FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
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FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
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FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info

FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.

Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *

Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.

LIBERTY TOOL CO. – LIBERTY, MAINE

There are many ways to get to Liberty, Maine, and that is why it takes so long. The 30-mile journey from coastal Rockland should take about 45 minutes, but when you leave the coastline and head inland, the bounty of the countryside and the infinite side roads are simply a temptation. It is too easy to forgo the direct route that your navigation system recommends and choose one of the more enticing side roads. And once you’ve made that first welcome detour it is like peeling an onion. It may be a bit more roundabout this way, but the scenery is worth it. In late winter you’ll also need to factor in the ubiquitous potholes and frost heaves that are incredibly unforgiving and require driving below the speed limit for intermittent stretches.

Along the way you may pass through the towns of Union, Freedom and Hope. Or countless others that are quiet and desolate and draw so little attention to themselves that you may not realize you’re passing through a town at all. It is typically a tall, steepled church or a small nondescript post office that betrays the town center.

Liberty, Maine is just such a town, only there are a couple things that set it apart. One is The Old Octagonal Post Office from 1870, which is hard to miss (and now on the national historical register - open on Saturdays in summer). The other is Liberty Tool Company, a large three-story building in the center of town.

Even on an empty Main Street in the middle of March it is clear this is the heart of the place. With a population of less than 1,000 and just a few commercial buildings, there is almost nothing else in Liberty to distract you from it. And once you’re inside, it is difficult to tear yourself away.

From the Liberty Tool website:

The Liberty Tool Company consists of a four-story balloon framed building built circa 1885. Until the Liberty Village General Store was constructed across the street in 1891 (it is six inches higher than the Liberty Tool Company), this building was the largest wooden structure between Belfast and Augusta. In the old days, Liberty was a main overnight stagecoach stop with a number of hotels, canneries, foundries and other enterprises. The Liberty Tool Co. building was a general store with a rooming house on the second floor and a dance hall on the third floor.

Today it is known for tools, specifically hand tools, and it is the largest second-hand tool store in New England. The first floor is simply overflowing with tools and hardware. Apparently they also likes to poke some fun: on a large wooden cabinet with 50-plus drawers, among the ordinary labeled drawers such as “Allen Wrenches” and “Door Hardware,” you’ll also find ones labeled “Left Handed Kanuter Pins,” “Peyote Buttons,” “Fig Newtons” and “Nuclear Waste.”

The second floor is more tools, but also books and more books. On the third floor—“Grandma’s Attic”—in addition to more tools you’ll also find antiques and curios, as well as a lending library. On a sunny day in July perhaps you’d be tempted to sit awhile and flip through one of the numerous titles available to you, but in mid-March with the outside temperature hovering at freezing, there is no incentive to stay too long in Grandma’s Attic as the inside temperature is also hovering at freezing. Despite the old adage that “heat rises,” that would not be the case at Liberty Tool. The oversized wood stove on the first floor does a wonderful job cranking out heat to about arm’s length, but from there the heat simply disappears like it does in all old buildings. Also, as the shopkeeper told me, all the metal tools do a great job of sucking up the heat so it can’t find its way upstairs.

There are few actual destinations among all these small towns in this interior piece of mid-coast Maine, but Liberty Tool is one worth finding, and if you’re anywhere remotely close the journey is absolutely worth making.

Guide note: Liberty Tool is located at 57 Main Street in Liberty, ME. Hours - Wednesday through Sunday, 9:00am-5:00pm; open at 7:30am on Saturdays; open by request on extreme cold weather days (call ahead).

* * *

Guide to the Northeast Brett Klein lives in Connecticut and works in New York, but prefers small town life and his home state of Maine. Any chance to get rural is a mental vacation. Follow Klein on Tumblr at The Coast is Clear. His curatorial collection of Americana, rural life, other artists and ephemera can be seen on Tumblr at Tons of Land.

MAINE TIMBER COUNTRY

The tree has symbolized the land, people, and wealth of the New England region long before Europeans stumbled onto its shores. The tree has been portrayed, as well, on countless New England maps, flags, and documents: official, sacred and mundane.

To put things in perspective, the first colonial coin featured a tree. The New England forest was claimed by the British Crown in the 17th century as timber became New England’s first big colonial calling card. Wood was of military import to the British Empire as a timber-starved England desperately needed wood ship masts for its ever-growing Navy. In fact, the first sawmill in North America was built in York, Maine, in 1623 for the express purpose of exporting lumber to England. The America timber industry was born as custom-built ships transported 100’ white pine ship masts and other lumber to the homeland in mass-market fashion. Nearly four hundred years later, the timber business continues to be a dynamic force on the Maine landscape, economy, and people.

From highways crowded with logging trucks to piles of timber stacked three stories high, it’s evident on the ground that timber is big business here. Almost 90 percent of the state of Maine is cover by forest and approximately 66 percent of the land is timberland. In 2005, the annual revenues from Maine’s forest topped $6 billion ($5.31 billion in forest-based manufacturing and $1.5 billion from forest-related recreation and tourism).

Beyond the dollars, timber benefits include stewardship of regional green space, wildlife habitat, and clean watersheds. The timber industry also offers a constant supply of environmental critique that range from chemicals used in the paper sector to woodland habitat loss.

Long gone are the days when unfortunate lumberjacks were buried in unmarked graves with their boots nailed to the nearest tree, but logging-related danger still looms on Maine’s back roads and highways. Ask any mother in Maine about heavily loaded, speeding logging trucks on local roads and you will be schooled.

Below the billboard issues lie the detail and cultural texture of living in a tree state. Abandoned skidders, landings, bottle cap clubs, nurse stumps, wood poaching, and wood pile contests are but a few of the cultural details of timber country. Logging roads and timber tracts provide the greatest cultural context, especially in terms of social and recreation opportunities. Their unintended use include hiking, bird watching, motocross, ski-dooing, and countless other wholesome outdoor activities. Far from prying eyes, these remote places host a bit of devious mischief, as well. Among other activities, quiet logging roads serve as popular under-age “drinking roads” — as evident by occasional trails of empty “road soda” cans. Such beer cans are but tiny shiny blips in the never-ending feedback loop between man and nature within the cultural landscape of America’s premier “Pine Tree State.”

Editor’s Note: David Buckley Borden is participating in the Boston Fun-A-Day 2014 project by developing 31, one-page landscape installation proposals during the month of January. The work is a freewheeling exploration of the New England landscape and our cultural love affair with the region’s “great outdoors.”

Follow Fun-A-Day Boston at http://funadayboston.tumblr.com/. And if you’re in the region, stop by the Fun-A-Day Boston 2014 show hosted by Voltage Coffee & Art (Opening Reception February 21st, 7-9pm; Show runs February 17th through April 5th).

* * *

David Buckley Borden is an artist, landscape designer (highly unlicensed landscape architect), and humorist hailing from the great state of New England. David’s art includes a variety of creative work ranging from landscape installations to silkscreen prints covering an even greater variety of interests in landscape architecture, all things “great outdoors,” and the past, present and future challenges to the lands of North America. Outside of work, when not leading his one-man campaign for sustainable cutis anserine americana, David can be found quietly playing in the dirt in and around his Cambridge, Massachusetts home.

Find more of his work at davidbuckleyborden.com, on Tumblr atdavidbuckleyborden.tumblr.com and follow him on instagram

