SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
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SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
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SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

  1. Boot Bar lettering.
  2. Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
  3. Dodge lettering. 
  4. Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
  5. King of Jeans lettering.
  6. A Man’s Image lettering. 
  7. Melino’s lettering. 
  8. Texas Weiners lettering.
  9. Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
  10. DEERE lettering. 

* * *

Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.

CABELA’S - HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

The denuding of woodland tracts accounts in large part for the disappearance of elk and moose and the regrettable diminution of other forms of animal life in Pennsylvania. Early settlers found the wilderness teeming with game, the lakes and streams filled with fish, while the sun was often obscured for several minutes by dense flocks of migratory fowl.
—Pensylvannia, A Guide To the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

Guide note:The Cabela’s store in Hamburg, PA is the largest of the company’s 50 brick and mortar facilities, with 250,000 sq. ft. of taxidermy, firearms, ammunition, cafeteria and aquarium. Location: 100 Cabela Drive, Hamburg, PA, 19526. Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:00am-9:00pm; Sun. - 9:00am-8:00pm.
(Images numbered top to bottom, left to right: John Michael Kilbane - 1, 2, 7, 8; Erin Chapman - 3, 4, 5, 6.)
* * *
John Michael Kilbane is a midwesterner recently transplanted to New York to intern for Lapham’s Quarterly. Now he is a sometimes writer, researcher and photography enthusiast trying to make it work in the big city. You can see his photography and writing evolve, hopefully for the better, at johnkilbane.tumblr.com and on Flickr.
Erin Chapman is a co-editor of The American Guide.
Zoom Info
CABELA’S - HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

The denuding of woodland tracts accounts in large part for the disappearance of elk and moose and the regrettable diminution of other forms of animal life in Pennsylvania. Early settlers found the wilderness teeming with game, the lakes and streams filled with fish, while the sun was often obscured for several minutes by dense flocks of migratory fowl.
—Pensylvannia, A Guide To the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

Guide note:The Cabela’s store in Hamburg, PA is the largest of the company’s 50 brick and mortar facilities, with 250,000 sq. ft. of taxidermy, firearms, ammunition, cafeteria and aquarium. Location: 100 Cabela Drive, Hamburg, PA, 19526. Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:00am-9:00pm; Sun. - 9:00am-8:00pm.
(Images numbered top to bottom, left to right: John Michael Kilbane - 1, 2, 7, 8; Erin Chapman - 3, 4, 5, 6.)
* * *
John Michael Kilbane is a midwesterner recently transplanted to New York to intern for Lapham’s Quarterly. Now he is a sometimes writer, researcher and photography enthusiast trying to make it work in the big city. You can see his photography and writing evolve, hopefully for the better, at johnkilbane.tumblr.com and on Flickr.
Erin Chapman is a co-editor of The American Guide.
Zoom Info
CABELA’S - HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

The denuding of woodland tracts accounts in large part for the disappearance of elk and moose and the regrettable diminution of other forms of animal life in Pennsylvania. Early settlers found the wilderness teeming with game, the lakes and streams filled with fish, while the sun was often obscured for several minutes by dense flocks of migratory fowl.
—Pensylvannia, A Guide To the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

Guide note:The Cabela’s store in Hamburg, PA is the largest of the company’s 50 brick and mortar facilities, with 250,000 sq. ft. of taxidermy, firearms, ammunition, cafeteria and aquarium. Location: 100 Cabela Drive, Hamburg, PA, 19526. Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:00am-9:00pm; Sun. - 9:00am-8:00pm.
(Images numbered top to bottom, left to right: John Michael Kilbane - 1, 2, 7, 8; Erin Chapman - 3, 4, 5, 6.)
* * *
John Michael Kilbane is a midwesterner recently transplanted to New York to intern for Lapham’s Quarterly. Now he is a sometimes writer, researcher and photography enthusiast trying to make it work in the big city. You can see his photography and writing evolve, hopefully for the better, at johnkilbane.tumblr.com and on Flickr.
Erin Chapman is a co-editor of The American Guide.
Zoom Info
CABELA’S - HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

