THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info

THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI

Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.

Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.

Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)

What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.

Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.

* * *

Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.

ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.

Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors the
idea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 

That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.

* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi. Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi. Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi. Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY - COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY, long known as Odd Fellows Cemetery, 4th St. (R) facing 13th Ave. S., is situated on land purchased by the Odd Fellows in 1849 for recreational purposes. During the War between the States the 18 acres were converted into a cemetery. The first burials were of soldiers who fell at Shiloh. Under the magnolias are the graves of about 100 Federal and 1,500 Confederate soldiers, whose names were recorded in a book since lost. Now all graves are “unknown,” and so marked on the more than 1,000 headstones set up by the War Department in 1931. In one corner of the cemetery is a faded red brick vault—the grave of William Cocke, Revolutionary War veteran, legislator of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Mississippi.

Memorial Day had its origin in this cemetery on April 26, 1866. The ladies of Columbus met and marched in procession to the burial ground, where they cleared and decorated with flowers the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers. This act inspired Francis Miles Finch’s poem, “The Blue and the Gray.” April 26, not the nationally recognized May 30, is still Decoration Day in Mississippi.

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Several of the grave markers have been overtaken completely by majestic Southern magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the tree that serves double duty as both the state tree and the state flower. Slowly growing around the marble monuments left for people that were forgotten to time. In a way, a fitting and honorable reminder of how much things have changed, how slow that change has been and how much we have left to make right.


* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

WAYNESBORO, MISSISSIPPI
Waynesboro, Mississippi (pop. 5,197), is the county seat of Wayne County in Southeastern Mississippi and is home to the Waynesboro Whistle Stop Festival, an arts and crafts festival celebrating the history of Waynesboro. The forest products industry is still a large part of the economy, there are several sawmills, veneer and plywood plants that make up the community. Two major US Highways cross in town, US 45 and US 84, making it a prime location to ship goods throughout Mississippi and into Alabama.
The original WPA guidebook to the Magnolia State had little to say about Waynesboro itself, but what was once an attraction there had a special story:

Right on this road to the unexplored PITTS CAVE, 1 m., on the Pitts farm. The cave, with its entrance in the side of a hill, is a limestone formation. A number of stories are associated with the place. An Indian, said to have lost his dog in the cave, went in after it and was never seen again. Some say his skull was found years later. The dog, it is asserted, came out at another entrance with its body stripped clean of hair by the limestone gases. Another story has it that a Confederate detachment, pursued by the enemy, took refuge in the cave. The most enthralling story, however, is that of the exploration made by Capt. L. S. Pitts, father of the present owner, who many years ago decided to investigate the cave, using twine and candles in a Tom Sawyer manner. After four candles had been burned, Pitts was at the end of his twine and gave up his search for the end of the cave. He had traveled, he estimated, three miles. When he emerged, his eyes and face were swollen from the gas. Pitts believed the cave went under Chickasawhay River, for at a certain point in his trip he could hear running water above him. The river is about a mile in a direct line from the mouth of the cave.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WAYNESBORO, MISSISSIPPI
Waynesboro, Mississippi (pop. 5,197), is the county seat of Wayne County in Southeastern Mississippi and is home to the Waynesboro Whistle Stop Festival, an arts and crafts festival celebrating the history of Waynesboro. The forest products industry is still a large part of the economy, there are several sawmills, veneer and plywood plants that make up the community. Two major US Highways cross in town, US 45 and US 84, making it a prime location to ship goods throughout Mississippi and into Alabama.
The original WPA guidebook to the Magnolia State had little to say about Waynesboro itself, but what was once an attraction there had a special story:

Right on this road to the unexplored PITTS CAVE, 1 m., on the Pitts farm. The cave, with its entrance in the side of a hill, is a limestone formation. A number of stories are associated with the place. An Indian, said to have lost his dog in the cave, went in after it and was never seen again. Some say his skull was found years later. The dog, it is asserted, came out at another entrance with its body stripped clean of hair by the limestone gases. Another story has it that a Confederate detachment, pursued by the enemy, took refuge in the cave. The most enthralling story, however, is that of the exploration made by Capt. L. S. Pitts, father of the present owner, who many years ago decided to investigate the cave, using twine and candles in a Tom Sawyer manner. After four candles had been burned, Pitts was at the end of his twine and gave up his search for the end of the cave. He had traveled, he estimated, three miles. When he emerged, his eyes and face were swollen from the gas. Pitts believed the cave went under Chickasawhay River, for at a certain point in his trip he could hear running water above him. The river is about a mile in a direct line from the mouth of the cave.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

WAYNESBORO, MISSISSIPPI

Waynesboro, Mississippi (pop. 5,197), is the county seat of Wayne County in Southeastern Mississippi and is home to the Waynesboro Whistle Stop Festival, an arts and crafts festival celebrating the history of Waynesboro. The forest products industry is still a large part of the economy, there are several sawmills, veneer and plywood plants that make up the community. Two major US Highways cross in town, US 45 and US 84, making it a prime location to ship goods throughout Mississippi and into Alabama.

The original WPA guidebook to the Magnolia State had little to say about Waynesboro itself, but what was once an attraction there had a special story:

Right on this road to the unexplored PITTS CAVE, 1 m., on the Pitts farm. The cave, with its entrance in the side of a hill, is a limestone formation. A number of stories are associated with the place. An Indian, said to have lost his dog in the cave, went in after it and was never seen again. Some say his skull was found years later. The dog, it is asserted, came out at another entrance with its body stripped clean of hair by the limestone gases. Another story has it that a Confederate detachment, pursued by the enemy, took refuge in the cave. The most enthralling story, however, is that of the exploration made by Capt. L. S. Pitts, father of the present owner, who many years ago decided to investigate the cave, using twine and candles in a Tom Sawyer manner. After four candles had been burned, Pitts was at the end of his twine and gave up his search for the end of the cave. He had traveled, he estimated, three miles. When he emerged, his eyes and face were swollen from the gas. Pitts believed the cave went under Chickasawhay River, for at a certain point in his trip he could hear running water above him. The river is about a mile in a direct line from the mouth of the cave.