ILLUSTRATED NEW ENGLAND
Not sure which of David Buckley Borden’s fantastic illustrations we first ran across, but whether it was the Masshole, the Demonym Map or one of his New England Ecological Engineers, we were hooked immediately. A landscape designer by day, David has a great Tumblr that we’ve been fans of for some time. To kick off 2014, he was kind enough to share some of his art and talk with us about how New England’s culture, landscape and ecology are reflected in his work.
AG: David, you’re originally from New England. We know it’s hard to describe where you’re from in just a few words, but what are one or two things the rest of the country (and/or New Englanders themselves) should know about the region? 
DBB: The New England forest was once clear-cut on an Amazonian magnitude. At the height of the region’s merino wool craze in the 1840s, approximately 70% of the New England landscape was cleared for pasture and agriculture. This sheep craze is just one example of the culture-driven landscape transformations the region has undergone in the course of its history. New England was arguably saved from the ecological disaster of sheep farming by another major cultural event: the Civil War and the subsequent opening of the West. All landscapes are created and experienced within a cultural context, and this is important to keep in mind when getting to know New England, or any other region for that matter.
AG: What draws you to explore the cultural landscapes of New England through the lens of art? How does where you’re from influence what you do? 
DBB: In my view, the human condition is a place-based experience and I’m exploring my place, New England, by way of art and design. Many of the ideas underlying my artwork are the same ideas I’m exploring in my landscape architecture practice. Part of my daily work is to analyze and communicate ideas related to landscape and this practice is often done through drawings. Still, the landscape architecture profession takes itself very seriously and operates on a long timeframe. My art is a creative counter to this; the artwork is created relatively quickly and is “light” in attitude, although no less informed. Because there are no clients to serve, my art allows me to explore my personal landscape-related interests including the nuances of being a native New Englander and the influence of place on the human experience.
AG: In several of your pieces, you combine cartography with the vernacular of New England. What is it about that intersection that interests you? Is there any sort of regional tradition along the same lines?  
DBB: There is a regional tradition of cartography, especially in the terms of New England’s colonial past. Many of the earliest documentations of New England were maps; maps of exploration, territory, resources, rivers, trade routes, etc. Beyond its history, I love cartography because it’s accessible. People know the language of maps. As a creative device, the map is an ancient, yet highly effective, communication tool that still resonates with folks, much like the vernacular of New England. Both cartography and the vernacular are relevant and meaningful to a broad cross section of people, which is of great interest to me as both an artist and a designer of the built environment.
AG: Your artwork draws from not only the cultural aspects of New England, but also its ecology, geology, etc.—elements that you work with as a landscape designer. How have you (re-)discovered the landscape around you through your illustration?
DBB: In terms of landscape, if geology is the bones, then ecology is the hair, skin and nails. And culture is the heart and soul. I work at the junction of man and nature. Much of my New England artwork can be boiled down to insights, commentary, or interesting facts about this intersection of landscape and culture. Some of my illustrations are project proposals, some are nerdy inside jokes, but all are exercises in learning about a landscape’s existing and/or proposed condition. In essence, my art is a means to understanding a place.
AG: With the Maine plaid and the preferred disruptive pattern material (DPMs), you delineate states using fabric tropes. We’re intrigued by the idea of regional fabrics. Talk to us about what plaid and camouflage represent to New Englanders and how they’re worn and used.
DBB: The term “urban fabric” is sometimes used in the urban planning and design field to describe the density, character and built condition of cities and suburbs. For example, a city with narrow streets and lots of densely built small buildings is said to have a tight fabric. Along these lines of thinking, I explore the fabrics of regional landscapes. So, what type of fabric would best describe the Maine woods in winter? A red and black Buffalo plaid seemed right to me.
Camouflage, also known as disruptive pattern material (DPM), is certainly a popular clothing pattern in New England. It is used on everything from snowmobiles to bikinis. Each prevalent camouflage pattern has a unique origin and its own set of cultural associations, including stereotypes. In the case of state identity, you can bet your wool mittens, New England is divided on the issue of camouflage preference… On the regional scale, each state possesses unique landscapes: the finger lakes in New Hampshire, the blue hills of Massachusetts, the swamps of Rhode Island, the valleys of Vermont, etcetera. Each landscape has its own distinct landscape ecology patterns and from 2000 feet above they reveal their own unique patterns, which often look like military issued camouflage patterns.
AG: One of the things we’re trying to explore in the American Guide is the persistence of regionalism. How do you see that playing out in New England?
DBB: The maple syrup bucket is half full. The type of regionalism that runs hand-in-hand with “place as tourist attraction” is alive and well in the town commons of New England. The type of regionalism that centers on a unique regional place-based way of life defiantly limps along. Market forces and transportation and communication technologies certainly challenge the regional character of New England, but there are forces greater than iPhones, cheap drywall and two-day shipping. In particular, people’s longing to be rooted in a place and their willingness to carry on family/local traditions are at the core of the persistence of regionalism.
AG: Are there any artists or designers you admire who similarly explored (or currently explore) New England regionalism?
DBB: New England has a rich art history and currently has a variety of thriving regional creative hubs: Portland (ME), Brattleboro (VT),   Peterborough (NH), Providence (RI), New Haven (CT) and my current hometown of Cambridge (MA). Some of the most influential “regional” artists to my creative work include Eric Sloane, Andrew Wyeth, Jon Piasecki, and my graduate school drawing instructor Anne McGee, who paints wonderfully insightful Fenway Park and Cape & Island scapes.
Although not artists per se, there are a number of influential New England-based writers who explore regionalism related topics in their work. These writers are the greatest influence on my fundamental understanding of the place-based experience and the complexity of cultural landscapes. My list is long, but three of the most powerful authors include Howard Mansfield (NH), John Stillgoe (MA), and Richard Forman (MA). And if I had to recommend just one book, it would be Stillgoe’s Outside Lies Magic: Regaining History and Awareness in Everyday Places. 
AG: Besides your Tumblr, where else can we find your work?
DBB: I’d like to welcome everyone to attend the group art show at the Aviary Gallery on January 2nd in Jamaica Plain, MA. The show, entitled BEST IN SHOW: An exhibition of art inspired by animals, both real & imagined runs through the end of the month. I have two animals in the show.
Beyond the animals exhibition, I’m currently developing an art installation at Bodega in Boston for March and am working with Trifecta Editions on a three-day art happening in May.
In the interim I’m participating in the Boston Fun-A-Day project by developing 31 one-page landscape installation proposals during the Month of January. The ultimate goal is to build a couple of these proposals in the field this summer. I encourage people to follow the daily progress of this project on my tumblr and instagram or my ol’ fashioned website.
Editor’s note: We’d definitely recommend checking out the Aviary Gallery show if you’re in the area. The Gallery is at 48 South Street in Jamaica Plain, MA and the opening reception is tomorrow, January 2nd from 6-9pm. Pets are welcome and a portion of the show’s proceeds will be donated to the Animal Rescue League of Boston. 
Illustrations in order of appearance - top to bottom, left to right:
1) Massachusetts’ Premiere Ecological Engineer - The Massachuset and Wampanoag tribes called the land I grew up in “Nanamooskeagin,” or “land of many beavers.” Sadly, the only castor canadensis I’ve seen in my hometown are found on the Abington town seal at the top of property tax bills. (Silkscreen print on 8 X 10” Rives BFK grey paper)
2) New England Demonym Map - Some times people name places. Other times places name people. (Mixed media: pencil, pen, watercolor, carbon transfer, photoshop touch. 8.5” X 11”, 2012)
3) Nurse Log- A familiar sight in the New England forest, the nurse log is essentially a fallen tree, covered with a layer of moss and organic debris. It provides a natural germination field for native species of shade loving plants. (Ink, graphite, colored pencil and carbon transfer on paper, 8.5 x 11”, Winter 2013) 
4) Maine Is Cold Map (Collage, Winter 2013)
5) Masshole, Circa 1620 A.D.  - The definition of a “masshole” is arguably as varied as the people of  Massachusetts. My personal perspective  is more concerned with local soil horizons than issues of poor driving manners or sour temperaments. (Two-color silkscreen print of this Masshole drawing available from Trifecta Editions)
6) Granite Love Letter - Installation Proposal:Life-sized fieldstone love note in the wild flower field on the southern hillside at Bobolink Farm in Harrisville, NH. Installation consists of 22 tons of dry-laid local granite field stone consisting of four stone fence inspired forms, laid out as “X O X O.”
7) Momma Said Knock You Out - The chestnut blight is a cruel organism; just as it appears the chestnut sapling has made its triumphant return and is going to shoot up to be a mighty tree of yore. It doesn’t. In the words of LL Cool J, “Don’t call it a comeback/I’ve been here for years”… a sad arrested state for a tree that once made up the majority of America’s total tree cover. (Pen, pencil, carbon transfer on paper, 8” X 10”, Spring 2011)
8) New England DPM Preference Map (Mixed media: Pen, pencil, acrylic paint, illustrator. Spring 2013)
* * *
David Buckley Borden is an artist, landscape designer (highly unlicensed landscape architect), and humorist hailing from the great state of New England. David’s art includes a variety of creative work ranging from landscape installations to silkscreen prints covering an even greater variety of interests in landscape architecture, all things “great outdoors,” and the past, present and future challenges to the lands of North America. Outside of work, when not leading his one-man campaign for sustainable cutis anserine americana, David can be found quietly playing in the dirt in and around his Cambridge, Massachusetts home.
Find more of his work at davidbuckleyborden.com, on Tumblr at davidbuckleyborden.tumblr.com and follow him on instagram. 
Zoom Info
