WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY
Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.
* * *
New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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WINTER - WINDHAM, NY

Windham is a small town nestled in the Catskill mountains. It has a largely white, middle class population of around 2,000 inhabitants, which fluctuates on weekends when vacationing New York City residents visit to enjoy the ski resort and mountains. Well preserved architecture from before the turn of the 20th century adds charm to the main road (Highway 23) passing through.

* * *

New York Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.

California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 

* * *

New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.

OCEAN GROVE, NEW JERSEY

OCEAN GROVE, 26.8 m. (20 alt., 1,182 pop.), belongs to the Reconstruction Era and Queen Victoria. The resort was developed in the period of Eastlake architecture, with odd half-houses to which tent fronts are added, with fretwork villas, and with neo-Swiss chalets of the Centennial Exposition type, ornamented with tiers of narrow porches and turrets.
Founded in 1869 for Methodist camp meetings, Ocean Grove has always strictly observed the religious ideals of the founders. From the beginning, vehicular traffic has been forbidden from midnight Saturday until midnight Sunday. The city’s gates are closed during that period and none but pedestrians may enter or leave; nor is bathing or any secular business permitted on the Sabbath. …
Each summer during the last week in August saints and sinners, penitents and probationers, evangelists, singers, and trombone players come from all parts of the country… After hearing the call to repentance and new life, the pilgrims are joined by most of the population of the resort for the “march around Jerusalem,” which closes the meeting
—New Jersey, A Guide To Its Present and Past (WPA, 1939)

Ocean Grove, NJ is an immaculate community that was originally founded as a Christian religious resort in 1869 during the post-Civil War camp meeting movement that fueled settlement of the east coast. Located on the Jersey shore next to rock music mecca Asbury Beach, it also contains some of the greatest examples of Victorian and early-20th century architecture in the United States. The spirit and culture of Ocean Grove then and now revolves around the summer meetings and religious community. Every year around 10,000 religious worshippers come to hear 10 days of sermons and attend close-knit community events.  Canvas tents (designed today as they were 100 years ago) erected along the great auditorium are also available to rent.  Residents of the community live in accordance with a strict code of rules; in the past they were not even allowed to dance or drive cars on Sundays. 
Walking through the neighborhood of beautiful porch-wrapped homes sitting tightly together feels a bit like walking through a museum as everything is unnervingly perfect—it hardly feels lived in. But it’s interesting to see how different groups of people go about creating their personal utopia, and in the case of Ocean Grove they have been successful and are still going strong.
Guide note: Although bathing by the shore is now permitted on Sundays, the hours are limited. The beach is open from 9:30am-5:30pm Mon-Sat and 12:30-5:30pm on Sunday.
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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OCEAN GROVE, NEW JERSEY

OCEAN GROVE, 26.8 m. (20 alt., 1,182 pop.), belongs to the Reconstruction Era and Queen Victoria. The resort was developed in the period of Eastlake architecture, with odd half-houses to which tent fronts are added, with fretwork villas, and with neo-Swiss chalets of the Centennial Exposition type, ornamented with tiers of narrow porches and turrets.
Founded in 1869 for Methodist camp meetings, Ocean Grove has always strictly observed the religious ideals of the founders. From the beginning, vehicular traffic has been forbidden from midnight Saturday until midnight Sunday. The city’s gates are closed during that period and none but pedestrians may enter or leave; nor is bathing or any secular business permitted on the Sabbath. …
Each summer during the last week in August saints and sinners, penitents and probationers, evangelists, singers, and trombone players come from all parts of the country… After hearing the call to repentance and new life, the pilgrims are joined by most of the population of the resort for the “march around Jerusalem,” which closes the meeting
—New Jersey, A Guide To Its Present and Past (WPA, 1939)

