PORT ARANSAS, TEXAS- FARLEY BOAT PLANTERS

Left from Aransas Pass over a long causeway and a ferry ($1.50 round trip, 50¢ for house trailers), to PORT ARANSAS, 5 m. (416 pop.) (boats and tackle for rent; ample tourist facilities), at the Gulf entrance to the Aransas Pass opening of the ship channel. This is a fishing resort on sandy, treeless Mustang Island, its few residences lost among the tourist lodges. Here are the United States Coast Guard Station and the Federal Weather Bureau Office, the latter stationed at this point to warn of hurricanes. A tarpon rodeo is held here annually.

Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)

Port Aransas used to be one of the best tarpon fishing destinations in the world, and the local Farley family was renowned for its tarpon guides and boat building talents. Several years ago, the Port Aransas Garden Club commissioned a mold that allowed a near-replica (though not to scale) of the Farley Boats to be reproduced in concrete. These concrete planters continue to be sold by the Port Aransas Garden Club, and nearly every business and a large number of the homes in Port Aransas have one. My favorite thing about the planters is that everyone who buys one customizes their boat through plantings and decorations, so each ends up as unique as its owner.

* * *

Brenna Brock is a State Guide to Texas who grew up in the western part of the state, but soon left for Austin in search of trees, hills, and occasional precipitation. When she’s not shooing varmints out of the garden, trying to cook native plants, or indulging her cats’ every whim, she’s probably chasing after something with a camera. She posts a photo nearly every day on Tumblr at Mr. Cake’s Photo Adventures.

CUSTOM HOUSE WHARF – PORTLAND, MAINE

Portland, Maine is better than ever. I suppose there might be some dyed-in-the-wool native Mainers who would disagree and harken back to some memory they’re holding onto from yesteryear, but in my lifetime Portland has never looked so good. The abundance of culture is astounding—music, art, food… It’s more prevalent than years past and the quality is on par with (if not actually better than) much larger cities. But as much as I love getting back to my native state and seeing what newness Portland has to offer, I also appreciate Portland for how much it hasn’t changed.

As quickly as Portland continues to evolve, The Custom House Wharf is the best example of what hasn’t budged one bit. This has always been a commercial, working waterfront. Ferryboats going out, ferryboats coming in. Trawlers going out, trawlers coming in. Lobster boats going out, lobster boats coming in.It doesn’t stop. There is constant activity along the waterline, but somehow time stands still on Custom House Wharf. Every building looks as though it’s been there forever and might possibly fall down tomorrow.

Whenever I can I like to stroll the wharf and breathe in the salt water and the slightly foul stench of bait and whatever sea life is being processed behind closed doors. It is a spot unlike any other in town. Most of downtown Portland has been very well preserved, and the brick buildings appear as they always have—and they look to stand another century or more—but here on the wharf you wonder how it’s lasted this long without a renovation. The wooden façades are grey and raw, stripped bare by the constant, salty sea breeze that renders everything to its greyest and brownest core. There are hints of yellow where newer pieces of plywood have been used as patchwork, slowly mellowing with the weather.

There are a few places to poke your head into—one of the best fish markets in town, and a diner, as well as a comedy club. But most of the buildings are private and they are as nondescript as the barren wood they are constructed from. There is a rough and ugly beauty to this piece of Portland that’s a reminder of what the city was literally and figuratively built on. It’s living history, and it continues to be a fantastic contrast to all the things that are changing everywhere else in town.

* * *

Guide to the Northeast Brett Klein lives in Connecticut and works in New York, but prefers small town life and his home state of Maine. Any chance to get rural is a mental vacation. Follow Klein on Tumblr at The Coast is Clear. His curatorial collection of Americana, rural life, other artists and ephemera can be seen on Tumblr at Tons of Land.

INDIANA

Here the prairie starts its westward sweep…

Indiana, A Guide To the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

…The “This Way” sign is located right outside the town of Maukport, Indiana.  Maukport is a small town (population 81) only a stone’s throw from the Ohio River.  I spoke at length with the owner of the Riverbottom Inn, a local dive, and she said most of the people in the town were forced out when it flooded around a decade ago.  

…The truck on the road is near Starlight, Indiana, my mother’s hometown. Starlight is built on a network of hills and the only way to get to any part of the town is to drive up them. 

…The woman sitting in the pew is attending a 8:00am service at St. John the Baptist Church in Starlight, Indiana.

…”Jack’s” is a pool hall located in New Albany, Indiana. It’s one of the only bars left in town where you can still smoke.  Believe me when I say that people that play there are serious about pool.

…The woman reading the paper is sitting in a public library in Corydon, Indiana.

…The man in the stables is a traveling blacksmith.  He had arrived to reattach a horse shoe to a race horse on a farm in Borden, Indiana.

…The sprinkler in the yard was in a small suburb of Salem Indiana, just before dusk. 

* * *

Guide to the Midwest Tom Hoying is a documentary photographer and photo illustrator living and working in Columbus, OH.  He spends his free time traveling across the midwest working on long term documentary photo projects. You can view more of his work on his website, tomhoying.com and his tumblr, tomhoying.tumblr.com.

SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

  1. Boot Bar lettering.
  2. Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
  3. Dodge lettering. 
  4. Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
  5. King of Jeans lettering.
  6. A Man’s Image lettering. 
  7. Melino’s lettering. 
  8. Texas Weiners lettering.
  9. Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
  10. DEERE lettering. 

* * *

Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.

MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
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MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info

MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.

Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *

Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.

North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.

Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.

* * *

Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.

TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 

There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.

* * *

Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblrInstagram, or through her website.

WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
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New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info

WINTER - WINDHAM, NY

Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.

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New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.

RURAL NORTH CAROLINA

Hard-working, hard-headed men, with no foreknowledge of the inevitable change in relationship from money and land to money and machinery, attached themselves and their region to the change.

North Carolina, A Guide To the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Growing up in the Northeast, and being a photographer, my impressions of the South came largely through looking at photographs. So I was cognizant of the history of photography in this region—the work of the Farm Security Administration photographers, for example—when I moved to North Carolina from New Jersey in 1989.

I soon began exploring with my cameras, drawn to those places that are off the beaten track, neglected or abandoned.

By 2008, North Carolina was the third-fastest-growing state in the United States and the fastest-growing state east of the Mississippi River, and it was losing some of its distinctive characteristics. I’d become an unwitting witness to an inevitable transition.

I have now photographed in more than 365 cities, towns and small rural communities across the Tar Heel State—from Aberdeen to Zebulon, from the mountains to the coast—motivated by the dedication of my predecessors and by the affection I feel for my new home. Although my aim is to make good pictures, a local reviewer perceived a bigger picture when she wrote: “David Simonton records for us the old North Carolina at its moment of passing.”

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David Simonton is a Raleigh-based photographer. His North Carolina photographs are in the collections of the George Eastman House, North Carolina Museum of Art, Asheville Art Museum and the Do Good Fund: Southern Photography Initiative. Find him on the web at www.davidsimonton.com and follow him on Tumblr at davidsimonton.tumblr.com.

'ELYSIAN FIELDS' - WISCONSIN

Some of these Wisconsin vehicles outlasted the weather and ravages of time to become daily drivers. Others found their Elysian Fields, which is where heroes went after their deaths in Greek mythology.

A broke-down automobile can sometimes have the look of a fallen hero. 

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Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.