ILLUSTRATED NEW ENGLAND
Not sure which of David Buckley Borden’s fantastic illustrations we first ran across, but whether it was the Masshole, the Demonym Map or one of his New England Ecological Engineers, we were hooked immediately. A landscape designer by day, David has a great Tumblr that we’ve been fans of for some time. To kick off 2014, he was kind enough to share some of his art and talk with us about how New England’s culture, landscape and ecology are reflected in his work.
AG: David, you’re originally from New England. We know it’s hard to describe where you’re from in just a few words, but what are one or two things the rest of the country (and/or New Englanders themselves) should know about the region? 
DBB: The New England forest was once clear-cut on an Amazonian magnitude. At the height of the region’s merino wool craze in the 1840s, approximately 70% of the New England landscape was cleared for pasture and agriculture. This sheep craze is just one example of the culture-driven landscape transformations the region has undergone in the course of its history. New England was arguably saved from the ecological disaster of sheep farming by another major cultural event: the Civil War and the subsequent opening of the West. All landscapes are created and experienced within a cultural context, and this is important to keep in mind when getting to know New England, or any other region for that matter.
AG: What draws you to explore the cultural landscapes of New England through the lens of art? How does where you’re from influence what you do? 
DBB: In my view, the human condition is a place-based experience and I’m exploring my place, New England, by way of art and design. Many of the ideas underlying my artwork are the same ideas I’m exploring in my landscape architecture practice. Part of my daily work is to analyze and communicate ideas related to landscape and this practice is often done through drawings. Still, the landscape architecture profession takes itself very seriously and operates on a long timeframe. My art is a creative counter to this; the artwork is created relatively quickly and is “light” in attitude, although no less informed. Because there are no clients to serve, my art allows me to explore my personal landscape-related interests including the nuances of being a native New Englander and the influence of place on the human experience.
AG: In several of your pieces, you combine cartography with the vernacular of New England. What is it about that intersection that interests you? Is there any sort of regional tradition along the same lines?  
DBB: There is a regional tradition of cartography, especially in the terms of New England’s colonial past. Many of the earliest documentations of New England were maps; maps of exploration, territory, resources, rivers, trade routes, etc. Beyond its history, I love cartography because it’s accessible. People know the language of maps. As a creative device, the map is an ancient, yet highly effective, communication tool that still resonates with folks, much like the vernacular of New England. Both cartography and the vernacular are relevant and meaningful to a broad cross section of people, which is of great interest to me as both an artist and a designer of the built environment.
AG: Your artwork draws from not only the cultural aspects of New England, but also its ecology, geology, etc.—elements that you work with as a landscape designer. How have you (re-)discovered the landscape around you through your illustration?
DBB: In terms of landscape, if geology is the bones, then ecology is the hair, skin and nails. And culture is the heart and soul. I work at the junction of man and nature. Much of my New England artwork can be boiled down to insights, commentary, or interesting facts about this intersection of landscape and culture. Some of my illustrations are project proposals, some are nerdy inside jokes, but all are exercises in learning about a landscape’s existing and/or proposed condition. In essence, my art is a means to understanding a place.
AG: With the Maine plaid and the preferred disruptive pattern material (DPMs), you delineate states using fabric tropes. We’re intrigued by the idea of regional fabrics. Talk to us about what plaid and camouflage represent to New Englanders and how they’re worn and used.
DBB: The term “urban fabric” is sometimes used in the urban planning and design field to describe the density, character and built condition of cities and suburbs. For example, a city with narrow streets and lots of densely built small buildings is said to have a tight fabric. Along these lines of thinking, I explore the fabrics of regional landscapes. So, what type of fabric would best describe the Maine woods in winter? A red and black Buffalo plaid seemed right to me.
Camouflage, also known as disruptive pattern material (DPM), is certainly a popular clothing pattern in New England. It is used on everything from snowmobiles to bikinis. Each prevalent camouflage pattern has a unique origin and its own set of cultural associations, including stereotypes. In the case of state identity, you can bet your wool mittens, New England is divided on the issue of camouflage preference… On the regional scale, each state possesses unique landscapes: the finger lakes in New Hampshire, the blue hills of Massachusetts, the swamps of Rhode Island, the valleys of Vermont, etcetera. Each landscape has its own distinct landscape ecology patterns and from 2000 feet above they reveal their own unique patterns, which often look like military issued camouflage patterns.
AG: One of the things we’re trying to explore in the American Guide is the persistence of regionalism. How do you see that playing out in New England?
DBB: The maple syrup bucket is half full. The type of regionalism that runs hand-in-hand with “place as tourist attraction” is alive and well in the town commons of New England. The type of regionalism that centers on a unique regional place-based way of life defiantly limps along. Market forces and transportation and communication technologies certainly challenge the regional character of New England, but there are forces greater than iPhones, cheap drywall and two-day shipping. In particular, people’s longing to be rooted in a place and their willingness to carry on family/local traditions are at the core of the persistence of regionalism.
AG: Are there any artists or designers you admire who similarly explored (or currently explore) New England regionalism?
DBB: New England has a rich art history and currently has a variety of thriving regional creative hubs: Portland (ME), Brattleboro (VT),   Peterborough (NH), Providence (RI), New Haven (CT) and my current hometown of Cambridge (MA). Some of the most influential “regional” artists to my creative work include Eric Sloane, Andrew Wyeth, Jon Piasecki, and my graduate school drawing instructor Anne McGee, who paints wonderfully insightful Fenway Park and Cape & Island scapes.
Although not artists per se, there are a number of influential New England-based writers who explore regionalism related topics in their work. These writers are the greatest influence on my fundamental understanding of the place-based experience and the complexity of cultural landscapes. My list is long, but three of the most powerful authors include Howard Mansfield (NH), John Stillgoe (MA), and Richard Forman (MA). And if I had to recommend just one book, it would be Stillgoe’s Outside Lies Magic: Regaining History and Awareness in Everyday Places. 
AG: Besides your Tumblr, where else can we find your work?
DBB: I’d like to welcome everyone to attend the group art show at the Aviary Gallery on January 2nd in Jamaica Plain, MA. The show, entitled BEST IN SHOW: An exhibition of art inspired by animals, both real & imagined runs through the end of the month. I have two animals in the show.
Beyond the animals exhibition, I’m currently developing an art installation at Bodega in Boston for March and am working with Trifecta Editions on a three-day art happening in May.
In the interim I’m participating in the Boston Fun-A-Day project by developing 31 one-page landscape installation proposals during the Month of January. The ultimate goal is to build a couple of these proposals in the field this summer. I encourage people to follow the daily progress of this project on my tumblr and instagram or my ol’ fashioned website.
Editor’s note: We’d definitely recommend checking out the Aviary Gallery show if you’re in the area. The Gallery is at 48 South Street in Jamaica Plain, MA and the opening reception is tomorrow, January 2nd from 6-9pm. Pets are welcome and a portion of the show’s proceeds will be donated to the Animal Rescue League of Boston. 
Illustrations in order of appearance - top to bottom, left to right:
1) Massachusetts’ Premiere Ecological Engineer - The Massachuset and Wampanoag tribes called the land I grew up in “Nanamooskeagin,” or “land of many beavers.” Sadly, the only castor canadensis I’ve seen in my hometown are found on the Abington town seal at the top of property tax bills. (Silkscreen print on 8 X 10” Rives BFK grey paper)
2) New England Demonym Map - Some times people name places. Other times places name people. (Mixed media: pencil, pen, watercolor, carbon transfer, photoshop touch. 8.5” X 11”, 2012)
3) Nurse Log- A familiar sight in the New England forest, the nurse log is essentially a fallen tree, covered with a layer of moss and organic debris. It provides a natural germination field for native species of shade loving plants. (Ink, graphite, colored pencil and carbon transfer on paper, 8.5 x 11”, Winter 2013) 
4) Maine Is Cold Map (Collage, Winter 2013)
5) Masshole, Circa 1620 A.D.  - The definition of a “masshole” is arguably as varied as the people of  Massachusetts. My personal perspective  is more concerned with local soil horizons than issues of poor driving manners or sour temperaments. (Two-color silkscreen print of this Masshole drawing available from Trifecta Editions)
6) Granite Love Letter - Installation Proposal:Life-sized fieldstone love note in the wild flower field on the southern hillside at Bobolink Farm in Harrisville, NH. Installation consists of 22 tons of dry-laid local granite field stone consisting of four stone fence inspired forms, laid out as “X O X O.”
7) Momma Said Knock You Out - The chestnut blight is a cruel organism; just as it appears the chestnut sapling has made its triumphant return and is going to shoot up to be a mighty tree of yore. It doesn’t. In the words of LL Cool J, “Don’t call it a comeback/I’ve been here for years”… a sad arrested state for a tree that once made up the majority of America’s total tree cover. (Pen, pencil, carbon transfer on paper, 8” X 10”, Spring 2011)
8) New England DPM Preference Map (Mixed media: Pen, pencil, acrylic paint, illustrator. Spring 2013)
* * *
David Buckley Borden is an artist, landscape designer (highly unlicensed landscape architect), and humorist hailing from the great state of New England. David’s art includes a variety of creative work ranging from landscape installations to silkscreen prints covering an even greater variety of interests in landscape architecture, all things “great outdoors,” and the past, present and future challenges to the lands of North America. Outside of work, when not leading his one-man campaign for sustainable cutis anserine americana, David can be found quietly playing in the dirt in and around his Cambridge, Massachusetts home.
Find more of his work at davidbuckleyborden.com, on Tumblr at davidbuckleyborden.tumblr.com and follow him on instagram. 
Zoom Info
