INDIANA

Here the prairie starts its westward sweep…

Indiana, A Guide To the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

…The “This Way” sign is located right outside the town of Maukport, Indiana.  Maukport is a small town (population 81) only a stone’s throw from the Ohio River.  I spoke at length with the owner of the Riverbottom Inn, a local dive, and she said most of the people in the town were forced out when it flooded around a decade ago.  

…The truck on the road is near Starlight, Indiana, my mother’s hometown. Starlight is built on a network of hills and the only way to get to any part of the town is to drive up them. 

…The woman sitting in the pew is attending a 8:00am service at St. John the Baptist Church in Starlight, Indiana.

…”Jack’s” is a pool hall located in New Albany, Indiana. It’s one of the only bars left in town where you can still smoke.  Believe me when I say that people that play there are serious about pool.

…The woman reading the paper is sitting in a public library in Corydon, Indiana.

…The man in the stables is a traveling blacksmith.  He had arrived to reattach a horse shoe to a race horse on a farm in Borden, Indiana.

…The sprinkler in the yard was in a small suburb of Salem Indiana, just before dusk. 

* * *

Guide to the Midwest Tom Hoying is a documentary photographer and photo illustrator living and working in Columbus, OH.  He spends his free time traveling across the midwest working on long term documentary photo projects. You can view more of his work on his website, tomhoying.com and his tumblr, tomhoying.tumblr.com.

SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

  1. Boot Bar lettering.
  2. Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
  3. Dodge lettering. 
  4. Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
  5. King of Jeans lettering.
  6. A Man’s Image lettering. 
  7. Melino’s lettering. 
  8. Texas Weiners lettering.
  9. Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
  10. DEERE lettering. 

* * *

Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.

MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info

MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.

Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *

Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.

RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
Zoom Info
RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
Zoom Info
RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…

—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.

In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  

Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.

While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.

During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.

With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   

After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.

Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.

 * * *

April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.

Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.

North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.

Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.

* * *

Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.

TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
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TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info

TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 

There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.

* * *

Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblrInstagram, or through her website.

WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info

WINTER - WINDHAM, NY

Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.

* * *

New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.

RURAL NORTH CAROLINA

Hard-working, hard-headed men, with no foreknowledge of the inevitable change in relationship from money and land to money and machinery, attached themselves and their region to the change.

North Carolina, A Guide To the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Growing up in the Northeast, and being a photographer, my impressions of the South came largely through looking at photographs. So I was cognizant of the history of photography in this region—the work of the Farm Security Administration photographers, for example—when I moved to North Carolina from New Jersey in 1989.

I soon began exploring with my cameras, drawn to those places that are off the beaten track, neglected or abandoned.

By 2008, North Carolina was the third-fastest-growing state in the United States and the fastest-growing state east of the Mississippi River, and it was losing some of its distinctive characteristics. I’d become an unwitting witness to an inevitable transition.

I have now photographed in more than 365 cities, towns and small rural communities across the Tar Heel State—from Aberdeen to Zebulon, from the mountains to the coast—motivated by the dedication of my predecessors and by the affection I feel for my new home. Although my aim is to make good pictures, a local reviewer perceived a bigger picture when she wrote: “David Simonton records for us the old North Carolina at its moment of passing.”

* * *

David Simonton is a Raleigh-based photographer. His North Carolina photographs are in the collections of the George Eastman House, North Carolina Museum of Art, Asheville Art Museum and the Do Good Fund: Southern Photography Initiative. Find him on the web at www.davidsimonton.com and follow him on Tumblr at davidsimonton.tumblr.com.

THE CIRCUS DRIVE-IN - WALL TOWNSHIP, NEW JERSEY

The Circus Drive-In was established in 1954 in Wall Township, New Jersey and has been a state landmark ever since. The classic drive-in, synonymous with the 1950s, has virtually disappeared from the American landscape. But “The Circus” survives and thrives on the New Jersey shore.

Serving up fare either curbside or “under the big top”, this unique restaurant offers much more than just hamburgers and hot dogs. Specialty items include a Maryland jumbo soft shell crab sandwich, the Lobster Roll and a lobster salad sandwich served on a New England style roll. The soft shell crab sandwich has been a featured menu item since the days when the original owner would fly his own plane down to Maryland to purchase the crabs he served his customers.

Strip malls and chain stores, which reign supreme in the 21st century, seem to make America homogeneous from sea to shining sea. But there are yet some of these unique, family owned businesses that survive—and thrive—and do so in the Garden State.

* * *

North Carolina native Gregory Drew, who holds a B.A. degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, is documenting his adopted home of New Jersey. His goal is to destroy the unfair stereotypes and show the beauty and diversity of the state’s landscape and its people. He also hopes to someday give up his day job and focus on his photography full time as he travels around the USA and the world. You can follow Greg on Tumblr at http://randomlake.tumblr.com.

'ELYSIAN FIELDS' - WISCONSIN

Some of these Wisconsin vehicles outlasted the weather and ravages of time to become daily drivers. Others found their Elysian Fields, which is where heroes went after their deaths in Greek mythology.

A broke-down automobile can sometimes have the look of a fallen hero. 

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.