Ocean Grove, NJ is an immaculate community that was originally founded as a Christian religious resort in 1869 during the post-Civil War camp meeting movement that fueled settlement of the east coast. Located on the Jersey shore next to rock music mecca Asbury Beach, it also contains some of the greatest examples of Victorian and early-20th century architecture in the United States. The spirit and culture of Ocean Grove then and now revolves around the summer meetings and religious community. Every year around 10,000 religious worshippers come to hear 10 days of sermons and attend close-knit community events.  Canvas tents (designed today as they were 100 years ago) erected along the great auditorium are also available to rent.  Residents of the community live in accordance with a strict code of rules; in the past they were not even allowed to dance or drive cars on Sundays. 
Walking through the neighborhood of beautiful porch-wrapped homes sitting tightly together feels a bit like walking through a museum as everything is unnervingly perfect—it hardly feels lived in. But it’s interesting to see how different groups of people go about creating their personal utopia, and in the case of Ocean Grove they have been successful and are still going strong.
Guide note: Although bathing by the shore is now permitted on Sundays, the hours are limited. The beach is open from 9:30am-5:30pm Mon-Sat and 12:30-5:30pm on Sunday.
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
OCEAN GROVE, NEW JERSEY

OCEAN GROVE, 26.8 m. (20 alt., 1,182 pop.), belongs to the Reconstruction Era and Queen Victoria. The resort was developed in the period of Eastlake architecture, with odd half-houses to which tent fronts are added, with fretwork villas, and with neo-Swiss chalets of the Centennial Exposition type, ornamented with tiers of narrow porches and turrets.
Founded in 1869 for Methodist camp meetings, Ocean Grove has always strictly observed the religious ideals of the founders. From the beginning, vehicular traffic has been forbidden from midnight Saturday until midnight Sunday. The city’s gates are closed during that period and none but pedestrians may enter or leave; nor is bathing or any secular business permitted on the Sabbath. …
Each summer during the last week in August saints and sinners, penitents and probationers, evangelists, singers, and trombone players come from all parts of the country… After hearing the call to repentance and new life, the pilgrims are joined by most of the population of the resort for the “march around Jerusalem,” which closes the meeting
—New Jersey, A Guide To Its Present and Past (WPA, 1939)

Ocean Grove, NJ is an immaculate community that was originally founded as a Christian religious resort in 1869 during the post-Civil War camp meeting movement that fueled settlement of the east coast. Located on the Jersey shore next to rock music mecca Asbury Beach, it also contains some of the greatest examples of Victorian and early-20th century architecture in the United States. The spirit and culture of Ocean Grove then and now revolves around the summer meetings and religious community. Every year around 10,000 religious worshippers come to hear 10 days of sermons and attend close-knit community events.  Canvas tents (designed today as they were 100 years ago) erected along the great auditorium are also available to rent.  Residents of the community live in accordance with a strict code of rules; in the past they were not even allowed to dance or drive cars on Sundays. 
Walking through the neighborhood of beautiful porch-wrapped homes sitting tightly together feels a bit like walking through a museum as everything is unnervingly perfect—it hardly feels lived in. But it’s interesting to see how different groups of people go about creating their personal utopia, and in the case of Ocean Grove they have been successful and are still going strong.
Guide note: Although bathing by the shore is now permitted on Sundays, the hours are limited. The beach is open from 9:30am-5:30pm Mon-Sat and 12:30-5:30pm on Sunday.
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New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
OCEAN GROVE, NEW JERSEY

OCEAN GROVE, 26.8 m. (20 alt., 1,182 pop.), belongs to the Reconstruction Era and Queen Victoria. The resort was developed in the period of Eastlake architecture, with odd half-houses to which tent fronts are added, with fretwork villas, and with neo-Swiss chalets of the Centennial Exposition type, ornamented with tiers of narrow porches and turrets.
Founded in 1869 for Methodist camp meetings, Ocean Grove has always strictly observed the religious ideals of the founders. From the beginning, vehicular traffic has been forbidden from midnight Saturday until midnight Sunday. The city’s gates are closed during that period and none but pedestrians may enter or leave; nor is bathing or any secular business permitted on the Sabbath. …
Each summer during the last week in August saints and sinners, penitents and probationers, evangelists, singers, and trombone players come from all parts of the country… After hearing the call to repentance and new life, the pilgrims are joined by most of the population of the resort for the “march around Jerusalem,” which closes the meeting
—New Jersey, A Guide To Its Present and Past (WPA, 1939)