ILLUSTRATED NEW ENGLAND
Not sure which of David Buckley Borden’s fantastic illustrations we first ran across, but whether it was the Masshole, the Demonym Map or one of his New England Ecological Engineers, we were hooked immediately. A landscape designer by day, David has a great Tumblr that we’ve been fans of for some time. To kick off 2014, he was kind enough to share some of his art and talk with us about how New England’s culture, landscape and ecology are reflected in his work.
AG: David, you’re originally from New England. We know it’s hard to describe where you’re from in just a few words, but what are one or two things the rest of the country (and/or New Englanders themselves) should know about the region? 
DBB: The New England forest was once clear-cut on an Amazonian magnitude. At the height of the region’s merino wool craze in the 1840s, approximately 70% of the New England landscape was cleared for pasture and agriculture. This sheep craze is just one example of the culture-driven landscape transformations the region has undergone in the course of its history. New England was arguably saved from the ecological disaster of sheep farming by another major cultural event: the Civil War and the subsequent opening of the West. All landscapes are created and experienced within a cultural context, and this is important to keep in mind when getting to know New England, or any other region for that matter.
AG: What draws you to explore the cultural landscapes of New England through the lens of art? How does where you’re from influence what you do? 
DBB: In my view, the human condition is a place-based experience and I’m exploring my place, New England, by way of art and design. Many of the ideas underlying my artwork are the same ideas I’m exploring in my landscape architecture practice. Part of my daily work is to analyze and communicate ideas related to landscape and this practice is often done through drawings. Still, the landscape architecture profession takes itself very seriously and operates on a long timeframe. My art is a creative counter to this; the artwork is created relatively quickly and is “light” in attitude, although no less informed. Because there are no clients to serve, my art allows me to explore my personal landscape-related interests including the nuances of being a native New Englander and the influence of place on the human experience.
AG: In several of your pieces, you combine cartography with the vernacular of New England. What is it about that intersection that interests you? Is there any sort of regional tradition along the same lines?  
DBB: There is a regional tradition of cartography, especially in the terms of New England’s colonial past. Many of the earliest documentations of New England were maps; maps of exploration, territory, resources, rivers, trade routes, etc. Beyond its history, I love cartography because it’s accessible. People know the language of maps. As a creative device, the map is an ancient, yet highly effective, communication tool that still resonates with folks, much like the vernacular of New England. Both cartography and the vernacular are relevant and meaningful to a broad cross section of people, which is of great interest to me as both an artist and a designer of the built environment.
AG: Your artwork draws from not only the cultural aspects of New England, but also its ecology, geology, etc.—elements that you work with as a landscape designer. How have you (re-)discovered the landscape around you through your illustration?
DBB: In terms of landscape, if geology is the bones, then ecology is the hair, skin and nails. And culture is the heart and soul. I work at the junction of man and nature. Much of my New England artwork can be boiled down to insights, commentary, or interesting facts about this intersection of landscape and culture. Some of my illustrations are project proposals, some are nerdy inside jokes, but all are exercises in learning about a landscape’s existing and/or proposed condition. In essence, my art is a means to understanding a place.
AG: With the Maine plaid and the preferred disruptive pattern material (DPMs), you delineate states using fabric tropes. We’re intrigued by the idea of regional fabrics. Talk to us about what plaid and camouflage represent to New Englanders and how they’re worn and used.
DBB: The term “urban fabric” is sometimes used in the urban planning and design field to describe the density, character and built condition of cities and suburbs. For example, a city with narrow streets and lots of densely built small buildings is said to have a tight fabric. Along these lines of thinking, I explore the fabrics of regional landscapes. So, what type of fabric would best describe the Maine woods in winter? A red and black Buffalo plaid seemed right to me.
Camouflage, also known as disruptive pattern material (DPM), is certainly a popular clothing pattern in New England. It is used on everything from snowmobiles to bikinis. Each prevalent camouflage pattern has a unique origin and its own set of cultural associations, including stereotypes. In the case of state identity, you can bet your wool mittens, New England is divided on the issue of camouflage preference… On the regional scale, each state possesses unique landscapes: the finger lakes in New Hampshire, the blue hills of Massachusetts, the swamps of Rhode Island, the valleys of Vermont, etcetera. Each landscape has its own distinct landscape ecology patterns and from 2000 feet above they reveal their own unique patterns, which often look like military issued camouflage patterns.
AG: One of the things we’re trying to explore in the American Guide is the persistence of regionalism. How do you see that playing out in New England?
DBB: The maple syrup bucket is half full. The type of regionalism that runs hand-in-hand with “place as tourist attraction” is alive and well in the town commons of New England. The type of regionalism that centers on a unique regional place-based way of life defiantly limps along. Market forces and transportation and communication technologies certainly challenge the regional character of New England, but there are forces greater than iPhones, cheap drywall and two-day shipping. In particular, people’s longing to be rooted in a place and their willingness to carry on family/local traditions are at the core of the persistence of regionalism.
AG: Are there any artists or designers you admire who similarly explored (or currently explore) New England regionalism?
DBB: New England has a rich art history and currently has a variety of thriving regional creative hubs: Portland (ME), Brattleboro (VT),   Peterborough (NH), Providence (RI), New Haven (CT) and my current hometown of Cambridge (MA). Some of the most influential “regional” artists to my creative work include Eric Sloane, Andrew Wyeth, Jon Piasecki, and my graduate school drawing instructor Anne McGee, who paints wonderfully insightful Fenway Park and Cape & Island scapes.
Although not artists per se, there are a number of influential New England-based writers who explore regionalism related topics in their work. These writers are the greatest influence on my fundamental understanding of the place-based experience and the complexity of cultural landscapes. My list is long, but three of the most powerful authors include Howard Mansfield (NH), John Stillgoe (MA), and Richard Forman (MA). And if I had to recommend just one book, it would be Stillgoe’s Outside Lies Magic: Regaining History and Awareness in Everyday Places. 
AG: Besides your Tumblr, where else can we find your work?
DBB: I’d like to welcome everyone to attend the group art show at the Aviary Gallery on January 2nd in Jamaica Plain, MA. The show, entitled BEST IN SHOW: An exhibition of art inspired by animals, both real & imagined runs through the end of the month. I have two animals in the show.
Beyond the animals exhibition, I’m currently developing an art installation at Bodega in Boston for March and am working with Trifecta Editions on a three-day art happening in May.
In the interim I’m participating in the Boston Fun-A-Day project by developing 31 one-page landscape installation proposals during the Month of January. The ultimate goal is to build a couple of these proposals in the field this summer. I encourage people to follow the daily progress of this project on my tumblr and instagram or my ol’ fashioned website.
Editor’s note: We’d definitely recommend checking out the Aviary Gallery show if you’re in the area. The Gallery is at 48 South Street in Jamaica Plain, MA and the opening reception is tomorrow, January 2nd from 6-9pm. Pets are welcome and a portion of the show’s proceeds will be donated to the Animal Rescue League of Boston. 
Illustrations in order of appearance - top to bottom, left to right:
1) Massachusetts’ Premiere Ecological Engineer - The Massachuset and Wampanoag tribes called the land I grew up in “Nanamooskeagin,” or “land of many beavers.” Sadly, the only castor canadensis I’ve seen in my hometown are found on the Abington town seal at the top of property tax bills. (Silkscreen print on 8 X 10” Rives BFK grey paper)
2) New England Demonym Map - Some times people name places. Other times places name people. (Mixed media: pencil, pen, watercolor, carbon transfer, photoshop touch. 8.5” X 11”, 2012)
3) Nurse Log- A familiar sight in the New England forest, the nurse log is essentially a fallen tree, covered with a layer of moss and organic debris. It provides a natural germination field for native species of shade loving plants. (Ink, graphite, colored pencil and carbon transfer on paper, 8.5 x 11”, Winter 2013) 
4) Maine Is Cold Map (Collage, Winter 2013)
5) Masshole, Circa 1620 A.D.  - The definition of a “masshole” is arguably as varied as the people of  Massachusetts. My personal perspective  is more concerned with local soil horizons than issues of poor driving manners or sour temperaments. (Two-color silkscreen print of this Masshole drawing available from Trifecta Editions)
6) Granite Love Letter - Installation Proposal:Life-sized fieldstone love note in the wild flower field on the southern hillside at Bobolink Farm in Harrisville, NH. Installation consists of 22 tons of dry-laid local granite field stone consisting of four stone fence inspired forms, laid out as “X O X O.”
7) Momma Said Knock You Out - The chestnut blight is a cruel organism; just as it appears the chestnut sapling has made its triumphant return and is going to shoot up to be a mighty tree of yore. It doesn’t. In the words of LL Cool J, “Don’t call it a comeback/I’ve been here for years”… a sad arrested state for a tree that once made up the majority of America’s total tree cover. (Pen, pencil, carbon transfer on paper, 8” X 10”, Spring 2011)
8) New England DPM Preference Map (Mixed media: Pen, pencil, acrylic paint, illustrator. Spring 2013)
* * *
David Buckley Borden is an artist, landscape designer (highly unlicensed landscape architect), and humorist hailing from the great state of New England. David’s art includes a variety of creative work ranging from landscape installations to silkscreen prints covering an even greater variety of interests in landscape architecture, all things “great outdoors,” and the past, present and future challenges to the lands of North America. Outside of work, when not leading his one-man campaign for sustainable cutis anserine americana, David can be found quietly playing in the dirt in and around his Cambridge, Massachusetts home.
Find more of his work at davidbuckleyborden.com, on Tumblr at davidbuckleyborden.tumblr.com and follow him on instagram. 
Zoom Info