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

MISSISSIPPI RIVER - MINNESOTA 

When the Mississippi flows down, it spreads out over the broad valley making countless bayous of marshland, surrounding innumerable islands, while above its banks bluffs and hills with rounded, pointed, or squared contours, rise against the sky to form an idyllic back drop for the cities lying at its level.
—Minnesota: A State Guide (WPA, 1938)

True-blue Minnesotan Marianne McNamara writes about growing up around the Mississippi River in the Land of 10,000 Lakes for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #8: Waterways.
It is a river made up of North to South identities. There’s a Minnesota Mississippi. A Wisconsin Mississippi. An Iowa Mississippi. Illinois. Missouri. Kentucky. Tennessee. Arkansas. A Mississippi Mississippi. And a Louisiana Mississippi. This is the Minnesota Mississippi: 

Back in  the 1950s, when I was a girl, my family headed “Up North” for our summer vacations. In Minnesota, Up North is where people go to get away from the city. Not the mountains, not the shore. Up North is thousands of cabins on hundreds of lakes, surrounded by miles of forests, bogs and prairie. Perfect for fishing, swimming and just getting away from it all. We visited some of the familiar towns mentioned in my sixth grade Minnesota history book: Bemidji (home of legendary giants Paul Bunyan and Babe, the blue ox), Alexandria, Duluth (port city on Lake Superior), Park Rapids. 
One of the most memorable experiences from our travels was a stop at Itasca State Park, headwaters of the mighty Mississippi River. I thought I knew the size of the river because it flowed through Saint Paul, near my grandmother’s house, on its long, 2,500 mile journey to the Gulf of Mexico. It was wide and deep, with a strong current. But at Itasca, the Mississippi began as a shallow stream at the north end of Lake Itasca. I splashed across the ankle-deep river waters with my brothers.
The Mississippi has flowed through Minnesota for more than a million years. Known as the state of 10,000 lakes, the land was shaped during the Wisconsin period of the Great Ice Age, about 75,000 years ago. Powerful glaciers carved out rock formations creating the beds and valleys of Minnesota’s modern day lakes and rivers, including the Mississippi. Saint Paul, the state’s capitol and second most populous city (behind Minneapolis), was built on a series of bluffs rising up from the river to the surrounding plains.
Today, I live in Saint Paul, just a few miles from the Mississippi. I have always considered the Mississippi my river, just as I consider Minnesota my state and Saint Paul my hometown. I have great respect for the river and love her spectacular beauty. 
In the fall, I would argue there’s not a prettier sight anywhere than the banks of the Mississippi, right here in my hometown, when the sugar maples and sumacs flame red, orange and yellow.

Editor’s Note: Marianne McNamara is mom to one half of the A/G co-editor duo and mom-in-law to the other half. 
* * *
Marianne McNamara is a retired jack of all trades turned writer living in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Find her at auntshoe.blogspot.com.
Zoom Info
MISSISSIPPI RIVER - MINNESOTA 

When the Mississippi flows down, it spreads out over the broad valley making countless bayous of marshland, surrounding innumerable islands, while above its banks bluffs and hills with rounded, pointed, or squared contours, rise against the sky to form an idyllic back drop for the cities lying at its level.
—Minnesota: A State Guide (WPA, 1938)

True-blue Minnesotan Marianne McNamara writes about growing up around the Mississippi River in the Land of 10,000 Lakes for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #8: Waterways.
It is a river made up of North to South identities. There’s a Minnesota Mississippi. A Wisconsin Mississippi. An Iowa Mississippi. Illinois. Missouri. Kentucky. Tennessee. Arkansas. A Mississippi Mississippi. And a Louisiana Mississippi. This is the Minnesota Mississippi: 

Back in  the 1950s, when I was a girl, my family headed “Up North” for our summer vacations. In Minnesota, Up North is where people go to get away from the city. Not the mountains, not the shore. Up North is thousands of cabins on hundreds of lakes, surrounded by miles of forests, bogs and prairie. Perfect for fishing, swimming and just getting away from it all. We visited some of the familiar towns mentioned in my sixth grade Minnesota history book: Bemidji (home of legendary giants Paul Bunyan and Babe, the blue ox), Alexandria, Duluth (port city on Lake Superior), Park Rapids. 
One of the most memorable experiences from our travels was a stop at Itasca State Park, headwaters of the mighty Mississippi River. I thought I knew the size of the river because it flowed through Saint Paul, near my grandmother’s house, on its long, 2,500 mile journey to the Gulf of Mexico. It was wide and deep, with a strong current. But at Itasca, the Mississippi began as a shallow stream at the north end of Lake Itasca. I splashed across the ankle-deep river waters with my brothers.
The Mississippi has flowed through Minnesota for more than a million years. Known as the state of 10,000 lakes, the land was shaped during the Wisconsin period of the Great Ice Age, about 75,000 years ago. Powerful glaciers carved out rock formations creating the beds and valleys of Minnesota’s modern day lakes and rivers, including the Mississippi. Saint Paul, the state’s capitol and second most populous city (behind Minneapolis), was built on a series of bluffs rising up from the river to the surrounding plains.
Today, I live in Saint Paul, just a few miles from the Mississippi. I have always considered the Mississippi my river, just as I consider Minnesota my state and Saint Paul my hometown. I have great respect for the river and love her spectacular beauty. 
In the fall, I would argue there’s not a prettier sight anywhere than the banks of the Mississippi, right here in my hometown, when the sugar maples and sumacs flame red, orange and yellow.