Ocean Grove, NJ is an immaculate community that was originally founded as a Christian religious resort in 1869 during the post-Civil War camp meeting movement that fueled settlement of the east coast. Located on the Jersey shore next to rock music mecca Asbury Beach, it also contains some of the greatest examples of Victorian and early-20th century architecture in the United States. The spirit and culture of Ocean Grove then and now revolves around the summer meetings and religious community. Every year around 10,000 religious worshippers come to hear 10 days of sermons and attend close-knit community events.  Canvas tents (designed today as they were 100 years ago) erected along the great auditorium are also available to rent.  Residents of the community live in accordance with a strict code of rules; in the past they were not even allowed to dance or drive cars on Sundays. 
Walking through the neighborhood of beautiful porch-wrapped homes sitting tightly together feels a bit like walking through a museum as everything is unnervingly perfect—it hardly feels lived in. But it’s interesting to see how different groups of people go about creating their personal utopia, and in the case of Ocean Grove they have been successful and are still going strong.
Guide note: Although bathing by the shore is now permitted on Sundays, the hours are limited. The beach is open from 9:30am-5:30pm Mon-Sat and 12:30-5:30pm on Sunday.
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
OCEAN GROVE, NEW JERSEY

OCEAN GROVE, 26.8 m. (20 alt., 1,182 pop.), belongs to the Reconstruction Era and Queen Victoria. The resort was developed in the period of Eastlake architecture, with odd half-houses to which tent fronts are added, with fretwork villas, and with neo-Swiss chalets of the Centennial Exposition type, ornamented with tiers of narrow porches and turrets.
Founded in 1869 for Methodist camp meetings, Ocean Grove has always strictly observed the religious ideals of the founders. From the beginning, vehicular traffic has been forbidden from midnight Saturday until midnight Sunday. The city’s gates are closed during that period and none but pedestrians may enter or leave; nor is bathing or any secular business permitted on the Sabbath. …
Each summer during the last week in August saints and sinners, penitents and probationers, evangelists, singers, and trombone players come from all parts of the country… After hearing the call to repentance and new life, the pilgrims are joined by most of the population of the resort for the “march around Jerusalem,” which closes the meeting
—New Jersey, A Guide To Its Present and Past (WPA, 1939)

Ocean Grove, NJ is an immaculate community that was originally founded as a Christian religious resort in 1869 during the post-Civil War camp meeting movement that fueled settlement of the east coast. Located on the Jersey shore next to rock music mecca Asbury Beach, it also contains some of the greatest examples of Victorian and early-20th century architecture in the United States. The spirit and culture of Ocean Grove then and now revolves around the summer meetings and religious community. Every year around 10,000 religious worshippers come to hear 10 days of sermons and attend close-knit community events.  Canvas tents (designed today as they were 100 years ago) erected along the great auditorium are also available to rent.  Residents of the community live in accordance with a strict code of rules; in the past they were not even allowed to dance or drive cars on Sundays. 
Walking through the neighborhood of beautiful porch-wrapped homes sitting tightly together feels a bit like walking through a museum as everything is unnervingly perfect—it hardly feels lived in. But it’s interesting to see how different groups of people go about creating their personal utopia, and in the case of Ocean Grove they have been successful and are still going strong.
Guide note: Although bathing by the shore is now permitted on Sundays, the hours are limited. The beach is open from 9:30am-5:30pm Mon-Sat and 12:30-5:30pm on Sunday.
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
OCEAN GROVE, NEW JERSEY

