by the tenuous mist, a dreamy blue haze like that of Indian summer, or deeper that hovers almost always over the high peaks. Earliest official Government use of the term is in the 1789 act of cession delimiting the boundaries of North Carolina and what is now the State of Tennessee: “… thence along the highest ridge of said mountains to the place where it is called Great Iron or Smoky Mountain.”
—North Carolina: a guide to the old north state (WPA, 1939)

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Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
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GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS, NORTH CAROLINA

Guide to North Carolina Brittany Kearns logs a report for Field Assignment #1: Topography and Climate, on how the Great Smoky Mountains got their name:

The Cherokee Indians have many legends about this area, which was part of their former home. Origin of the name Great Smoky is buried in obscurity, but it was probably suggested to Indians or early settlers by the tenuous mist, a dreamy blue haze like that of Indian summer, or deeper that hovers almost always over the high peaks. Earliest official Government use of the term is in the 1789 act of cession delimiting the boundaries of North Carolina and what is now the State of Tennessee: “… thence along the highest ridge of said mountains to the place where it is called Great Iron or Smoky Mountain.”

North Carolina: a guide to the old north state (WPA, 1939)

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Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  

FLEA MARKET - RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

For the past 30 years, the flea market at Raleigh’s State Fairgrounds has popped up each and every weekend. With nearly a thousand vendors, it now boasts the largest collection of antiques, jewelry, and furniture in North Carolina. According to a write-up in Country Living magazine, anywhere from 5,000 to 35,000 people visit on a weekend, depending on the weather and season (the flea market shuts down the last week in September for the annual State Fair and tends to stay closed until the weather warms).

Although the flea market is known for its antiques, there are vendors outside and in buildings around the grounds that sell a multitude of items, including tools, clothing, pet supplies, fresh produce and other local farm products, and many hand-crafted and imported items. Food stalls sell funnel cakes, hot dogs, and grilled sweet corn (my mother’s favorite).

Last weekend my husband and I took the 35-mile drive from our rural town into the “big city” of Raleigh to pick up some goods. We left the dogs at home, regrettably, as they would have enjoyed mingling with all the other canines at the dog-friendly market. The husband was on the lookout for new and vintage tools (he scored big), while I was more concerned with shooting a roll of Pro 400H film through my vintage Bronica (although I did pick up some earrings and a laborite ring for $12). It’s a great place to spend a Saturday or Sunday; just bring your best bartering game and your most comfortable walking shoes. You’ll surely leave with that can’t-live-without item, and probably for a steal of a deal.

Guide note: The Raleigh Flea Market is located at the NC State Fairgrounds, 1025 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh, NC 27607. Open Saturday, Sunday and Tuesday, 9am-6pm. Re-opens for 2013 on November 9th. Tel: 919-899-3532.

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Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  

PITTSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA

PITTSBORO, 72 m. (409 alt., 675 pop.), seat of Chatham County, is the market town for an agricultural region and has a plant that manufactures silk garment labels. The county was named for the Earl of Chatham and the town for his son, William Pitt, champion of Colonial rights in the British Parliament. The town was settled in 1771 by planters of the Cape Fear region, attracted by its pleasant summer climate.

North Carolina, A Guide To the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Pittsboro, like so many towns across the country, once relied on manufacturing and agriculture for its income. Textiles and chickens were its exports, but now, a bevy of store fronts and housing developments keep the town afloat. Boasting several antique stores, art galleries, a toy store, and a lovely little bookstore, historic Hillsborough Street (the main drag through the old part of town) is home to much of Pittsboro’s commerce (and charm).

Duck down a side street to find the local coffee shop, Davenport & Winkleperry, which doubles as a steampunk art gallery. At the top of town is French Connections, an imports store stocked with gorgeous items from around the world. (Author’s note: French Connections is my husband’s go-to for gift buying. I have quite a few metal sculptures gracing my lawn, as do many Chatham County residents.) Have a bite to eat at Virlie’s Grill or, for an old timey experience, S&T Soda Shoppe. And, if you’re in town on Thursday evening, be sure to check out the farmer’s market that pops up near the Food Lion.

