LIVING LINES - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

Milwaukee resident Kenneth Kornacki sends along this photo dispatch sketching the lines of where the city lives - windows, homes, rooflines.

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info

PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *

Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com

CREAM CITY - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

Builders soon began to make use of the brick clay beds found in many parts of the state. … Along the east coast cream-colored brick was popular, especially in Milwaukee, which came to be known as the Cream City. For some decades cream brick was a common material for churches, homes, office buildings, breweries, and factories. 

Wisconsin, A Guide To the Badger State (WPA, 1941)

Ken Kornacki, your Guide to Milwaukee, tags in to American Guide Week with this image for Field Assignment #6 - Architecture.

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

SHADOW PEOPLE - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

…a nocturnal quiet…often produces the waggish comment, “You could fire a cannon down Wisconsin Avenue at midnight and never hit a soul!”

Wisconsin, A Guide To the Badger State (WPA, 1941) 

Milwaukee is a city of almost 600,000 people. It’s impossible to know them all and sometimes they all seem like strangers. Depending on the time of day, it seems like only a single person might walk down the street. There is a sort of hide-and-seek nature of encountering strangers in Milwaukee.

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info

CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 

When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.

What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.

The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.

Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.

For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.

* * *

Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.

CITY COLORS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

While nature may have the best spring colors, they aren’t the only colors in town. Now that the cold rains have ended, everything seems electric. The energy has returned to the area and the sidewalk cafes are filling up.

The 3rd Ward in Milwaukee is home to many art galleries and artist’s studios. On these bright, warm days the neighborhood is alive with people.

The cold, wet spring is just a fading memory now.

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

WISCONSIN IN SPRINGTIME - MILWAUKEE 

This winter was one of the longest and snowiest in recent memory. Spring is having a hard time getting on, with cold rain and wintry temperatures all over the upper Midwest. The first bulbs are up and the trees have turned from black to brown. Still, the shadows have retreating snow in them — too cold for the last of the snow to melt. This is spring’s ugly first act, with the explosions of color waiting in the wings.

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

SIGNS OF LIFE - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 

In the built environment, signs are ubiquitous and mostly spell out the names of products or the places where products can be purchased.

There was a time when actual human names were permanently displayed upon the facades of buildings. There was an optimism in these named buildings and they were built by craftsmen to last throughout the ages.

While some of these buildings survive, others have been destroyed to make way for more temporary structures without names. Perhaps part of the effort to preserve old buildings is because they have names like ours. They remind us of the human effort and pride that went into their construction.

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

Our friend at milwaukier-than-thou shares scenes of discarded or disregarded locations around Milwaukee by artist Sarah Luther. 

From the exhibition catalog of a recent gallery show

Luther has spent the past year exploring hundreds of abandoned plots, eventually selecting five pieces of land for their particular feel, interest, or beauty. She then memorialized each plot in a field guide. The guides ponder the land’s history, surrounding neighborhood, points of interest or curiosity—and then ask how each plot could be transformed into a public space.

Luther’s work seeks to appreciate and explore the often overlooked everyday scenes of the city. We like that idea. For more on Luther, and images of her micro-guides, check out this profile from Urban Milwaukee.

Aptly named Wisconsinite Evelyn Brewer’s #AmericanGuideWeek dispatch on what’s made Milwaukee famous.

Evelyn says:

As we head into the season we’re known for, the dreaded dreary winter, I wanted to take a moment to reflect upon the real gem of Wisconsin: Milwaukee in summertime. A time of never ending festivals celebrating the music and culture of all walks of life, when the beer flows freely, and the shores of Lake Michigan come alive with sports competitions, kite flying, and general beach bummery. Those three precious and vibrant months feel like one big celebration of life, and I’m pretty sure that’s what gets us Wisconsinites through our long, harsh winters. That and more beer.