Editor’s Note: Marianne McNamara is mom to one half of the A/G co-editor duo and mom-in-law to the other half. 
* * *
Marianne McNamara is a retired jack of all trades turned writer living in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Find her at auntshoe.blogspot.com.
Zoom Info
MISSISSIPPI RIVER - MINNESOTA 

When the Mississippi flows down, it spreads out over the broad valley making countless bayous of marshland, surrounding innumerable islands, while above its banks bluffs and hills with rounded, pointed, or squared contours, rise against the sky to form an idyllic back drop for the cities lying at its level.
—Minnesota: A State Guide (WPA, 1938)

True-blue Minnesotan Marianne McNamara writes about growing up around the Mississippi River in the Land of 10,000 Lakes for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #8: Waterways.
It is a river made up of North to South identities. There’s a Minnesota Mississippi. A Wisconsin Mississippi. An Iowa Mississippi. Illinois. Missouri. Kentucky. Tennessee. Arkansas. A Mississippi Mississippi. And a Louisiana Mississippi. This is the Minnesota Mississippi: 

Back in  the 1950s, when I was a girl, my family headed “Up North” for our summer vacations. In Minnesota, Up North is where people go to get away from the city. Not the mountains, not the shore. Up North is thousands of cabins on hundreds of lakes, surrounded by miles of forests, bogs and prairie. Perfect for fishing, swimming and just getting away from it all. We visited some of the familiar towns mentioned in my sixth grade Minnesota history book: Bemidji (home of legendary giants Paul Bunyan and Babe, the blue ox), Alexandria, Duluth (port city on Lake Superior), Park Rapids. 
One of the most memorable experiences from our travels was a stop at Itasca State Park, headwaters of the mighty Mississippi River. I thought I knew the size of the river because it flowed through Saint Paul, near my grandmother’s house, on its long, 2,500 mile journey to the Gulf of Mexico. It was wide and deep, with a strong current. But at Itasca, the Mississippi began as a shallow stream at the north end of Lake Itasca. I splashed across the ankle-deep river waters with my brothers.
The Mississippi has flowed through Minnesota for more than a million years. Known as the state of 10,000 lakes, the land was shaped during the Wisconsin period of the Great Ice Age, about 75,000 years ago. Powerful glaciers carved out rock formations creating the beds and valleys of Minnesota’s modern day lakes and rivers, including the Mississippi. Saint Paul, the state’s capitol and second most populous city (behind Minneapolis), was built on a series of bluffs rising up from the river to the surrounding plains.
Today, I live in Saint Paul, just a few miles from the Mississippi. I have always considered the Mississippi my river, just as I consider Minnesota my state and Saint Paul my hometown. I have great respect for the river and love her spectacular beauty. 
In the fall, I would argue there’s not a prettier sight anywhere than the banks of the Mississippi, right here in my hometown, when the sugar maples and sumacs flame red, orange and yellow.

Editor’s Note: Marianne McNamara is mom to one half of the A/G co-editor duo and mom-in-law to the other half. 
* * *
Marianne McNamara is a retired jack of all trades turned writer living in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Find her at auntshoe.blogspot.com.
Zoom Info

MISSISSIPPI RIVER - MINNESOTA 

When the Mississippi flows down, it spreads out over the broad valley making countless bayous of marshland, surrounding innumerable islands, while above its banks bluffs and hills with rounded, pointed, or squared contours, rise against the sky to form an idyllic back drop for the cities lying at its level.

Minnesota: A State Guide (WPA, 1938)

True-blue Minnesotan Marianne McNamara writes about growing up around the Mississippi River in the Land of 10,000 Lakes for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #8: Waterways.

It is a river made up of North to South identities. There’s a Minnesota Mississippi. A Wisconsin Mississippi. An Iowa Mississippi. Illinois. Missouri. Kentucky. Tennessee. Arkansas. A Mississippi Mississippi. And a Louisiana Mississippi. This is the Minnesota Mississippi: 

Back in  the 1950s, when I was a girl, my family headed “Up North” for our summer vacations. In Minnesota, Up North is where people go to get away from the city. Not the mountains, not the shore. Up North is thousands of cabins on hundreds of lakes, surrounded by miles of forests, bogs and prairie. Perfect for fishing, swimming and just getting away from it all. We visited some of the familiar towns mentioned in my sixth grade Minnesota history book: Bemidji (home of legendary giants Paul Bunyan and Babe, the blue ox), Alexandria, Duluth (port city on Lake Superior), Park Rapids. 

One of the most memorable experiences from our travels was a stop at Itasca State Park, headwaters of the mighty Mississippi River. I thought I knew the size of the river because it flowed through Saint Paul, near my grandmother’s house, on its long, 2,500 mile journey to the Gulf of Mexico. It was wide and deep, with a strong current. But at Itasca, the Mississippi began as a shallow stream at the north end of Lake Itasca. I splashed across the ankle-deep river waters with my brothers.

The Mississippi has flowed through Minnesota for more than a million years. Known as the state of 10,000 lakes, the land was shaped during the Wisconsin period of the Great Ice Age, about 75,000 years ago. Powerful glaciers carved out rock formations creating the beds and valleys of Minnesota’s modern day lakes and rivers, including the Mississippi. Saint Paul, the state’s capitol and second most populous city (behind Minneapolis), was built on a series of bluffs rising up from the river to the surrounding plains.

Today, I live in Saint Paul, just a few miles from the Mississippi. I have always considered the Mississippi my river, just as I consider Minnesota my state and Saint Paul my hometown. I have great respect for the river and love her spectacular beauty. 

In the fall, I would argue there’s not a prettier sight anywhere than the banks of the Mississippi, right here in my hometown, when the sugar maples and sumacs flame red, orange and yellow.

Editor’s Note: Marianne McNamara is mom to one half of the A/G co-editor duo and mom-in-law to the other half. 