On the horizon for Pittsboro? Enjoying the newly completed renovations on the historic courthouse (a fire in 2010 nearly destroyed it), and campaigning for the creation of a skate park (Pittsboroskatepark.com).

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BRITTANY KEARNS is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  

THRIFT - OUTSIDE RALEIGH, N.C.
Up-cycled furniture, antique clothing and linens, and tons of small treasures pack “SuzAnna’s Antiques,” a converted lawnmower repair shop located about 15 minutes north of downtown Raleigh. Outside, old doors and lawn furniture beg for a new home and a fresh coat of paint. SuzAnna’s is the go-to for all the local thrifters, who may or may not share the location of this treasured spot in an effort to save the good stuff for themselves.
* * *

BRITTANY KEARNS is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
THRIFT - OUTSIDE RALEIGH, N.C.
Up-cycled furniture, antique clothing and linens, and tons of small treasures pack “SuzAnna’s Antiques,” a converted lawnmower repair shop located about 15 minutes north of downtown Raleigh. Outside, old doors and lawn furniture beg for a new home and a fresh coat of paint. SuzAnna’s is the go-to for all the local thrifters, who may or may not share the location of this treasured spot in an effort to save the good stuff for themselves.
* * *

BRITTANY KEARNS is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
THRIFT - OUTSIDE RALEIGH, N.C.
Up-cycled furniture, antique clothing and linens, and tons of small treasures pack “SuzAnna’s Antiques,” a converted lawnmower repair shop located about 15 minutes north of downtown Raleigh. Outside, old doors and lawn furniture beg for a new home and a fresh coat of paint. SuzAnna’s is the go-to for all the local thrifters, who may or may not share the location of this treasured spot in an effort to save the good stuff for themselves.
* * *

BRITTANY KEARNS is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
THRIFT - OUTSIDE RALEIGH, N.C.
Up-cycled furniture, antique clothing and linens, and tons of small treasures pack “SuzAnna’s Antiques,” a converted lawnmower repair shop located about 15 minutes north of downtown Raleigh. Outside, old doors and lawn furniture beg for a new home and a fresh coat of paint. SuzAnna’s is the go-to for all the local thrifters, who may or may not share the location of this treasured spot in an effort to save the good stuff for themselves.
* * *

BRITTANY KEARNS is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
THRIFT - OUTSIDE RALEIGH, N.C.
Up-cycled furniture, antique clothing and linens, and tons of small treasures pack “SuzAnna’s Antiques,” a converted lawnmower repair shop located about 15 minutes north of downtown Raleigh. Outside, old doors and lawn furniture beg for a new home and a fresh coat of paint. SuzAnna’s is the go-to for all the local thrifters, who may or may not share the location of this treasured spot in an effort to save the good stuff for themselves.
* * *

BRITTANY KEARNS is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
THRIFT - OUTSIDE RALEIGH, N.C.
Up-cycled furniture, antique clothing and linens, and tons of small treasures pack “SuzAnna’s Antiques,” a converted lawnmower repair shop located about 15 minutes north of downtown Raleigh. Outside, old doors and lawn furniture beg for a new home and a fresh coat of paint. SuzAnna’s is the go-to for all the local thrifters, who may or may not share the location of this treasured spot in an effort to save the good stuff for themselves.
* * *

BRITTANY KEARNS is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info

THRIFT - OUTSIDE RALEIGH, N.C.

Up-cycled furniture, antique clothing and linens, and tons of small treasures pack “SuzAnna’s Antiques,” a converted lawnmower repair shop located about 15 minutes north of downtown Raleigh. Outside, old doors and lawn furniture beg for a new home and a fresh coat of paint. SuzAnna’s is the go-to for all the local thrifters, who may or may not share the location of this treasured spot in an effort to save the good stuff for themselves.