OCEAN GROVE, 26.8 m. (20 alt., 1,182 pop.), belongs to the Reconstruction Era and Queen Victoria. The resort was developed in the period of Eastlake architecture, with odd half-houses to which tent fronts are added, with fretwork villas, and with neo-Swiss chalets of the Centennial Exposition type, ornamented with tiers of narrow porches and turrets.
Founded in 1869 for Methodist camp meetings, Ocean Grove has always strictly observed the religious ideals of the founders. From the beginning, vehicular traffic has been forbidden from midnight Saturday until midnight Sunday. The city’s gates are closed during that period and none but pedestrians may enter or leave; nor is bathing or any secular business permitted on the Sabbath. …
Each summer during the last week in August saints and sinners, penitents and probationers, evangelists, singers, and trombone players come from all parts of the country… After hearing the call to repentance and new life, the pilgrims are joined by most of the population of the resort for the “march around Jerusalem,” which closes the meeting
—New Jersey, A Guide To Its Present and Past (WPA, 1939)

Ocean Grove, NJ is an immaculate community that was originally founded as a Christian religious resort in 1869 during the post-Civil War camp meeting movement that fueled settlement of the east coast. Located on the Jersey shore next to rock music mecca Asbury Beach, it also contains some of the greatest examples of Victorian and early-20th century architecture in the United States. The spirit and culture of Ocean Grove then and now revolves around the summer meetings and religious community. Every year around 10,000 religious worshippers come to hear 10 days of sermons and attend close-knit community events.  Canvas tents (designed today as they were 100 years ago) erected along the great auditorium are also available to rent.  Residents of the community live in accordance with a strict code of rules; in the past they were not even allowed to dance or drive cars on Sundays. 
Walking through the neighborhood of beautiful porch-wrapped homes sitting tightly together feels a bit like walking through a museum as everything is unnervingly perfect—it hardly feels lived in. But it’s interesting to see how different groups of people go about creating their personal utopia, and in the case of Ocean Grove they have been successful and are still going strong.
Guide note: Although bathing by the shore is now permitted on Sundays, the hours are limited. The beach is open from 9:30am-5:30pm Mon-Sat and 12:30-5:30pm on Sunday.
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info
OCEAN GROVE, NEW JERSEY

OCEAN GROVE, 26.8 m. (20 alt., 1,182 pop.), belongs to the Reconstruction Era and Queen Victoria. The resort was developed in the period of Eastlake architecture, with odd half-houses to which tent fronts are added, with fretwork villas, and with neo-Swiss chalets of the Centennial Exposition type, ornamented with tiers of narrow porches and turrets.
Founded in 1869 for Methodist camp meetings, Ocean Grove has always strictly observed the religious ideals of the founders. From the beginning, vehicular traffic has been forbidden from midnight Saturday until midnight Sunday. The city’s gates are closed during that period and none but pedestrians may enter or leave; nor is bathing or any secular business permitted on the Sabbath. …
Each summer during the last week in August saints and sinners, penitents and probationers, evangelists, singers, and trombone players come from all parts of the country… After hearing the call to repentance and new life, the pilgrims are joined by most of the population of the resort for the “march around Jerusalem,” which closes the meeting
—New Jersey, A Guide To Its Present and Past (WPA, 1939)

Ocean Grove, NJ is an immaculate community that was originally founded as a Christian religious resort in 1869 during the post-Civil War camp meeting movement that fueled settlement of the east coast. Located on the Jersey shore next to rock music mecca Asbury Beach, it also contains some of the greatest examples of Victorian and early-20th century architecture in the United States. The spirit and culture of Ocean Grove then and now revolves around the summer meetings and religious community. Every year around 10,000 religious worshippers come to hear 10 days of sermons and attend close-knit community events.  Canvas tents (designed today as they were 100 years ago) erected along the great auditorium are also available to rent.  Residents of the community live in accordance with a strict code of rules; in the past they were not even allowed to dance or drive cars on Sundays. 
Walking through the neighborhood of beautiful porch-wrapped homes sitting tightly together feels a bit like walking through a museum as everything is unnervingly perfect—it hardly feels lived in. But it’s interesting to see how different groups of people go about creating their personal utopia, and in the case of Ocean Grove they have been successful and are still going strong.
Guide note: Although bathing by the shore is now permitted on Sundays, the hours are limited. The beach is open from 9:30am-5:30pm Mon-Sat and 12:30-5:30pm on Sunday.
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info