* * *

Marianne McNamara is a retired jack of all trades turned writer living in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Find her at auntshoe.blogspot.com.

A NICE YOUNG MAN - BOONEVILLE, MISSISSIPPI

Booneville, 24.5 m. (509 alt, 1,703 pop.), was the scene of an all-day fight between Hardee’s Confederate cavalry and Sheridan’s Federal roops, July 1, 1862, after the Army of the Mississippi had retreated from Corinth and was reorganizing at Tupelo.

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Well, it’s another humdinger from our friends at The Moth. This time, from northern Mississippi, comes the tale of a promise with low expectations for fulfillment. 

Happy American Guide Week! We’ve been sharing stories from all across the country - different states, cultures, and people.

To wrap things up, a classic from Wanda Bullard. Stories told on Wanda’s porch down southwere the inspiration for The Moth, and this story about her childhood in rural Mississippi is a favorite of ours.

* * *

The Moth is an acclaimed not-for-profit organization dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling. It is a celebration of both the raconteur, who breathes fire into true tales of ordinary life, and the storytelling novice who has lived through something extraordinary and yearns to share it. Find The Moth on Tumblr at moth-stories.tumblr.comsee/hear more on their website,  follow them on Twitter and like them on Facebook.

MISSISSIPPI DIRT

As long as farming was confined to the fairly level second bottom lands of these valleys, erosion was not a serious problem. However, after the land boom of the 1830’s, and with railroads to help solve the problem of transportation, new cotton farmers moved into the hills and basins of northern and central Mississippi, and erosion was aggravated to an extent which few economic historians have realized. Thus the first State geologist, Eugene Hilgard, writing of the country around Oxford in the 1850’s, noticed that: “Even the present generation is rife with complaints about the exhaustion of the soils—in a region which, thirty years ago, had but just received the first scratch of the plowshare.”
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

David Jones, your Guide to Mississippi got some dirt under his nails to send this dispatch for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

The soil of Mississippi is rich and deep in most places. Though not as deep as it was once before.

* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

MISSISSIPPI DIRT

As long as farming was confined to the fairly level second bottom lands of these valleys, erosion was not a serious problem. However, after the land boom of the 1830’s, and with railroads to help solve the problem of transportation, new cotton farmers moved into the hills and basins of northern and central Mississippi, and erosion was aggravated to an extent which few economic historians have realized. Thus the first State geologist, Eugene Hilgard, writing of the country around Oxford in the 1850’s, noticed that: “Even the present generation is rife with complaints about the exhaustion of the soils—in a region which, thirty years ago, had but just received the first scratch of the plowshare.”

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

David Jones, your Guide to Mississippi got some dirt under his nails to send this dispatch for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

The soil of Mississippi is rich and deep in most places. Though not as deep as it was once before.

* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

WEST POINT, MISSISSIPPI

WEST POINT, 41 m. (241 alt., 4,677 pop.), a roomy, prosperous town fed by the farms and dairies of the surrounding flat lands, epitomizes the prairie. … Though a battleground during the War between the States, the town, that once had moved itself from the extreme corner of the county to be on the new railroad, was considered so attractive by a number of Federal officers that they came back after the war and settled here permanently. 
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Every Labor Day Weekend, in the town of West Point, Mississippi there are two events held. On Friday night is the Howlin’ Wolf Memorial Blues Festival, followed by the Prairie Arts Festival on Saturday. Both events help celebrate the art and culture of the area, which is deep and rich like the soil that built many of the towns. Many industries have come and gone in West Point, from sawmills to a meat processing plant and town residents have had to deal with the impacts of economic factors outside of the region. Through it all, West Point has maintained its identity and embraced the things that make it great. Each year both festivals increase in size and notoriety, showcasing the diversity that makes Mississippi increasingly important in our country.
Guide notes: 
Blues legend Howlin’ Wolf was born just north of West Point and the city instituted the blues festival in his honor in 1995. For more information, visit West Point’s website.
The Prairie Arts Festival is held annually on the Saturday before Labor Day. It features arts and crafts, Mississippi cooking, a 5k race and a car show. Visit the city website for more information.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WEST POINT, MISSISSIPPI

WEST POINT, 41 m. (241 alt., 4,677 pop.), a roomy, prosperous town fed by the farms and dairies of the surrounding flat lands, epitomizes the prairie. … Though a battleground during the War between the States, the town, that once had moved itself from the extreme corner of the county to be on the new railroad, was considered so attractive by a number of Federal officers that they came back after the war and settled here permanently. 
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Every Labor Day Weekend, in the town of West Point, Mississippi there are two events held. On Friday night is the Howlin’ Wolf Memorial Blues Festival, followed by the Prairie Arts Festival on Saturday. Both events help celebrate the art and culture of the area, which is deep and rich like the soil that built many of the towns. Many industries have come and gone in West Point, from sawmills to a meat processing plant and town residents have had to deal with the impacts of economic factors outside of the region. Through it all, West Point has maintained its identity and embraced the things that make it great. Each year both festivals increase in size and notoriety, showcasing the diversity that makes Mississippi increasingly important in our country.
Guide notes: 
Blues legend Howlin’ Wolf was born just north of West Point and the city instituted the blues festival in his honor in 1995. For more information, visit West Point’s website.
The Prairie Arts Festival is held annually on the Saturday before Labor Day. It features arts and crafts, Mississippi cooking, a 5k race and a car show. Visit the city website for more information.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WEST POINT, MISSISSIPPI