* * *

BRITTANY KEARNS is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  

JORDAN LAKE, NORTH CAROLINA
Spanning 21 square miles and nearly three counties, and smack-dab in the middle of North Carolina is the beautiful Jordan Lake. The reservoir and dam are two of the state’s most treasured and important resources; not only is the area a protected state park and popular recreation site, but it’s also tasked with flood and water quality control, and is responsible for supplying water to the capital metro area.
Jordan Lake’s history is an interesting one. Various cultures have called the area home for over ten centuries; both Revolutionary and Civil War troops marched through. But in the second half of the 20th century, big changes came. Twenty years after a particularly damaging tropical storm in 1945, the Army Corps of Engineers was handed the “New Hope Lake Project” (eventually renamed B. Everett Jordan Lake after the former Senator, who—little known fact—was eventually unseated by comedian Zack Galifianakis’s uncle). The Engineers were tasked with studying flood control and water resource needs in the area and as a result in the decade between 1973 and ‘83, the New Hope and Haw Rivers were dammed and flooded. Farming families were relocated; roads were rerouted or wholly covered by water. To this day, when the water is low enough, old roads and forgotten bridge parts create pseudo-sandbars for birds to sun themselves on.
Now a State Recreation Area, Jordan Lake’s shores are protected from development. At the south end is the impressive dam, where the surface can be calm or full of churning white caps, depending on the day. The past several years have seen a grassroots movement to clean up the scourge of litter plaguing Jordan Lake’s shores—a prime example of the place the area holds in the hearts of its residents. The bald eagle is the lake’s official animal, and the area is home to many other recognizable North American woodland animals. Visitors can fish, swim, sail, hike, hunt or camp. Boasting multiple boat ramps, canoe launches, two beaches, piers (including one that’s wheelchair-accessible), playgrounds, campgrounds, and a privately-owned marina, it’s one of the best places in the state to spend a day. This author, for one, is happy to call Jordan Lake home.
* * *

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
JORDAN LAKE, NORTH CAROLINA
Spanning 21 square miles and nearly three counties, and smack-dab in the middle of North Carolina is the beautiful Jordan Lake. The reservoir and dam are two of the state’s most treasured and important resources; not only is the area a protected state park and popular recreation site, but it’s also tasked with flood and water quality control, and is responsible for supplying water to the capital metro area.
Jordan Lake’s history is an interesting one. Various cultures have called the area home for over ten centuries; both Revolutionary and Civil War troops marched through. But in the second half of the 20th century, big changes came. Twenty years after a particularly damaging tropical storm in 1945, the Army Corps of Engineers was handed the “New Hope Lake Project” (eventually renamed B. Everett Jordan Lake after the former Senator, who—little known fact—was eventually unseated by comedian Zack Galifianakis’s uncle). The Engineers were tasked with studying flood control and water resource needs in the area and as a result in the decade between 1973 and ‘83, the New Hope and Haw Rivers were dammed and flooded. Farming families were relocated; roads were rerouted or wholly covered by water. To this day, when the water is low enough, old roads and forgotten bridge parts create pseudo-sandbars for birds to sun themselves on.
Now a State Recreation Area, Jordan Lake’s shores are protected from development. At the south end is the impressive dam, where the surface can be calm or full of churning white caps, depending on the day. The past several years have seen a grassroots movement to clean up the scourge of litter plaguing Jordan Lake’s shores—a prime example of the place the area holds in the hearts of its residents. The bald eagle is the lake’s official animal, and the area is home to many other recognizable North American woodland animals. Visitors can fish, swim, sail, hike, hunt or camp. Boasting multiple boat ramps, canoe launches, two beaches, piers (including one that’s wheelchair-accessible), playgrounds, campgrounds, and a privately-owned marina, it’s one of the best places in the state to spend a day. This author, for one, is happy to call Jordan Lake home.
* * *

