THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO

As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.

Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.

With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College. 

Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.

Guide Notes

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock

Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH

Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.

There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.

In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert.

Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful.

True believers descended on the new utopia.

They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 

They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.

"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.

In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife.

The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.

In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.

Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - THE U.S. of A.

It’s Monday, November 18th, folks, and the sun has risen on the second annual American Guide Week. 

We’ve dug deep in the archives and unearthed the 1935 field manual sent out to our WPA predecessors. We’ve laid out ten assignments:

  1. Topography and Climate
  2. Flora and Fauna
  3. History
  4. Folk Festivals, Pageants, Celebrations and Customs
  5. National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks
  6. Architecture 
  7. Ethnography
  8. Waterways
  9. Transportation
  10. Products and Manufacturing/Industry

Now, trusted Guides, we send you out to report back with both hard facts and tall tales. The assignments should be used as inspiration for your dispatches, not as interrogations to be answered by rote. Write, photograph, film, record, draw, paint, sing. We look forward to seeing what you send our way.

Tag your new (or old) posts #americanguideweek, contact us through the Submit page or drop a line to theamericanguide@gmail.com. 

In the ardent words of the original manual, “At every point in the preparation of the Guide, voluntary assistance will be of the greatest importance.” This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. Glad to have you on board.

Be a Guide. Show us your state and we’ll show you ours.

* * *

Illustration by Guide to the West, James Orndorf - www.roughshelter.com

AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FIELD REPORTS, ASSIGNMENT #9 

Take Pride, It’s the American Guide

YOUR ASSIGNMENT, TRUSTED GUIDE:

The original American Guide series of books was produced by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration in the 1930s and ’40s. Your A/G editors unearthed the actual mimeographed field manual from 1935 that was sent out to each WPA state research office. Editors, researchers, and volunteers used the manual as a basis for collecting information on their district.

We’re asking you to do the same. Stay tuned all this week as we release 10 assignments drawn from the 1935 manual for the upcoming American Guide Week (Nov. 18-24). Use these questions as your guide for contributing #AmericanGuideWeek content. For your ninth assignment, Class IV - Transportation(And yes, these are actual questions from the manual.) 

CLASS IV - TRANSPORTATION

  • List transportation facilities in your district: Trains, buses, ferries, boats, planes, etc.
  • List the names of railroads, bus lines, and air lines serving your district.
  • In the Guide’s description of towns which constitute the last stopping place before crossing a desert or mountain range, some mention should be made of first aid stations along the route, facilities for water and gasoline, dangers, best time of day and season for crossing.

BE A GUIDE. SHOW AMERICA TO AMERICANS. 

Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photosillustrations and writing that answer these questions and describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things.

Check out a couple of past A/G posts on transportation here and here. Now go out there and describe/photograph/draw what it’s like where you live. 

This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.

#americanguideweek

Check out A/G Week assignments here.

* * *

Illustration by Guide to the West, James Orndorf - www.roughshelter.com

NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.

Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.

The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade. 

Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.  

On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.

Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.

Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - NOVEMBER 18-24, 2013

We’re celebrating 500 posts(!!) with the announcement of American Guide Week 2013.

Get ready to BE A GUIDE and SHOW US YOUR STATE

Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photos, illustrations and writing that describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things. This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.

Last year’s event was a blast and this time around we’ve got some special assignments in store. Start getting excited now.

Stay tuned for more info… and spread the word AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK is coming!

#americanguideweek

* * *

Illustration by Guide to the West, James Orndorf - www.roughshelter.com

NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO
Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.
After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.
The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.
Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. “Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.
Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.
Guide Note:
See the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction for yourself in Crownpoint, New Mexico. 
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO
Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.
After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.
The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.
Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. “Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.
Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.
Guide Note:
See the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction for yourself in Crownpoint, New Mexico. 
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO
Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.
After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.
The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.
Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. “Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.
Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.
Guide Note:
See the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction for yourself in Crownpoint, New Mexico. 
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO
Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.
After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.
The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.
Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. “Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.
Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.
Guide Note:
See the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction for yourself in Crownpoint, New Mexico. 
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO
Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.
After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.
The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.
Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. “Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.
Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.
Guide Note:
See the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction for yourself in Crownpoint, New Mexico. 
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO
Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.
After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.
The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.
Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. “Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.
Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.
Guide Note:
See the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction for yourself in Crownpoint, New Mexico. 
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO
Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.
After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.
The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.
Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. “Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.
Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.
Guide Note:
See the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction for yourself in Crownpoint, New Mexico. 
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO
Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.
After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.
The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.
Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. “Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.
Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.
Guide Note:
See the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction for yourself in Crownpoint, New Mexico. 
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO
Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.
After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.
The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.
Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. “Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.
Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.
Guide Note:
See the Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction for yourself in Crownpoint, New Mexico. 
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

NAVAJO RUG AUCTION - TOTAH FESTIVAL - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO

Navajo weaving is the mother of all Native American trade in the Southwest. Every year, from metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, to tiny and remote Crownpoint, New Mexico, Navajo artisans take part in the tradition of rug auctions.

After the failed Pueblo Rebellion against the Spanish in 1680, many Pueblo Indians in what is now New Mexico fled Spain’s brutal retaliation by going to live among the Navajo. The Pueblo Indians brought with them weaving technology and sheep, specifically the Churro, a small sheep with long clean wool—perfect for weaving—that the Spanish had introduced.

The 1800s brought the arrival of Anglo settlers, trading posts and the railroad to the Western frontier. Soon enough, the rest of the world discovered the beauty and complexity of Navajo weaving.

Today the Navajo Nation can be divided into 13 weaving regions, each with a distinctive style. ”Two Grey Hills” rugs reflect the muted colors of the desert. These rugs are often made with hand carded wool and dyed using local plants. ”Pictorial” rugs portray day-to-day life. Tree of Life” rugs are thought to be derived from sand paintings and show birds perched on corn or trees. The most widely known style is “Ganado” rugs with their red backgrounds and terraced diamonds and zigzags.

Rugs at these auctions can go from as low as $25 for a small piece to tens of thousands of dollars for larger, more intricate designs. Many people on the Navajo Reservation derive some portion of their income from the sale of arts and crafts and these events are a direct way to expose an often geographically isolated seller to buyers from around the world.

Guide Note:

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION

The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.  

Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.

Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.” 

Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks.

Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *

THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   

MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 

A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.

The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.

The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.

Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.

At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966. 

Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.

Guide Notes:

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.