FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi. Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi. Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi. Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi.

Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.


* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

KENNESAW MOUNTAIN, GEORGIA

This point of elevation affords a superb sweep of the battle area below, and contributes effectively towards translating the map of the battle into a concrete image made up of actual places.

Georgia, A Guide To Its Towns and Countryside (WPA, 1940)

Located just outside of downtown Atlanta, Kennesaw Mountain is divided into two peaks, Big & Little Kennesaw. Originally inhabited by the mound builders, then the Creek people, the mountain was the site of The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, June 27th, 1864. Four thousand men died. Three thousand from General Sherman’s army alone. He later wrote his wife of the battle saying, “I regard the death and mangling of a couple thousand men as a small affair, a kind of morning dash — and it may be well that we become so hardened.”

Covering 2,923 acres, it held some of the heaviest fighting in the Atlanta Campaign of the Civil War. The site became a national battlefield park in June of 1935. 

These days you won’t find more than a nice view here. Cannons still line the hillside—more attractions placed to remind you of what happened than anything. People riding their bikes up the hill. Families playing in the field at the bottom of the mountain. On a clear day you can see for miles.

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Michael McCraw is a State Guide to Georgia and Alabama. He’s a photographer who’s spent his whole life in the South and when he’s not photographing or writing you can find him with his family or stocking shelves at his work. Follow his work on tinytinybirds.tumblr.com or at his website, michaelmccraw.net.

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI



The bluffs over which Vicksburg is spread are formed in part of a peculiar loess formation, a brown dust, or more accurately, a rock flour, blown eons ago from the Mississippi basin. The loess, caked 20 to 40 feet thick on all elevations and covered with jungle-like vegetation, often rises in sheer precipices. This makes a wild, rugged contour that has the appearance of distant castles, and gives to Vicksburg the air of a city in perpetual siege. This is not inappropriate, however, for by a siege Vicksburg is best known…

— Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)
Vicksburg, Mississippi is a river town. It was built around the river and has long been an important point of commerce.  As such, it was a critical area to control during the U.S. Civil War, and the impetus for the Siege of Vicksburg — what may be considered the turning point in favor of the North.  The forested hills of the city, along with the grounds of Vicksburg National Military Park still conceal the trenches, bunkers, and berms used both to defend and eventually capture the city. 
The river, while vital to the economy, can also have devastating effects. In the Great Flood of 1927 — one of the most destructive river floods in U.S. history — refugees from the Mississippi Delta region fled to the hills of Vicksburg.  Today, an improved levee system, including floodwalls, protects the city from rising waters, and marks the height of water from the past, showing both where Vicksburg has been and where it is going.
* * *
David Jones lives in the great state of Mississippi. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.


This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info

VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI

The bluffs over which Vicksburg is spread are formed in part of a peculiar loess formation, a brown dust, or more accurately, a rock flour, blown eons ago from the Mississippi basin. The loess, caked 20 to 40 feet thick on all elevations and covered with jungle-like vegetation, often rises in sheer precipices. This makes a wild, rugged contour that has the appearance of distant castles, and gives to Vicksburg the air of a city in perpetual siege. This is not inappropriate, however, for by a siege Vicksburg is best known…

— Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Vicksburg, Mississippi is a river town. It was built around the river and has long been an important point of commerce.  As such, it was a critical area to control during the U.S. Civil War, and the impetus for the Siege of Vicksburg — what may be considered the turning point in favor of the North.  The forested hills of the city, along with the grounds of Vicksburg National Military Park still conceal the trenches, bunkers, and berms used both to defend and eventually capture the city. 

The river, while vital to the economy, can also have devastating effects. In the Great Flood of 1927 — one of the most destructive river floods in U.S. history — refugees from the Mississippi Delta region fled to the hills of Vicksburg.  Today, an improved levee system, including floodwalls, protects the city from rising waters, and marks the height of water from the past, showing both where Vicksburg has been and where it is going.

* * *

David Jones lives in the great state of Mississippi. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.