The denuding of woodland tracts accounts in large part for the disappearance of elk and moose and the regrettable diminution of other forms of animal life in Pennsylvania. Early settlers found the wilderness teeming with game, the lakes and streams filled with fish, while the sun was often obscured for several minutes by dense flocks of migratory fowl.
—Pensylvannia, A Guide To the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

Guide note:The Cabela’s store in Hamburg, PA is the largest of the company’s 50 brick and mortar facilities, with 250,000 sq. ft. of taxidermy, firearms, ammunition, cafeteria and aquarium. Location: 100 Cabela Drive, Hamburg, PA, 19526. Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:00am-9:00pm; Sun. - 9:00am-8:00pm.
(Images numbered top to bottom, left to right: John Michael Kilbane - 1, 2, 7, 8; Erin Chapman - 3, 4, 5, 6.)
* * *
John Michael Kilbane is a midwesterner recently transplanted to New York to intern for Lapham’s Quarterly. Now he is a sometimes writer, researcher and photography enthusiast trying to make it work in the big city. You can see his photography and writing evolve, hopefully for the better, at johnkilbane.tumblr.com and on Flickr.
Erin Chapman is a co-editor of The American Guide.
Zoom Info
CABELA’S - HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

The denuding of woodland tracts accounts in large part for the disappearance of elk and moose and the regrettable diminution of other forms of animal life in Pennsylvania. Early settlers found the wilderness teeming with game, the lakes and streams filled with fish, while the sun was often obscured for several minutes by dense flocks of migratory fowl.
—Pensylvannia, A Guide To the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

Guide note:The Cabela’s store in Hamburg, PA is the largest of the company’s 50 brick and mortar facilities, with 250,000 sq. ft. of taxidermy, firearms, ammunition, cafeteria and aquarium. Location: 100 Cabela Drive, Hamburg, PA, 19526. Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:00am-9:00pm; Sun. - 9:00am-8:00pm.
(Images numbered top to bottom, left to right: John Michael Kilbane - 1, 2, 7, 8; Erin Chapman - 3, 4, 5, 6.)
* * *
John Michael Kilbane is a midwesterner recently transplanted to New York to intern for Lapham’s Quarterly. Now he is a sometimes writer, researcher and photography enthusiast trying to make it work in the big city. You can see his photography and writing evolve, hopefully for the better, at johnkilbane.tumblr.com and on Flickr.
Erin Chapman is a co-editor of The American Guide.
Zoom Info
CABELA’S - HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

The denuding of woodland tracts accounts in large part for the disappearance of elk and moose and the regrettable diminution of other forms of animal life in Pennsylvania. Early settlers found the wilderness teeming with game, the lakes and streams filled with fish, while the sun was often obscured for several minutes by dense flocks of migratory fowl.
—Pensylvannia, A Guide To the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

Guide note:The Cabela’s store in Hamburg, PA is the largest of the company’s 50 brick and mortar facilities, with 250,000 sq. ft. of taxidermy, firearms, ammunition, cafeteria and aquarium. Location: 100 Cabela Drive, Hamburg, PA, 19526. Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:00am-9:00pm; Sun. - 9:00am-8:00pm.
(Images numbered top to bottom, left to right: John Michael Kilbane - 1, 2, 7, 8; Erin Chapman - 3, 4, 5, 6.)
* * *
John Michael Kilbane is a midwesterner recently transplanted to New York to intern for Lapham’s Quarterly. Now he is a sometimes writer, researcher and photography enthusiast trying to make it work in the big city. You can see his photography and writing evolve, hopefully for the better, at johnkilbane.tumblr.com and on Flickr.
Erin Chapman is a co-editor of The American Guide.
Zoom Info
CABELA’S - HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

The denuding of woodland tracts accounts in large part for the disappearance of elk and moose and the regrettable diminution of other forms of animal life in Pennsylvania. Early settlers found the wilderness teeming with game, the lakes and streams filled with fish, while the sun was often obscured for several minutes by dense flocks of migratory fowl.
—Pensylvannia, A Guide To the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