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
JORDAN LAKE, NORTH CAROLINA
Spanning 21 square miles and nearly three counties, and smack-dab in the middle of North Carolina is the beautiful Jordan Lake. The reservoir and dam are two of the state’s most treasured and important resources; not only is the area a protected state park and popular recreation site, but it’s also tasked with flood and water quality control, and is responsible for supplying water to the capital metro area.
Jordan Lake’s history is an interesting one. Various cultures have called the area home for over ten centuries; both Revolutionary and Civil War troops marched through. But in the second half of the 20th century, big changes came. Twenty years after a particularly damaging tropical storm in 1945, the Army Corps of Engineers was handed the “New Hope Lake Project” (eventually renamed B. Everett Jordan Lake after the former Senator, who—little known fact—was eventually unseated by comedian Zack Galifianakis’s uncle). The Engineers were tasked with studying flood control and water resource needs in the area and as a result in the decade between 1973 and ‘83, the New Hope and Haw Rivers were dammed and flooded. Farming families were relocated; roads were rerouted or wholly covered by water. To this day, when the water is low enough, old roads and forgotten bridge parts create pseudo-sandbars for birds to sun themselves on.
Now a State Recreation Area, Jordan Lake’s shores are protected from development. At the south end is the impressive dam, where the surface can be calm or full of churning white caps, depending on the day. The past several years have seen a grassroots movement to clean up the scourge of litter plaguing Jordan Lake’s shores—a prime example of the place the area holds in the hearts of its residents. The bald eagle is the lake’s official animal, and the area is home to many other recognizable North American woodland animals. Visitors can fish, swim, sail, hike, hunt or camp. Boasting multiple boat ramps, canoe launches, two beaches, piers (including one that’s wheelchair-accessible), playgrounds, campgrounds, and a privately-owned marina, it’s one of the best places in the state to spend a day. This author, for one, is happy to call Jordan Lake home.
* * *

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
JORDAN LAKE, NORTH CAROLINA
Spanning 21 square miles and nearly three counties, and smack-dab in the middle of North Carolina is the beautiful Jordan Lake. The reservoir and dam are two of the state’s most treasured and important resources; not only is the area a protected state park and popular recreation site, but it’s also tasked with flood and water quality control, and is responsible for supplying water to the capital metro area.
Jordan Lake’s history is an interesting one. Various cultures have called the area home for over ten centuries; both Revolutionary and Civil War troops marched through. But in the second half of the 20th century, big changes came. Twenty years after a particularly damaging tropical storm in 1945, the Army Corps of Engineers was handed the “New Hope Lake Project” (eventually renamed B. Everett Jordan Lake after the former Senator, who—little known fact—was eventually unseated by comedian Zack Galifianakis’s uncle). The Engineers were tasked with studying flood control and water resource needs in the area and as a result in the decade between 1973 and ‘83, the New Hope and Haw Rivers were dammed and flooded. Farming families were relocated; roads were rerouted or wholly covered by water. To this day, when the water is low enough, old roads and forgotten bridge parts create pseudo-sandbars for birds to sun themselves on.
Now a State Recreation Area, Jordan Lake’s shores are protected from development. At the south end is the impressive dam, where the surface can be calm or full of churning white caps, depending on the day. The past several years have seen a grassroots movement to clean up the scourge of litter plaguing Jordan Lake’s shores—a prime example of the place the area holds in the hearts of its residents. The bald eagle is the lake’s official animal, and the area is home to many other recognizable North American woodland animals. Visitors can fish, swim, sail, hike, hunt or camp. Boasting multiple boat ramps, canoe launches, two beaches, piers (including one that’s wheelchair-accessible), playgrounds, campgrounds, and a privately-owned marina, it’s one of the best places in the state to spend a day. This author, for one, is happy to call Jordan Lake home.
* * *