ILLUSTRATED NEW ENGLAND

Not sure which of David Buckley Borden’s fantastic illustrations we first ran across, but whether it was the Masshole, the Demonym Map or one of his New England Ecological Engineers, we were hooked immediately. A landscape designer by day, David has a great Tumblr that we’ve been fans of for some time. To kick off 2014, he was kind enough to share some of his art and talk with us about how New England’s culture, landscape and ecology are reflected in his work.

AG: David, you’re originally from New England. We know it’s hard to describe where you’re from in just a few words, but what are one or two things the rest of the country (and/or New Englanders themselves) should know about the region? 

DBB: The New England forest was once clear-cut on an Amazonian magnitude. At the height of the region’s merino wool craze in the 1840s, approximately 70% of the New England landscape was cleared for pasture and agriculture. This sheep craze is just one example of the culture-driven landscape transformations the region has undergone in the course of its history. New England was arguably saved from the ecological disaster of sheep farming by another major cultural event: the Civil War and the subsequent opening of the West. All landscapes are created and experienced within a cultural context, and this is important to keep in mind when getting to know New England, or any other region for that matter.

AG: What draws you to explore the cultural landscapes of New England through the lens of art? How does where you’re from influence what you do? 

DBB: In my view, the human condition is a place-based experience and I’m exploring my place, New England, by way of art and design. Many of the ideas underlying my artwork are the same ideas I’m exploring in my landscape architecture practice. Part of my daily work is to analyze and communicate ideas related to landscape and this practice is often done through drawings. Still, the landscape architecture profession takes itself very seriously and operates on a long timeframe. My art is a creative counter to this; the artwork is created relatively quickly and is “light” in attitude, although no less informed. Because there are no clients to serve, my art allows me to explore my personal landscape-related interests including the nuances of being a native New Englander and the influence of place on the human experience.

AG: In several of your pieces, you combine cartography with the vernacular of New England. What is it about that intersection that interests you? Is there any sort of regional tradition along the same lines?  

DBB: There is a regional tradition of cartography, especially in the terms of New England’s colonial past. Many of the earliest documentations of New England were maps; maps of exploration, territory, resources, rivers, trade routes, etc. Beyond its history, I love cartography because it’s accessible. People know the language of maps. As a creative device, the map is an ancient, yet highly effective, communication tool that still resonates with folks, much like the vernacular of New England. Both cartography and the vernacular are relevant and meaningful to a broad cross section of people, which is of great interest to me as both an artist and a designer of the built environment.

AG: Your artwork draws from not only the cultural aspects of New England, but also its ecology, geology, etc.—elements that you work with as a landscape designer. How have you (re-)discovered the landscape around you through your illustration?

DBB: In terms of landscape, if geology is the bones, then ecology is the hair, skin and nails. And culture is the heart and soul. I work at the junction of man and nature. Much of my New England artwork can be boiled down to insights, commentary, or interesting facts about this intersection of landscape and culture. Some of my illustrations are project proposals, some are nerdy inside jokes, but all are exercises in learning about a landscape’s existing and/or proposed condition. In essence, my art is a means to understanding a place.

AG: With the Maine plaid and the preferred disruptive pattern material (DPMs), you delineate states using fabric tropes. We’re intrigued by the idea of regional fabrics. Talk to us about what plaid and camouflage represent to New Englanders and how they’re worn and used.

DBB: The term “urban fabric” is sometimes used in the urban planning and design field to describe the density, character and built condition of cities and suburbs. For example, a city with narrow streets and lots of densely built small buildings is said to have a tight fabric. Along these lines of thinking, I explore the fabrics of regional landscapes. So, what type of fabric would best describe the Maine woods in winter? A red and black Buffalo plaid seemed right to me.

Camouflage, also known as disruptive pattern material (DPM), is certainly a popular clothing pattern in New England. It is used on everything from snowmobiles to bikinis. Each prevalent camouflage pattern has a unique origin and its own set of cultural associations, including stereotypes. In the case of state identity, you can bet your wool mittens, New England is divided on the issue of camouflage preference… On the regional scale, each state possesses unique landscapes: the finger lakes in New Hampshire, the blue hills of Massachusetts, the swamps of Rhode Island, the valleys of Vermont, etcetera. Each landscape has its own distinct landscape ecology patterns and from 2000 feet above they reveal their own unique patterns, which often look like military issued camouflage patterns.

AG: One of the things we’re trying to explore in the American Guide is the persistence of regionalism. How do you see that playing out in New England?

DBB: The maple syrup bucket is half full. The type of regionalism that runs hand-in-hand with “place as tourist attraction” is alive and well in the town commons of New England. The type of regionalism that centers on a unique regional place-based way of life defiantly limps along. Market forces and transportation and communication technologies certainly challenge the regional character of New England, but there are forces greater than iPhones, cheap drywall and two-day shipping. In particular, people’s longing to be rooted in a place and their willingness to carry on family/local traditions are at the core of the persistence of regionalism.

AG: Are there any artists or designers you admire who similarly explored (or currently explore) New England regionalism?

DBB: New England has a rich art history and currently has a variety of thriving regional creative hubs: Portland (ME), Brattleboro (VT),   Peterborough (NH), Providence (RI), New Haven (CT) and my current hometown of Cambridge (MA). Some of the most influential “regional” artists to my creative work include Eric Sloane, Andrew Wyeth, Jon Piasecki, and my graduate school drawing instructor Anne McGee, who paints wonderfully insightful Fenway Park and Cape & Island scapes.

Although not artists per se, there are a number of influential New England-based writers who explore regionalism related topics in their work. These writers are the greatest influence on my fundamental understanding of the place-based experience and the complexity of cultural landscapes. My list is long, but three of the most powerful authors include Howard Mansfield (NH), John Stillgoe (MA), and Richard Forman (MA). And if I had to recommend just one book, it would be Stillgoe’s Outside Lies Magic: Regaining History and Awareness in Everyday Places. 

AG: Besides your Tumblr, where else can we find your work?

DBB: I’d like to welcome everyone to attend the group art show at the Aviary Gallery on January 2nd in Jamaica Plain, MA. The show, entitled BEST IN SHOW: An exhibition of art inspired by animals, both real & imagined runs through the end of the month. I have two animals in the show.

Beyond the animals exhibition, I’m currently developing an art installation at Bodega in Boston for March and am working with Trifecta Editions on a three-day art happening in May.

In the interim I’m participating in the Boston Fun-A-Day project by developing 31 one-page landscape installation proposals during the Month of January. The ultimate goal is to build a couple of these proposals in the field this summer. I encourage people to follow the daily progress of this project on my tumblr and instagram or my ol’ fashioned website.