WEST POINT, 41 m. (241 alt., 4,677 pop.), a roomy, prosperous town fed by the farms and dairies of the surrounding flat lands, epitomizes the prairie. … Though a battleground during the War between the States, the town, that once had moved itself from the extreme corner of the county to be on the new railroad, was considered so attractive by a number of Federal officers that they came back after the war and settled here permanently. 
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Every Labor Day Weekend, in the town of West Point, Mississippi there are two events held. On Friday night is the Howlin’ Wolf Memorial Blues Festival, followed by the Prairie Arts Festival on Saturday. Both events help celebrate the art and culture of the area, which is deep and rich like the soil that built many of the towns. Many industries have come and gone in West Point, from sawmills to a meat processing plant and town residents have had to deal with the impacts of economic factors outside of the region. Through it all, West Point has maintained its identity and embraced the things that make it great. Each year both festivals increase in size and notoriety, showcasing the diversity that makes Mississippi increasingly important in our country.
Guide notes: 
Blues legend Howlin’ Wolf was born just north of West Point and the city instituted the blues festival in his honor in 1995. For more information, visit West Point’s website.
The Prairie Arts Festival is held annually on the Saturday before Labor Day. It features arts and crafts, Mississippi cooking, a 5k race and a car show. Visit the city website for more information.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WEST POINT, MISSISSIPPI

WEST POINT, 41 m. (241 alt., 4,677 pop.), a roomy, prosperous town fed by the farms and dairies of the surrounding flat lands, epitomizes the prairie. … Though a battleground during the War between the States, the town, that once had moved itself from the extreme corner of the county to be on the new railroad, was considered so attractive by a number of Federal officers that they came back after the war and settled here permanently. 
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Every Labor Day Weekend, in the town of West Point, Mississippi there are two events held. On Friday night is the Howlin’ Wolf Memorial Blues Festival, followed by the Prairie Arts Festival on Saturday. Both events help celebrate the art and culture of the area, which is deep and rich like the soil that built many of the towns. Many industries have come and gone in West Point, from sawmills to a meat processing plant and town residents have had to deal with the impacts of economic factors outside of the region. Through it all, West Point has maintained its identity and embraced the things that make it great. Each year both festivals increase in size and notoriety, showcasing the diversity that makes Mississippi increasingly important in our country.
Guide notes: 
Blues legend Howlin’ Wolf was born just north of West Point and the city instituted the blues festival in his honor in 1995. For more information, visit West Point’s website.
The Prairie Arts Festival is held annually on the Saturday before Labor Day. It features arts and crafts, Mississippi cooking, a 5k race and a car show. Visit the city website for more information.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WEST POINT, MISSISSIPPI

WEST POINT, 41 m. (241 alt., 4,677 pop.), a roomy, prosperous town fed by the farms and dairies of the surrounding flat lands, epitomizes the prairie. … Though a battleground during the War between the States, the town, that once had moved itself from the extreme corner of the county to be on the new railroad, was considered so attractive by a number of Federal officers that they came back after the war and settled here permanently. 
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Every Labor Day Weekend, in the town of West Point, Mississippi there are two events held. On Friday night is the Howlin’ Wolf Memorial Blues Festival, followed by the Prairie Arts Festival on Saturday. Both events help celebrate the art and culture of the area, which is deep and rich like the soil that built many of the towns. Many industries have come and gone in West Point, from sawmills to a meat processing plant and town residents have had to deal with the impacts of economic factors outside of the region. Through it all, West Point has maintained its identity and embraced the things that make it great. Each year both festivals increase in size and notoriety, showcasing the diversity that makes Mississippi increasingly important in our country.
Guide notes: 
Blues legend Howlin’ Wolf was born just north of West Point and the city instituted the blues festival in his honor in 1995. For more information, visit West Point’s website.
The Prairie Arts Festival is held annually on the Saturday before Labor Day. It features arts and crafts, Mississippi cooking, a 5k race and a car show. Visit the city website for more information.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WEST POINT, MISSISSIPPI

WEST POINT, 41 m. (241 alt., 4,677 pop.), a roomy, prosperous town fed by the farms and dairies of the surrounding flat lands, epitomizes the prairie. … Though a battleground during the War between the States, the town, that once had moved itself from the extreme corner of the county to be on the new railroad, was considered so attractive by a number of Federal officers that they came back after the war and settled here permanently. 
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Every Labor Day Weekend, in the town of West Point, Mississippi there are two events held. On Friday night is the Howlin’ Wolf Memorial Blues Festival, followed by the Prairie Arts Festival on Saturday. Both events help celebrate the art and culture of the area, which is deep and rich like the soil that built many of the towns. Many industries have come and gone in West Point, from sawmills to a meat processing plant and town residents have had to deal with the impacts of economic factors outside of the region. Through it all, West Point has maintained its identity and embraced the things that make it great. Each year both festivals increase in size and notoriety, showcasing the diversity that makes Mississippi increasingly important in our country.
Guide notes: 
Blues legend Howlin’ Wolf was born just north of West Point and the city instituted the blues festival in his honor in 1995. For more information, visit West Point’s website.
The Prairie Arts Festival is held annually on the Saturday before Labor Day. It features arts and crafts, Mississippi cooking, a 5k race and a car show. Visit the city website for more information.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

WEST POINT, MISSISSIPPI

WEST POINT, 41 m. (241 alt., 4,677 pop.), a roomy, prosperous town fed by the farms and dairies of the surrounding flat lands, epitomizes the prairie. … Though a battleground during the War between the States, the town, that once had moved itself from the extreme corner of the county to be on the new railroad, was considered so attractive by a number of Federal officers that they came back after the war and settled here permanently. 

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Every Labor Day Weekend, in the town of West Point, Mississippi there are two events held. On Friday night is the Howlin’ Wolf Memorial Blues Festival, followed by the Prairie Arts Festival on Saturday. Both events help celebrate the art and culture of the area, which is deep and rich like the soil that built many of the towns. Many industries have come and gone in West Point, from sawmills to a meat processing plant and town residents have had to deal with the impacts of economic factors outside of the region. Through it all, West Point has maintained its identity and embraced the things that make it great. Each year both festivals increase in size and notoriety, showcasing the diversity that makes Mississippi increasingly important in our country.