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
JORDAN LAKE, NORTH CAROLINA
Spanning 21 square miles and nearly three counties, and smack-dab in the middle of North Carolina is the beautiful Jordan Lake. The reservoir and dam are two of the state’s most treasured and important resources; not only is the area a protected state park and popular recreation site, but it’s also tasked with flood and water quality control, and is responsible for supplying water to the capital metro area.
Jordan Lake’s history is an interesting one. Various cultures have called the area home for over ten centuries; both Revolutionary and Civil War troops marched through. But in the second half of the 20th century, big changes came. Twenty years after a particularly damaging tropical storm in 1945, the Army Corps of Engineers was handed the “New Hope Lake Project” (eventually renamed B. Everett Jordan Lake after the former Senator, who—little known fact—was eventually unseated by comedian Zack Galifianakis’s uncle). The Engineers were tasked with studying flood control and water resource needs in the area and as a result in the decade between 1973 and ‘83, the New Hope and Haw Rivers were dammed and flooded. Farming families were relocated; roads were rerouted or wholly covered by water. To this day, when the water is low enough, old roads and forgotten bridge parts create pseudo-sandbars for birds to sun themselves on.
Now a State Recreation Area, Jordan Lake’s shores are protected from development. At the south end is the impressive dam, where the surface can be calm or full of churning white caps, depending on the day. The past several years have seen a grassroots movement to clean up the scourge of litter plaguing Jordan Lake’s shores—a prime example of the place the area holds in the hearts of its residents. The bald eagle is the lake’s official animal, and the area is home to many other recognizable North American woodland animals. Visitors can fish, swim, sail, hike, hunt or camp. Boasting multiple boat ramps, canoe launches, two beaches, piers (including one that’s wheelchair-accessible), playgrounds, campgrounds, and a privately-owned marina, it’s one of the best places in the state to spend a day. This author, for one, is happy to call Jordan Lake home.
* * *

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
JORDAN LAKE, NORTH CAROLINA
Spanning 21 square miles and nearly three counties, and smack-dab in the middle of North Carolina is the beautiful Jordan Lake. The reservoir and dam are two of the state’s most treasured and important resources; not only is the area a protected state park and popular recreation site, but it’s also tasked with flood and water quality control, and is responsible for supplying water to the capital metro area.
Jordan Lake’s history is an interesting one. Various cultures have called the area home for over ten centuries; both Revolutionary and Civil War troops marched through. But in the second half of the 20th century, big changes came. Twenty years after a particularly damaging tropical storm in 1945, the Army Corps of Engineers was handed the “New Hope Lake Project” (eventually renamed B. Everett Jordan Lake after the former Senator, who—little known fact—was eventually unseated by comedian Zack Galifianakis’s uncle). The Engineers were tasked with studying flood control and water resource needs in the area and as a result in the decade between 1973 and ‘83, the New Hope and Haw Rivers were dammed and flooded. Farming families were relocated; roads were rerouted or wholly covered by water. To this day, when the water is low enough, old roads and forgotten bridge parts create pseudo-sandbars for birds to sun themselves on.
Now a State Recreation Area, Jordan Lake’s shores are protected from development. At the south end is the impressive dam, where the surface can be calm or full of churning white caps, depending on the day. The past several years have seen a grassroots movement to clean up the scourge of litter plaguing Jordan Lake’s shores—a prime example of the place the area holds in the hearts of its residents. The bald eagle is the lake’s official animal, and the area is home to many other recognizable North American woodland animals. Visitors can fish, swim, sail, hike, hunt or camp. Boasting multiple boat ramps, canoe launches, two beaches, piers (including one that’s wheelchair-accessible), playgrounds, campgrounds, and a privately-owned marina, it’s one of the best places in the state to spend a day. This author, for one, is happy to call Jordan Lake home.
* * *