Editor’s note: We’d definitely recommend checking out the Aviary Gallery show if you’re in the area. The Gallery is at 48 South Street in Jamaica Plain, MA and the opening reception is tomorrow, January 2nd from 6-9pm. Pets are welcome and a portion of the show’s proceeds will be donated to the Animal Rescue League of Boston. 

Illustrations in order of appearance - top to bottom, left to right:

1) Massachusetts’ Premiere Ecological Engineer The Massachuset and Wampanoag tribes called the land I grew up in “Nanamooskeagin,” or “land of many beavers.” Sadly, the only castor canadensis I’ve seen in my hometown are found on the Abington town seal at the top of property tax bills. (Silkscreen print on 8 X 10” Rives BFK grey paper)

2) New England Demonym MapSome times people name places. Other times places name people. (Mixed media: pencil, pen, watercolor, carbon transfer, photoshop touch. 8.5” X 11”, 2012)

3) Nurse Log- A familiar sight in the New England forest, the nurse log is essentially a fallen tree, covered with a layer of moss and organic debris. It provides a natural germination field for native species of shade loving plants. (Ink, graphite, colored pencil and carbon transfer on paper, 8.5 x 11”, Winter 2013) 

4) Maine Is Cold Map (Collage, Winter 2013)

5) Masshole, Circa 1620 A.D.  The definition of a “masshole” is arguably as varied as the people of  Massachusetts. My personal perspective  is more concerned with local soil horizons than issues of poor driving manners or sour temperaments. (Two-color silkscreen print of this Masshole drawing available from Trifecta Editions)

6) Granite Love Letter - Installation Proposal:Life-sized fieldstone love note in the wild flower field on the southern hillside at Bobolink Farm in Harrisville, NH. Installation consists of 22 tons of dry-laid local granite field stone consisting of four stone fence inspired forms, laid out as “X O X O.”

7) Momma Said Knock You OutThe chestnut blight is a cruel organism; just as it appears the chestnut sapling has made its triumphant return and is going to shoot up to be a mighty tree of yore. It doesn’t. In the words of LL Cool J, “Don’t call it a comeback/I’ve been here for years”… a sad arrested state for a tree that once made up the majority of America’s total tree cover. (Pen, pencil, carbon transfer on paper, 8” X 10”, Spring 2011)

8) New England DPM Preference Map (Mixed media: Pen, pencil, acrylic paint, illustrator. Spring 2013)

* * *

David Buckley Borden is an artist, landscape designer (highly unlicensed landscape architect), and humorist hailing from the great state of New England. David’s art includes a variety of creative work ranging from landscape installations to silkscreen prints covering an even greater variety of interests in landscape architecture, all things “great outdoors,” and the past, present and future challenges to the lands of North America. Outside of work, when not leading his one-man campaign for sustainable cutis anserine americana, David can be found quietly playing in the dirt in and around his Cambridge, Massachusetts home.

Find more of his work at davidbuckleyborden.com, on Tumblr at davidbuckleyborden.tumblr.com and follow him on instagram

STONEWALL FIELD GUIDE SERIES, INCLUDING THE WHISKEY WALL - NEW ENGLAND 

New England artist David Buckley Borden sketches a guide to New England’s “stonewalls” for Field Assignment #6: Architecture

Ask a New Englander to describe their rural landscape and “stonewalls” would likely top the list, perhaps second only to trees. Glaciation produced a crop of stones and industrious New Englanders rearranged them into an estimated 250,000 miles of walls. Although it’s been over 200 years since the height of stonewall building peaked in the early 1800s, an estimated 100,000 miles of stonewalls still stand as an understated testament to a complex land use history.

Not all stonewalls are created equal. The region’s stonewalls are as varied as the people of New England in their build and intention. Stonewalls range from the hastily tossed farm wall to grand “finished” estate walls. Any landscape-loving Yankee worth his salt can “read” a wall to accurately determine a parcel’s land use history. The following field guide presents five typical stonewalls in section with a brief description of defining features and how the wall’s form provides clues to a landscape’s history.

Tossed Wall (Fig. 1)

The Tossed Wall is architectural evidence of agriculture. As fields were cleared for tilling, these stonewalls were literally tossed into existence —one stone at a time — at the edge of an agricultural field. The form of a tossed wall is loose and often far wider than tall. The builder’s goal was to dump the stone; stacking it up was unnecessary.

Disposal Wall (Fig. 5)

Similar to the Tossed Wall, the Disposal Wall is also a byproduct of agriculture. In some cases the Disposal Wall was initially a Tossed Wall that had been rebuilt in an effort to tidy up the farm. The Disposal Wall is built from two single stack walls, where the resultant void is filed with smaller fieldstones. This type of disposal wall is evidence of a successful agriculture.

Pasture Wall (Fig. 4)

The Pasture Wall, also known as a farm wall, was built to contain livestock and is the most common type of stonewall in New England. This wall is characterized by large stones and typically lacks the smaller stones of an agriculture related wall. The wood rails that once made up most of the wall’s height and ensured that livestock stayed put, have long since rotted.

Gentleman’s Farm Wall (Fig. 6)

The Gentleman’s Farm Wall or Estate Wall is neither the direct result of agriculture nor husbandry, but is a statement of values and achievement. This wall communicates pride, order and wealth by means of craftsmanship. The wall’s tight one-over-two construction, consistent batter and capstone, were of significant expense and beyond the reach of most thrifty New England farmers.

Whiskey Wall (Fig. 7)

The Whiskey Wall is arguably the most misunderstood and misclassified stonewall typology. There is serious debate as to the exact origin of the name. Some historians claim it is called a Whiskey Wall because it was built under the influence of whiskey. As one can easily imagine, “walling under the influence” lends to poor construction practice and eventually leads to the wall’s failure. Others claim it is called a Whiskey Wall because it was destroyed by drunk hunters, likely trying to flush out an animal from the wall. Both options seem plausible, but only the empty whiskey bottle truly knows.

* * *

David Buckley Borden is an artist, landscape designer (highly unlicensed landscape architect), and humorist hailing from the great state of New England. David’s art includes a variety of creative work ranging from landscape installations to silkscreen prints covering an even greater variety of interests in landscape architecture, all things “great outdoors,” and the past, present and future challenges to the lands of North America. Outside of work, when not leading his one-man campaign for sustainable cutis anserine americana, David can be found quietly playing in the dirt in and around his Cambridge, Massachusetts home.

Follow at davidbuckleyborden.com, on Tumblr and on instagram. More of the Stonewall Field Guide Series can be seen here: davidbuckleyborden.com/#/now-in-process.

FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
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FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info

FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE

AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.

The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.

Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.

Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °

Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.

Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com

THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
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THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

‘Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 
—Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)
NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.
* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info

THE FAR AWAY LAND - NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS

Thar she blows!' That was the cry that spelled wealth and fame for [Nantucket and New Bedford], when for a century and a half Buzzards Bay was the world center of a golden industry. The Bay itself is only half tamed. Dark islands rise up from its depths, the last strongholds of a primitive wilderness. 

Here’s New England, A Guide To Vacationland (WPA, 1939)

NANTUCKET (Island) is named from the Indian Nanticut, meaning ‘The Far Away Land.’

Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

Editor’s note: These are a selection of cell phone photos. Follow Michael Cevoli on Instagram.

* * *

Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.

APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.
—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.
* * *


Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.
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APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.
—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.
* * *


Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.
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APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.
—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.
* * *


Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.
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APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.
—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.
* * *


Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.
Zoom Info
APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.
—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.
* * *


Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.
Zoom Info
APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.
—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.
* * *


Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.
Zoom Info
APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.
—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.
* * *


Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.
Zoom Info
APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.
—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.
* * *


Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.
Zoom Info
APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.
—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.
* * *


Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.
Zoom Info

APPLE PICKING SEASON - VERMONT

Yes, I think it is nearly safe, by and large, in spite of many exceptions… to say that Vermont represents the past, is a piece of the past in the midst of the present and future.

—Dorothy Canfield Fisher in “Vermonters,” Vermont, A Guide To the Green Mountain State (WPA, 1937)

It’s apple picking and cider pressing party season here in Vermont.

* * *

Tara Wray is the State Guide to Vermont. A photographer and award-winning documentary filmmaker (but mainly a mom of three-year-old identical twin sons), she is drawn to photography as a means to combat the otherwise general and fleeting nature of life. Follow her on Tumblr at Tara Wray Photography and find her portfolio site at tarawray.net.