Guide notes: 

  • Blues legend Howlin’ Wolf was born just north of West Point and the city instituted the blues festival in his honor in 1995. For more information, visit West Point’s website.
  • The Prairie Arts Festival is held annually on the Saturday before Labor Day. It features arts and crafts, Mississippi cooking, a 5k race and a car show. Visit the city website for more information.

* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

MISSISSIPPI PAST AND PRESENT - WHAT IS MISSISSIPPI?

WERE a person to ask, “What is Mississippi?” he undoubtedly would be told, “It is a farming State where nearly everyone who may vote votes the Democratic ticket,” or “It is a place where half the population is Negro and the remainder is Anglo-Saxon,” or, more vaguely, “That is where everybody grows cotton on land which only a few of them own.”
— Mississippi: A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

When you meet someone new in Mississippi, you are asked three things: Where are you from? Who are your parents? And where do you go to church? The order changes depending on where you are in the state, and younger generations may substitute one or more questions depending on the first question. To pretend that many of the divisions presented in the 1938 WPA guide book have disappeared with time would be a fallacy. To be fair some of them have, but new ones have been created to fill the void by many that can’t let go of the old ways. To write off the whole state because of the past and those that haven’t progressed would be a disservice to those who fought to change things and to those who choose not to follow in the missteps, hatred and ignorance that came before. 
Many of the places of interest in the original guide book are gone, like the Columbus Marble Plant (pictured second from the top), touted as “the largest plant of its kind in the South,” or even the bridge over the Tombigbee River (pictured third) that has been left in place, but has been bypassed by a bridge of a newer design (the old bridge is being reworked as a pedestrian path across the river). Cotton has been replaced by soybeans, the timber that was said to have been over cut has recovered, and farming of catfish has replaced commercial fishing of the species.
Depending on the town you’re in, you can see a roller derby bout, buy beer on Sunday, and meet people that respect you for being you, no matter where you’re from, who your parents are, or if you go to church.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
MISSISSIPPI PAST AND PRESENT - WHAT IS MISSISSIPPI?

WERE a person to ask, “What is Mississippi?” he undoubtedly would be told, “It is a farming State where nearly everyone who may vote votes the Democratic ticket,” or “It is a place where half the population is Negro and the remainder is Anglo-Saxon,” or, more vaguely, “That is where everybody grows cotton on land which only a few of them own.”
— Mississippi: A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

When you meet someone new in Mississippi, you are asked three things: Where are you from? Who are your parents? And where do you go to church? The order changes depending on where you are in the state, and younger generations may substitute one or more questions depending on the first question. To pretend that many of the divisions presented in the 1938 WPA guide book have disappeared with time would be a fallacy. To be fair some of them have, but new ones have been created to fill the void by many that can’t let go of the old ways. To write off the whole state because of the past and those that haven’t progressed would be a disservice to those who fought to change things and to those who choose not to follow in the missteps, hatred and ignorance that came before. 
Many of the places of interest in the original guide book are gone, like the Columbus Marble Plant (pictured second from the top), touted as “the largest plant of its kind in the South,” or even the bridge over the Tombigbee River (pictured third) that has been left in place, but has been bypassed by a bridge of a newer design (the old bridge is being reworked as a pedestrian path across the river). Cotton has been replaced by soybeans, the timber that was said to have been over cut has recovered, and farming of catfish has replaced commercial fishing of the species.
Depending on the town you’re in, you can see a roller derby bout, buy beer on Sunday, and meet people that respect you for being you, no matter where you’re from, who your parents are, or if you go to church.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
MISSISSIPPI PAST AND PRESENT - WHAT IS MISSISSIPPI?

WERE a person to ask, “What is Mississippi?” he undoubtedly would be told, “It is a farming State where nearly everyone who may vote votes the Democratic ticket,” or “It is a place where half the population is Negro and the remainder is Anglo-Saxon,” or, more vaguely, “That is where everybody grows cotton on land which only a few of them own.”
— Mississippi: A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

When you meet someone new in Mississippi, you are asked three things: Where are you from? Who are your parents? And where do you go to church? The order changes depending on where you are in the state, and younger generations may substitute one or more questions depending on the first question. To pretend that many of the divisions presented in the 1938 WPA guide book have disappeared with time would be a fallacy. To be fair some of them have, but new ones have been created to fill the void by many that can’t let go of the old ways. To write off the whole state because of the past and those that haven’t progressed would be a disservice to those who fought to change things and to those who choose not to follow in the missteps, hatred and ignorance that came before. 
Many of the places of interest in the original guide book are gone, like the Columbus Marble Plant (pictured second from the top), touted as “the largest plant of its kind in the South,” or even the bridge over the Tombigbee River (pictured third) that has been left in place, but has been bypassed by a bridge of a newer design (the old bridge is being reworked as a pedestrian path across the river). Cotton has been replaced by soybeans, the timber that was said to have been over cut has recovered, and farming of catfish has replaced commercial fishing of the species.
Depending on the town you’re in, you can see a roller derby bout, buy beer on Sunday, and meet people that respect you for being you, no matter where you’re from, who your parents are, or if you go to church.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
MISSISSIPPI PAST AND PRESENT - WHAT IS MISSISSIPPI?