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
JORDAN LAKE, NORTH CAROLINA
Spanning 21 square miles and nearly three counties, and smack-dab in the middle of North Carolina is the beautiful Jordan Lake. The reservoir and dam are two of the state’s most treasured and important resources; not only is the area a protected state park and popular recreation site, but it’s also tasked with flood and water quality control, and is responsible for supplying water to the capital metro area.
Jordan Lake’s history is an interesting one. Various cultures have called the area home for over ten centuries; both Revolutionary and Civil War troops marched through. But in the second half of the 20th century, big changes came. Twenty years after a particularly damaging tropical storm in 1945, the Army Corps of Engineers was handed the “New Hope Lake Project” (eventually renamed B. Everett Jordan Lake after the former Senator, who—little known fact—was eventually unseated by comedian Zack Galifianakis’s uncle). The Engineers were tasked with studying flood control and water resource needs in the area and as a result in the decade between 1973 and ‘83, the New Hope and Haw Rivers were dammed and flooded. Farming families were relocated; roads were rerouted or wholly covered by water. To this day, when the water is low enough, old roads and forgotten bridge parts create pseudo-sandbars for birds to sun themselves on.
Now a State Recreation Area, Jordan Lake’s shores are protected from development. At the south end is the impressive dam, where the surface can be calm or full of churning white caps, depending on the day. The past several years have seen a grassroots movement to clean up the scourge of litter plaguing Jordan Lake’s shores—a prime example of the place the area holds in the hearts of its residents. The bald eagle is the lake’s official animal, and the area is home to many other recognizable North American woodland animals. Visitors can fish, swim, sail, hike, hunt or camp. Boasting multiple boat ramps, canoe launches, two beaches, piers (including one that’s wheelchair-accessible), playgrounds, campgrounds, and a privately-owned marina, it’s one of the best places in the state to spend a day. This author, for one, is happy to call Jordan Lake home.
* * *

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
JORDAN LAKE, NORTH CAROLINA
Spanning 21 square miles and nearly three counties, and smack-dab in the middle of North Carolina is the beautiful Jordan Lake. The reservoir and dam are two of the state’s most treasured and important resources; not only is the area a protected state park and popular recreation site, but it’s also tasked with flood and water quality control, and is responsible for supplying water to the capital metro area.
Jordan Lake’s history is an interesting one. Various cultures have called the area home for over ten centuries; both Revolutionary and Civil War troops marched through. But in the second half of the 20th century, big changes came. Twenty years after a particularly damaging tropical storm in 1945, the Army Corps of Engineers was handed the “New Hope Lake Project” (eventually renamed B. Everett Jordan Lake after the former Senator, who—little known fact—was eventually unseated by comedian Zack Galifianakis’s uncle). The Engineers were tasked with studying flood control and water resource needs in the area and as a result in the decade between 1973 and ‘83, the New Hope and Haw Rivers were dammed and flooded. Farming families were relocated; roads were rerouted or wholly covered by water. To this day, when the water is low enough, old roads and forgotten bridge parts create pseudo-sandbars for birds to sun themselves on.
Now a State Recreation Area, Jordan Lake’s shores are protected from development. At the south end is the impressive dam, where the surface can be calm or full of churning white caps, depending on the day. The past several years have seen a grassroots movement to clean up the scourge of litter plaguing Jordan Lake’s shores—a prime example of the place the area holds in the hearts of its residents. The bald eagle is the lake’s official animal, and the area is home to many other recognizable North American woodland animals. Visitors can fish, swim, sail, hike, hunt or camp. Boasting multiple boat ramps, canoe launches, two beaches, piers (including one that’s wheelchair-accessible), playgrounds, campgrounds, and a privately-owned marina, it’s one of the best places in the state to spend a day. This author, for one, is happy to call Jordan Lake home.
* * *

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
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JORDAN LAKE, NORTH CAROLINA

Spanning 21 square miles and nearly three counties, and smack-dab in the middle of North Carolina is the beautiful Jordan Lake. The reservoir and dam are two of the state’s most treasured and important resources; not only is the area a protected state park and popular recreation site, but it’s also tasked with flood and water quality control, and is responsible for supplying water to the capital metro area.

Jordan Lake’s history is an interesting one. Various cultures have called the area home for over ten centuries; both Revolutionary and Civil War troops marched through. But in the second half of the 20th century, big changes came. Twenty years after a particularly damaging tropical storm in 1945, the Army Corps of Engineers was handed the “New Hope Lake Project” (eventually renamed B. Everett Jordan Lake after the former Senator, who—little known fact—was eventually unseated by comedian Zack Galifianakis’s uncle). The Engineers were tasked with studying flood control and water resource needs in the area and as a result in the decade between 1973 and ‘83, the New Hope and Haw Rivers were dammed and flooded. Farming families were relocated; roads were rerouted or wholly covered by water. To this day, when the water is low enough, old roads and forgotten bridge parts create pseudo-sandbars for birds to sun themselves on.