OCEAN GROVE, NEW JERSEY

OCEAN GROVE, 26.8 m. (20 alt., 1,182 pop.), belongs to the Reconstruction Era and Queen Victoria. The resort was developed in the period of Eastlake architecture, with odd half-houses to which tent fronts are added, with fretwork villas, and with neo-Swiss chalets of the Centennial Exposition type, ornamented with tiers of narrow porches and turrets.

Founded in 1869 for Methodist camp meetings, Ocean Grove has always strictly observed the religious ideals of the founders. From the beginning, vehicular traffic has been forbidden from midnight Saturday until midnight Sunday. The city’s gates are closed during that period and none but pedestrians may enter or leave; nor is bathing or any secular business permitted on the Sabbath. …

Each summer during the last week in August saints and sinners, penitents and probationers, evangelists, singers, and trombone players come from all parts of the country… After hearing the call to repentance and new life, the pilgrims are joined by most of the population of the resort for the “march around Jerusalem,” which closes the meeting

New Jersey, A Guide To Its Present and Past (WPA, 1939)

Ocean Grove, NJ is an immaculate community that was originally founded as a Christian religious resort in 1869 during the post-Civil War camp meeting movement that fueled settlement of the east coast. Located on the Jersey shore next to rock music mecca Asbury Beach, it also contains some of the greatest examples of Victorian and early-20th century architecture in the United States. The spirit and culture of Ocean Grove then and now revolves around the summer meetings and religious community. Every year around 10,000 religious worshippers come to hear 10 days of sermons and attend close-knit community events.  Canvas tents (designed today as they were 100 years ago) erected along the great auditorium are also available to rent.  Residents of the community live in accordance with a strict code of rules; in the past they were not even allowed to dance or drive cars on Sundays. 

Walking through the neighborhood of beautiful porch-wrapped homes sitting tightly together feels a bit like walking through a museum as everything is unnervingly perfect—it hardly feels lived in. But it’s interesting to see how different groups of people go about creating their personal utopia, and in the case of Ocean Grove they have been successful and are still going strong.

Guide note: Although bathing by the shore is now permitted on Sundays, the hours are limited. The beach is open from 9:30am-5:30pm Mon-Sat and 12:30-5:30pm on Sunday.

* * *

New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.

TOMORROWLAND - QUEENS, NEW YORK

In the New York City borough of Queens, the future was once on grand display. In 1939 and 1964, New York hosted the World’s Fairs at Flushing Meadows Corona Park. The events attracted millions of visitors to marvel at the epoch of innovation and industrialization. Today, the site and some structures from the 1964 exposition — dedicated to “Man’s Achievement on a Shrinking Globe in an Expanding Universe” — are still easily accessible, though rapidly showing their age.

A few buildings are still in use, such as The New York Hall of Science — a wonderful hands-on science museum with grounds decorated by rockets and quirky, retro, science-related sculptures. Walking through the park you can peek through the chain-link fence into the Queens Zoo and see a large geodesic dome that was built for the fair and now serves as an aviary. But surely the most interesting structures are the Unisphere and the sadly decaying Queens Theatre, which has fallen into disrepair, but still leaves an imposing impression. The park is a reminder of the optimism and excitement of the ’60s — when utopian futures seemed a sure and easy bet — and of how far we’ve come and how much further we have to go.

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New York City Guide LYDIA WHITE was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. Raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, she moved to Brooklyn in 2010. When not working as an interactive art director, she spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade.

Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.