WERE a person to ask, “What is Mississippi?” he undoubtedly would be told, “It is a farming State where nearly everyone who may vote votes the Democratic ticket,” or “It is a place where half the population is Negro and the remainder is Anglo-Saxon,” or, more vaguely, “That is where everybody grows cotton on land which only a few of them own.”
— Mississippi: A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

When you meet someone new in Mississippi, you are asked three things: Where are you from? Who are your parents? And where do you go to church? The order changes depending on where you are in the state, and younger generations may substitute one or more questions depending on the first question. To pretend that many of the divisions presented in the 1938 WPA guide book have disappeared with time would be a fallacy. To be fair some of them have, but new ones have been created to fill the void by many that can’t let go of the old ways. To write off the whole state because of the past and those that haven’t progressed would be a disservice to those who fought to change things and to those who choose not to follow in the missteps, hatred and ignorance that came before. 
Many of the places of interest in the original guide book are gone, like the Columbus Marble Plant (pictured second from the top), touted as “the largest plant of its kind in the South,” or even the bridge over the Tombigbee River (pictured third) that has been left in place, but has been bypassed by a bridge of a newer design (the old bridge is being reworked as a pedestrian path across the river). Cotton has been replaced by soybeans, the timber that was said to have been over cut has recovered, and farming of catfish has replaced commercial fishing of the species.
Depending on the town you’re in, you can see a roller derby bout, buy beer on Sunday, and meet people that respect you for being you, no matter where you’re from, who your parents are, or if you go to church.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

MISSISSIPPI PAST AND PRESENT - WHAT IS MISSISSIPPI?

WERE a person to ask, “What is Mississippi?” he undoubtedly would be told, “It is a farming State where nearly everyone who may vote votes the Democratic ticket,” or “It is a place where half the population is Negro and the remainder is Anglo-Saxon,” or, more vaguely, “That is where everybody grows cotton on land which only a few of them own.”

— Mississippi: A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

When you meet someone new in Mississippi, you are asked three things: Where are you from? Who are your parents? And where do you go to church? The order changes depending on where you are in the state, and younger generations may substitute one or more questions depending on the first question. To pretend that many of the divisions presented in the 1938 WPA guide book have disappeared with time would be a fallacy. To be fair some of them have, but new ones have been created to fill the void by many that can’t let go of the old ways. To write off the whole state because of the past and those that haven’t progressed would be a disservice to those who fought to change things and to those who choose not to follow in the missteps, hatred and ignorance that came before.

Many of the places of interest in the original guide book are gone, like the Columbus Marble Plant (pictured second from the top), touted as “the largest plant of its kind in the South,” or even the bridge over the Tombigbee River (pictured third) that has been left in place, but has been bypassed by a bridge of a newer design (the old bridge is being reworked as a pedestrian path across the river). Cotton has been replaced by soybeans, the timber that was said to have been over cut has recovered, and farming of catfish has replaced commercial fishing of the species.

Depending on the town you’re in, you can see a roller derby bout, buy beer on Sunday, and meet people that respect you for being you, no matter where you’re from, who your parents are, or if you go to church.

* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

BROOKHAVEN, MISSISSIPPI

BROOKHAVEN, has practically outlived its antebellum character and with its dairying interests has become a lively modern town. Until 1851, when it was the first northern terminus of the New Orleans & Great Southern R.R., Brookhaven was little more than a straggling group of plantations centered about the crossroads store of Samuel Jayne, who had settled here in 1818. With the advent of the railroad, it slowly took shape as a village of wealthy merchants who ensconced their families in great white-columned homes to live leisurely but formal social lives. Until 1907 it was a place where ladies never made calls without hats and gloves, where the blinds were drawn for afternoon siestas, where streets were unpaved and shadowy with the arching branches of live oak trees, and where the daily arrival of the train and the mail were events to be anticipated. In that year, however, Brookhaven broke with its staid past to pioneer in a new activity in the State. The creamery established here was the first in Mississippi. Today the town is the hub of southern Mississippi’s dairying country, supplying a great part of the milk products shipped to New Orleans. It has a well-knit business section and asphalt-paved streets; and sons and daughters have left outmoded rambling Colonial-style homes to follow every architectural fad in house building. Only burgeoning oaks and here and there a landmark are left as relics of the former easy village life.
— Mississippi, A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938) 

Brookhaven, Mississippi (pop. 12,520)—a town that keeps changing. 
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BROOKHAVEN, MISSISSIPPI

BROOKHAVEN, has practically outlived its antebellum character and with its dairying interests has become a lively modern town. Until 1851, when it was the first northern terminus of the New Orleans & Great Southern R.R., Brookhaven was little more than a straggling group of plantations centered about the crossroads store of Samuel Jayne, who had settled here in 1818. With the advent of the railroad, it slowly took shape as a village of wealthy merchants who ensconced their families in great white-columned homes to live leisurely but formal social lives. Until 1907 it was a place where ladies never made calls without hats and gloves, where the blinds were drawn for afternoon siestas, where streets were unpaved and shadowy with the arching branches of live oak trees, and where the daily arrival of the train and the mail were events to be anticipated. In that year, however, Brookhaven broke with its staid past to pioneer in a new activity in the State. The creamery established here was the first in Mississippi. Today the town is the hub of southern Mississippi’s dairying country, supplying a great part of the milk products shipped to New Orleans. It has a well-knit business section and asphalt-paved streets; and sons and daughters have left outmoded rambling Colonial-style homes to follow every architectural fad in house building. Only burgeoning oaks and here and there a landmark are left as relics of the former easy village life.
— Mississippi, A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938) 

Brookhaven, Mississippi (pop. 12,520)—a town that keeps changing. 
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
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BROOKHAVEN, MISSISSIPPI

BROOKHAVEN, has practically outlived its antebellum character and with its dairying interests has become a lively modern town. Until 1851, when it was the first northern terminus of the New Orleans & Great Southern R.R., Brookhaven was little more than a straggling group of plantations centered about the crossroads store of Samuel Jayne, who had settled here in 1818. With the advent of the railroad, it slowly took shape as a village of wealthy merchants who ensconced their families in great white-columned homes to live leisurely but formal social lives. Until 1907 it was a place where ladies never made calls without hats and gloves, where the blinds were drawn for afternoon siestas, where streets were unpaved and shadowy with the arching branches of live oak trees, and where the daily arrival of the train and the mail were events to be anticipated. In that year, however, Brookhaven broke with its staid past to pioneer in a new activity in the State. The creamery established here was the first in Mississippi. Today the town is the hub of southern Mississippi’s dairying country, supplying a great part of the milk products shipped to New Orleans. It has a well-knit business section and asphalt-paved streets; and sons and daughters have left outmoded rambling Colonial-style homes to follow every architectural fad in house building. Only burgeoning oaks and here and there a landmark are left as relics of the former easy village life.
— Mississippi, A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938) 