Now a State Recreation Area, Jordan Lake’s shores are protected from development. At the south end is the impressive dam, where the surface can be calm or full of churning white caps, depending on the day. The past several years have seen a grassroots movement to clean up the scourge of litter plaguing Jordan Lake’s shores—a prime example of the place the area holds in the hearts of its residents. The bald eagle is the lake’s official animal, and the area is home to many other recognizable North American woodland animals. Visitors can fish, swim, sail, hike, hunt or camp. Boasting multiple boat ramps, canoe launches, two beaches, piers (including one that’s wheelchair-accessible), playgrounds, campgrounds, and a privately-owned marina, it’s one of the best places in the state to spend a day. This author, for one, is happy to call Jordan Lake home.

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Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  

CHATHAM COUNTY TRACKS
Rail lines snake the landscape of the cities and towns of the Eastern Seaboard, and Chatham County, North Carolina is no exception. Two lines serve Raleigh’s rural neighbor: CSX and Norfolk Southern, and there’s hardly a spot in the county where the whistles of one of the two can’t be heard. CSX’s predecessor was the Seaboard System Railroad and before that the Seaboard Coast Line, although all that remains of the short-lived Class I rail are bridges stamped with the defunct company’s name. Smaller passenger rails used to be more prevalent, but the modern trains that now pass through Chatham County are less romance and more industry—vehicles of freight tagged with graffiti and moving goods, not people. But in the morning, when the light is perfect, it’s easy to find beauty in the tracks that tie the country together, and have since the nineteenth century.
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Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
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CHATHAM COUNTY TRACKS
Rail lines snake the landscape of the cities and towns of the Eastern Seaboard, and Chatham County, North Carolina is no exception. Two lines serve Raleigh’s rural neighbor: CSX and Norfolk Southern, and there’s hardly a spot in the county where the whistles of one of the two can’t be heard. CSX’s predecessor was the Seaboard System Railroad and before that the Seaboard Coast Line, although all that remains of the short-lived Class I rail are bridges stamped with the defunct company’s name. Smaller passenger rails used to be more prevalent, but the modern trains that now pass through Chatham County are less romance and more industry—vehicles of freight tagged with graffiti and moving goods, not people. But in the morning, when the light is perfect, it’s easy to find beauty in the tracks that tie the country together, and have since the nineteenth century.
* * *
Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info
CHATHAM COUNTY TRACKS
Rail lines snake the landscape of the cities and towns of the Eastern Seaboard, and Chatham County, North Carolina is no exception. Two lines serve Raleigh’s rural neighbor: CSX and Norfolk Southern, and there’s hardly a spot in the county where the whistles of one of the two can’t be heard. CSX’s predecessor was the Seaboard System Railroad and before that the Seaboard Coast Line, although all that remains of the short-lived Class I rail are bridges stamped with the defunct company’s name. Smaller passenger rails used to be more prevalent, but the modern trains that now pass through Chatham County are less romance and more industry—vehicles of freight tagged with graffiti and moving goods, not people. But in the morning, when the light is perfect, it’s easy to find beauty in the tracks that tie the country together, and have since the nineteenth century.
* * *
Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
Zoom Info

CHATHAM COUNTY TRACKS

Rail lines snake the landscape of the cities and towns of the Eastern Seaboard, and Chatham County, North Carolina is no exception. Two lines serve Raleigh’s rural neighbor: CSX and Norfolk Southern, and there’s hardly a spot in the county where the whistles of one of the two can’t be heard. CSX’s predecessor was the Seaboard System Railroad and before that the Seaboard Coast Line, although all that remains of the short-lived Class I rail are bridges stamped with the defunct company’s name. Smaller passenger rails used to be more prevalent, but the modern trains that now pass through Chatham County are less romance and more industry—vehicles of freight tagged with graffiti and moving goods, not people. But in the morning, when the light is perfect, it’s easy to find beauty in the tracks that tie the country together, and have since the nineteenth century.

* * *

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.