PRIVACY PLEASE - CUSHING, MAINE

This coastal town has a population of 1500, but it can feel more like 15, which I imagine is the draw for the people that live here. It’s a quiet setting far from the tourist and daily commuter traffic of Route One, where a few roads run across open fields, through dense pines and along the water of the St. George River where it meets the Atlantic Ocean. The asphalt roads ultimately turn to dirt and they all end at the shoreline.

It’s a private place and the private people live in homes set off from the road on top of a hill overlooking the bay, or down a long dirt path that disappears in the woods to a camp on the cove’s edge. They’re afforded sweeping views across the wide, salty river on a clear day, or just as easily it could be 20 yards of visibility into a wall of fog that sits for days straight and puts one more layer between neighbors.

They didn’t settle here for the nightlife. They meet each other at the one general store where they fill their cars with gas and collect diesel for their boats, or buy fresh halibut for dinner if they didn’t already catch some themselves. The young girl behind the counter tells you she’s going to the city for school this fall just in case you assumed she’d spend her life here, and when you ask which city she replies Springfield, Mass.

They congregate with their trucks down at the cove’s end where the coming tide can’t come anymore. And when it goes out they walk out with it and I imagine they make small talk while the mud sucks at their boots as they bend over with a clam rake, slowly working their way further out towards the sea, moving slowly away from each other until there’s no more talk but just the steady sound of metal moving through wet mud and stone.

* * *

Guide to the Northeast Brett Klein lives in Connecticut and works in New York, but prefers small town life and his home state of Maine. Any chance to get rural is a mental vacation. Follow Klein on Tumblr at The Coast is Clear. His curatorial collection of Americana, rural life, other artists and ephemera can be seen on Tumblr at Tons of Land.

THE SEARCH FOR FAMOUS GRAVES IN NEW ENGLAND (PART I)

The art of carving found a particularly touching expression in gravestones, which apparently deserved special attention in the solemn judgment of Colonials. Such memorials…bear indications of an authentic talent for carving in decorative borders, sacred symbols, and ruminative epitaphs. It was an original and appropriate manner of commemoration, with far more vitality in design and feeling for the craft than was revealed in native plastic art of later date. 
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

—Jack Kerouac (Lowell, MA), Lizzie  Borden (Fall River, MA), B.F Skinner (Cambridge, MA), Minor White (Cambridge, MA), Buckminster Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Cambridge, MA), Henry David Thoreau (Concord, MA), Ralph Waldo Emerson (Concord, MA), Louisa May Alcott (Concord, MA), H.P. Lovecraft (Providence, RI), Nathaniel Hawthorne (Concord, MA), Margaret Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Robert Creeley (Cambridge, MA), Winslow Homer (Cambridge, MA)—
For the month of May, Jon Creamer and I set out to find, pay our respect, and photograph several famous graves throughout New England. The list above contains the ones that we sought after and found, all (mostly) in Massachusetts.
Jack Kerouac was the first grave that I set out to find and is also what inspired me to go forward with this project.  Like many 18 year olds, I fell in love with Kerouac’s work when I first read On the Road. His words inspired me to travel, to leave my small town and see this great big country, to gas up and get out. Eight years later, I find myself still gassing-up and getting out…gathering inspiration from Jack along the way. This time from his death. When I discovered that Kerouac was buried only a mere two hours away from me in Lowell, Massachusetts, it became a must-plan weekend roadtrip.  This road trip happened and soon started the ‘Famous New England Graves Search’ of May 2013.
Jon and I traveled separately throughout New England searching for these iconic, historic, and poetic tombstones. While I spent most of my time at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA, Jon was not far away in Concord, MA exploring Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Within this 15 mile distance, we discovered some of history’s most influential, inspirational, and memorable people.
To be continued…. 
* * *
Brittany Marcoux is a Guide to Rhode Island and an At-Large Guide to New England for The American Guide. She’s a photographer and a native New Englander. Follow her work on Tumblr or via her website.
Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.
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THE SEARCH FOR FAMOUS GRAVES IN NEW ENGLAND (PART I)

The art of carving found a particularly touching expression in gravestones, which apparently deserved special attention in the solemn judgment of Colonials. Such memorials…bear indications of an authentic talent for carving in decorative borders, sacred symbols, and ruminative epitaphs. It was an original and appropriate manner of commemoration, with far more vitality in design and feeling for the craft than was revealed in native plastic art of later date. 
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

—Jack Kerouac (Lowell, MA), Lizzie  Borden (Fall River, MA), B.F Skinner (Cambridge, MA), Minor White (Cambridge, MA), Buckminster Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Cambridge, MA), Henry David Thoreau (Concord, MA), Ralph Waldo Emerson (Concord, MA), Louisa May Alcott (Concord, MA), H.P. Lovecraft (Providence, RI), Nathaniel Hawthorne (Concord, MA), Margaret Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Robert Creeley (Cambridge, MA), Winslow Homer (Cambridge, MA)—
For the month of May, Jon Creamer and I set out to find, pay our respect, and photograph several famous graves throughout New England. The list above contains the ones that we sought after and found, all (mostly) in Massachusetts.
Jack Kerouac was the first grave that I set out to find and is also what inspired me to go forward with this project.  Like many 18 year olds, I fell in love with Kerouac’s work when I first read On the Road. His words inspired me to travel, to leave my small town and see this great big country, to gas up and get out. Eight years later, I find myself still gassing-up and getting out…gathering inspiration from Jack along the way. This time from his death. When I discovered that Kerouac was buried only a mere two hours away from me in Lowell, Massachusetts, it became a must-plan weekend roadtrip.  This road trip happened and soon started the ‘Famous New England Graves Search’ of May 2013.
Jon and I traveled separately throughout New England searching for these iconic, historic, and poetic tombstones. While I spent most of my time at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA, Jon was not far away in Concord, MA exploring Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Within this 15 mile distance, we discovered some of history’s most influential, inspirational, and memorable people.
To be continued…. 
* * *
Brittany Marcoux is a Guide to Rhode Island and an At-Large Guide to New England for The American Guide. She’s a photographer and a native New Englander. Follow her work on Tumblr or via her website.
Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE SEARCH FOR FAMOUS GRAVES IN NEW ENGLAND (PART I)

The art of carving found a particularly touching expression in gravestones, which apparently deserved special attention in the solemn judgment of Colonials. Such memorials…bear indications of an authentic talent for carving in decorative borders, sacred symbols, and ruminative epitaphs. It was an original and appropriate manner of commemoration, with far more vitality in design and feeling for the craft than was revealed in native plastic art of later date. 
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

—Jack Kerouac (Lowell, MA), Lizzie  Borden (Fall River, MA), B.F Skinner (Cambridge, MA), Minor White (Cambridge, MA), Buckminster Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Cambridge, MA), Henry David Thoreau (Concord, MA), Ralph Waldo Emerson (Concord, MA), Louisa May Alcott (Concord, MA), H.P. Lovecraft (Providence, RI), Nathaniel Hawthorne (Concord, MA), Margaret Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Robert Creeley (Cambridge, MA), Winslow Homer (Cambridge, MA)—
For the month of May, Jon Creamer and I set out to find, pay our respect, and photograph several famous graves throughout New England. The list above contains the ones that we sought after and found, all (mostly) in Massachusetts.
Jack Kerouac was the first grave that I set out to find and is also what inspired me to go forward with this project.  Like many 18 year olds, I fell in love with Kerouac’s work when I first read On the Road. His words inspired me to travel, to leave my small town and see this great big country, to gas up and get out. Eight years later, I find myself still gassing-up and getting out…gathering inspiration from Jack along the way. This time from his death. When I discovered that Kerouac was buried only a mere two hours away from me in Lowell, Massachusetts, it became a must-plan weekend roadtrip.  This road trip happened and soon started the ‘Famous New England Graves Search’ of May 2013.
Jon and I traveled separately throughout New England searching for these iconic, historic, and poetic tombstones. While I spent most of my time at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA, Jon was not far away in Concord, MA exploring Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Within this 15 mile distance, we discovered some of history’s most influential, inspirational, and memorable people.
To be continued…. 
* * *
Brittany Marcoux is a Guide to Rhode Island and an At-Large Guide to New England for The American Guide. She’s a photographer and a native New Englander. Follow her work on Tumblr or via her website.
Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE SEARCH FOR FAMOUS GRAVES IN NEW ENGLAND (PART I)

The art of carving found a particularly touching expression in gravestones, which apparently deserved special attention in the solemn judgment of Colonials. Such memorials…bear indications of an authentic talent for carving in decorative borders, sacred symbols, and ruminative epitaphs. It was an original and appropriate manner of commemoration, with far more vitality in design and feeling for the craft than was revealed in native plastic art of later date. 
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