Brookhaven, Mississippi (pop. 12,520)—a town that keeps changing. 
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BROOKHAVEN, MISSISSIPPI

BROOKHAVEN, has practically outlived its antebellum character and with its dairying interests has become a lively modern town. Until 1851, when it was the first northern terminus of the New Orleans & Great Southern R.R., Brookhaven was little more than a straggling group of plantations centered about the crossroads store of Samuel Jayne, who had settled here in 1818. With the advent of the railroad, it slowly took shape as a village of wealthy merchants who ensconced their families in great white-columned homes to live leisurely but formal social lives. Until 1907 it was a place where ladies never made calls without hats and gloves, where the blinds were drawn for afternoon siestas, where streets were unpaved and shadowy with the arching branches of live oak trees, and where the daily arrival of the train and the mail were events to be anticipated. In that year, however, Brookhaven broke with its staid past to pioneer in a new activity in the State. The creamery established here was the first in Mississippi. Today the town is the hub of southern Mississippi’s dairying country, supplying a great part of the milk products shipped to New Orleans. It has a well-knit business section and asphalt-paved streets; and sons and daughters have left outmoded rambling Colonial-style homes to follow every architectural fad in house building. Only burgeoning oaks and here and there a landmark are left as relics of the former easy village life.
— Mississippi, A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938) 

Brookhaven, Mississippi (pop. 12,520)—a town that keeps changing. 
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BROOKHAVEN, MISSISSIPPI

BROOKHAVEN, has practically outlived its antebellum character and with its dairying interests has become a lively modern town. Until 1851, when it was the first northern terminus of the New Orleans & Great Southern R.R., Brookhaven was little more than a straggling group of plantations centered about the crossroads store of Samuel Jayne, who had settled here in 1818. With the advent of the railroad, it slowly took shape as a village of wealthy merchants who ensconced their families in great white-columned homes to live leisurely but formal social lives. Until 1907 it was a place where ladies never made calls without hats and gloves, where the blinds were drawn for afternoon siestas, where streets were unpaved and shadowy with the arching branches of live oak trees, and where the daily arrival of the train and the mail were events to be anticipated. In that year, however, Brookhaven broke with its staid past to pioneer in a new activity in the State. The creamery established here was the first in Mississippi. Today the town is the hub of southern Mississippi’s dairying country, supplying a great part of the milk products shipped to New Orleans. It has a well-knit business section and asphalt-paved streets; and sons and daughters have left outmoded rambling Colonial-style homes to follow every architectural fad in house building. Only burgeoning oaks and here and there a landmark are left as relics of the former easy village life.
— Mississippi, A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938) 

Brookhaven, Mississippi (pop. 12,520)—a town that keeps changing. 
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BROOKHAVEN, MISSISSIPPI

BROOKHAVEN, has practically outlived its antebellum character and with its dairying interests has become a lively modern town. Until 1851, when it was the first northern terminus of the New Orleans & Great Southern R.R., Brookhaven was little more than a straggling group of plantations centered about the crossroads store of Samuel Jayne, who had settled here in 1818. With the advent of the railroad, it slowly took shape as a village of wealthy merchants who ensconced their families in great white-columned homes to live leisurely but formal social lives. Until 1907 it was a place where ladies never made calls without hats and gloves, where the blinds were drawn for afternoon siestas, where streets were unpaved and shadowy with the arching branches of live oak trees, and where the daily arrival of the train and the mail were events to be anticipated. In that year, however, Brookhaven broke with its staid past to pioneer in a new activity in the State. The creamery established here was the first in Mississippi. Today the town is the hub of southern Mississippi’s dairying country, supplying a great part of the milk products shipped to New Orleans. It has a well-knit business section and asphalt-paved streets; and sons and daughters have left outmoded rambling Colonial-style homes to follow every architectural fad in house building. Only burgeoning oaks and here and there a landmark are left as relics of the former easy village life.
— Mississippi, A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938) 

Brookhaven, Mississippi (pop. 12,520)—a town that keeps changing. 
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

BROOKHAVEN, MISSISSIPPI

BROOKHAVEN, has practically outlived its antebellum character and with its dairying interests has become a lively modern town. Until 1851, when it was the first northern terminus of the New Orleans & Great Southern R.R., Brookhaven was little more than a straggling group of plantations centered about the crossroads store of Samuel Jayne, who had settled here in 1818. With the advent of the railroad, it slowly took shape as a village of wealthy merchants who ensconced their families in great white-columned homes to live leisurely but formal social lives. Until 1907 it was a place where ladies never made calls without hats and gloves, where the blinds were drawn for afternoon siestas, where streets were unpaved and shadowy with the arching branches of live oak trees, and where the daily arrival of the train and the mail were events to be anticipated. In that year, however, Brookhaven broke with its staid past to pioneer in a new activity in the State. The creamery established here was the first in Mississippi. Today the town is the hub of southern Mississippi’s dairying country, supplying a great part of the milk products shipped to New Orleans. It has a well-knit business section and asphalt-paved streets; and sons and daughters have left outmoded rambling Colonial-style homes to follow every architectural fad in house building. Only burgeoning oaks and here and there a landmark are left as relics of the former easy village life.

Mississippi, A Guide to the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938) 

Brookhaven, Mississippi (pop. 12,520)—a town that keeps changing. 

* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.