—Jack Kerouac (Lowell, MA), Lizzie  Borden (Fall River, MA), B.F Skinner (Cambridge, MA), Minor White (Cambridge, MA), Buckminster Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Cambridge, MA), Henry David Thoreau (Concord, MA), Ralph Waldo Emerson (Concord, MA), Louisa May Alcott (Concord, MA), H.P. Lovecraft (Providence, RI), Nathaniel Hawthorne (Concord, MA), Margaret Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Robert Creeley (Cambridge, MA), Winslow Homer (Cambridge, MA)—
For the month of May, Jon Creamer and I set out to find, pay our respect, and photograph several famous graves throughout New England. The list above contains the ones that we sought after and found, all (mostly) in Massachusetts.
Jack Kerouac was the first grave that I set out to find and is also what inspired me to go forward with this project.  Like many 18 year olds, I fell in love with Kerouac’s work when I first read On the Road. His words inspired me to travel, to leave my small town and see this great big country, to gas up and get out. Eight years later, I find myself still gassing-up and getting out…gathering inspiration from Jack along the way. This time from his death. When I discovered that Kerouac was buried only a mere two hours away from me in Lowell, Massachusetts, it became a must-plan weekend roadtrip.  This road trip happened and soon started the ‘Famous New England Graves Search’ of May 2013.
Jon and I traveled separately throughout New England searching for these iconic, historic, and poetic tombstones. While I spent most of my time at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA, Jon was not far away in Concord, MA exploring Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Within this 15 mile distance, we discovered some of history’s most influential, inspirational, and memorable people.
To be continued…. 
* * *
Brittany Marcoux is a Guide to Rhode Island and an At-Large Guide to New England for The American Guide. She’s a photographer and a native New Englander. Follow her work on Tumblr or via her website.
Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE SEARCH FOR FAMOUS GRAVES IN NEW ENGLAND (PART I)

The art of carving found a particularly touching expression in gravestones, which apparently deserved special attention in the solemn judgment of Colonials. Such memorials…bear indications of an authentic talent for carving in decorative borders, sacred symbols, and ruminative epitaphs. It was an original and appropriate manner of commemoration, with far more vitality in design and feeling for the craft than was revealed in native plastic art of later date. 
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

—Jack Kerouac (Lowell, MA), Lizzie  Borden (Fall River, MA), B.F Skinner (Cambridge, MA), Minor White (Cambridge, MA), Buckminster Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Cambridge, MA), Henry David Thoreau (Concord, MA), Ralph Waldo Emerson (Concord, MA), Louisa May Alcott (Concord, MA), H.P. Lovecraft (Providence, RI), Nathaniel Hawthorne (Concord, MA), Margaret Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Robert Creeley (Cambridge, MA), Winslow Homer (Cambridge, MA)—
For the month of May, Jon Creamer and I set out to find, pay our respect, and photograph several famous graves throughout New England. The list above contains the ones that we sought after and found, all (mostly) in Massachusetts.
Jack Kerouac was the first grave that I set out to find and is also what inspired me to go forward with this project.  Like many 18 year olds, I fell in love with Kerouac’s work when I first read On the Road. His words inspired me to travel, to leave my small town and see this great big country, to gas up and get out. Eight years later, I find myself still gassing-up and getting out…gathering inspiration from Jack along the way. This time from his death. When I discovered that Kerouac was buried only a mere two hours away from me in Lowell, Massachusetts, it became a must-plan weekend roadtrip.  This road trip happened and soon started the ‘Famous New England Graves Search’ of May 2013.
Jon and I traveled separately throughout New England searching for these iconic, historic, and poetic tombstones. While I spent most of my time at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA, Jon was not far away in Concord, MA exploring Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Within this 15 mile distance, we discovered some of history’s most influential, inspirational, and memorable people.
To be continued…. 
* * *
Brittany Marcoux is a Guide to Rhode Island and an At-Large Guide to New England for The American Guide. She’s a photographer and a native New Englander. Follow her work on Tumblr or via her website.
Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE SEARCH FOR FAMOUS GRAVES IN NEW ENGLAND (PART I)

The art of carving found a particularly touching expression in gravestones, which apparently deserved special attention in the solemn judgment of Colonials. Such memorials…bear indications of an authentic talent for carving in decorative borders, sacred symbols, and ruminative epitaphs. It was an original and appropriate manner of commemoration, with far more vitality in design and feeling for the craft than was revealed in native plastic art of later date. 
—Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

—Jack Kerouac (Lowell, MA), Lizzie  Borden (Fall River, MA), B.F Skinner (Cambridge, MA), Minor White (Cambridge, MA), Buckminster Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Cambridge, MA), Henry David Thoreau (Concord, MA), Ralph Waldo Emerson (Concord, MA), Louisa May Alcott (Concord, MA), H.P. Lovecraft (Providence, RI), Nathaniel Hawthorne (Concord, MA), Margaret Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Robert Creeley (Cambridge, MA), Winslow Homer (Cambridge, MA)—
For the month of May, Jon Creamer and I set out to find, pay our respect, and photograph several famous graves throughout New England. The list above contains the ones that we sought after and found, all (mostly) in Massachusetts.
Jack Kerouac was the first grave that I set out to find and is also what inspired me to go forward with this project.  Like many 18 year olds, I fell in love with Kerouac’s work when I first read On the Road. His words inspired me to travel, to leave my small town and see this great big country, to gas up and get out. Eight years later, I find myself still gassing-up and getting out…gathering inspiration from Jack along the way. This time from his death. When I discovered that Kerouac was buried only a mere two hours away from me in Lowell, Massachusetts, it became a must-plan weekend roadtrip.  This road trip happened and soon started the ‘Famous New England Graves Search’ of May 2013.
Jon and I traveled separately throughout New England searching for these iconic, historic, and poetic tombstones. While I spent most of my time at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA, Jon was not far away in Concord, MA exploring Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Within this 15 mile distance, we discovered some of history’s most influential, inspirational, and memorable people.
To be continued…. 
* * *
Brittany Marcoux is a Guide to Rhode Island and an At-Large Guide to New England for The American Guide. She’s a photographer and a native New Englander. Follow her work on Tumblr or via her website.
Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

THE SEARCH FOR FAMOUS GRAVES IN NEW ENGLAND (PART I)

The art of carving found a particularly touching expression in gravestones, which apparently deserved special attention in the solemn judgment of Colonials. Such memorials…bear indications of an authentic talent for carving in decorative borders, sacred symbols, and ruminative epitaphs. It was an original and appropriate manner of commemoration, with far more vitality in design and feeling for the craft than was revealed in native plastic art of later date.

Massachusetts, A Guide To Its Places and People (WPA, 1937)

—Jack Kerouac (Lowell, MA), Lizzie  Borden (Fall River, MA), B.F Skinner (Cambridge, MA), Minor White (Cambridge, MA), Buckminster Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (Cambridge, MA), Henry David Thoreau (Concord, MA), Ralph Waldo Emerson (Concord, MA), Louisa May Alcott (Concord, MA), H.P. Lovecraft (Providence, RI), Nathaniel Hawthorne (Concord, MA), Margaret Fuller (Cambridge, MA), Robert Creeley (Cambridge, MA), Winslow Homer (Cambridge, MA)—

For the month of May, Jon Creamer and I set out to find, pay our respect, and photograph several famous graves throughout New England. The list above contains the ones that we sought after and found, all (mostly) in Massachusetts.

Jack Kerouac was the first grave that I set out to find and is also what inspired me to go forward with this project.  Like many 18 year olds, I fell in love with Kerouac’s work when I first read On the Road. His words inspired me to travel, to leave my small town and see this great big country, to gas up and get out. Eight years later, I find myself still gassing-up and getting out…gathering inspiration from Jack along the way. This time from his death. When I discovered that Kerouac was buried only a mere two hours away from me in Lowell, Massachusetts, it became a must-plan weekend roadtrip.  This road trip happened and soon started the ‘Famous New England Graves Search’ of May 2013.

Jon and I traveled separately throughout New England searching for these iconic, historic, and poetic tombstones. While I spent most of my time at the Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, MA, Jon was not far away in Concord, MA exploring Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Within this 15 mile distance, we discovered some of history’s most influential, inspirational, and memorable people.

To be continued…. 

* * *

Brittany Marcoux is a Guide to Rhode Island and an At-Large Guide to New England for The American Guide. She’s a photographer and a native New Englander. Follow her work on Tumblr or via her website.

Jon Creamer is a teacher and photographer, currently on sabbatical from the Groton School in Groton, MA, based in Providence, RI between his travels. More of his work can be seen at his website and on tumblr at years-of-indiscretion.tumblr.com.