Guide note:The Cabela’s store in Hamburg, PA is the largest of the company’s 50 brick and mortar facilities, with 250,000 sq. ft. of taxidermy, firearms, ammunition, cafeteria and aquarium. Location: 100 Cabela Drive, Hamburg, PA, 19526. Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:00am-9:00pm; Sun. - 9:00am-8:00pm.
(Images numbered top to bottom, left to right: John Michael Kilbane - 1, 2, 7, 8; Erin Chapman - 3, 4, 5, 6.)
* * *
John Michael Kilbane is a midwesterner recently transplanted to New York to intern for Lapham’s Quarterly. Now he is a sometimes writer, researcher and photography enthusiast trying to make it work in the big city. You can see his photography and writing evolve, hopefully for the better, at johnkilbane.tumblr.com and on Flickr.
Erin Chapman is a co-editor of The American Guide.
Zoom Info
CABELA’S - HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

The denuding of woodland tracts accounts in large part for the disappearance of elk and moose and the regrettable diminution of other forms of animal life in Pennsylvania. Early settlers found the wilderness teeming with game, the lakes and streams filled with fish, while the sun was often obscured for several minutes by dense flocks of migratory fowl.
—Pensylvannia, A Guide To the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

Guide note:The Cabela’s store in Hamburg, PA is the largest of the company’s 50 brick and mortar facilities, with 250,000 sq. ft. of taxidermy, firearms, ammunition, cafeteria and aquarium. Location: 100 Cabela Drive, Hamburg, PA, 19526. Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:00am-9:00pm; Sun. - 9:00am-8:00pm.
(Images numbered top to bottom, left to right: John Michael Kilbane - 1, 2, 7, 8; Erin Chapman - 3, 4, 5, 6.)
* * *
John Michael Kilbane is a midwesterner recently transplanted to New York to intern for Lapham’s Quarterly. Now he is a sometimes writer, researcher and photography enthusiast trying to make it work in the big city. You can see his photography and writing evolve, hopefully for the better, at johnkilbane.tumblr.com and on Flickr.
Erin Chapman is a co-editor of The American Guide.
Zoom Info

CABELA’S - HAMBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

The denuding of woodland tracts accounts in large part for the disappearance of elk and moose and the regrettable diminution of other forms of animal life in Pennsylvania. Early settlers found the wilderness teeming with game, the lakes and streams filled with fish, while the sun was often obscured for several minutes by dense flocks of migratory fowl.

Pensylvannia, A Guide To the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

Guide note:The Cabela’s store in Hamburg, PA is the largest of the company’s 50 brick and mortar facilities, with 250,000 sq. ft. of taxidermy, firearms, ammunition, cafeteria and aquarium. Location: 100 Cabela Drive, Hamburg, PA, 19526. Hours: Mon-Sat - 8:00am-9:00pm; Sun. - 9:00am-8:00pm.

(Images numbered top to bottom, left to right: John Michael Kilbane - 1, 2, 7, 8; Erin Chapman - 3, 4, 5, 6.)

* * *

John Michael Kilbane is a midwesterner recently transplanted to New York to intern for Lapham’s Quarterly. Now he is a sometimes writer, researcher and photography enthusiast trying to make it work in the big city. You can see his photography and writing evolve, hopefully for the better, at johnkilbane.tumblr.com and on Flickr.

Erin Chapman is a co-editor of The American Guide.

A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO PITTSBURGH 
Pittsburgh has a charm and allure that sets it apart from the other great eastern cities. It’s not overwhelming. It has relatively little public transportation outside of its bus system. Its neighborhoods are each so unlike the others that at times it’s hard to believe one is still in Pittsburgh.
Pittsburgh’s charm is that of the Rust Belt city. Pittsburgh is a grade-A Rust Belt city: complete with dying industry along its waterfronts, dive bars (real dive bars) on every corner, what seems like hundreds of massive steel bridges, thousands of miles of railroad tracks and cheap everything.
Pittsburgh is not just another notch in the Rust Belt, though. It is much more than a has-been. Rather, it has consistently proven itself over the years to be one of the most dynamic and bold of American cities: malleable towards the new, yet unwilling to destroy the reminders of its fading past. A trip to Pittsburgh reveals at the same time new skyscrapers, a surprisingly resilient downtown, dynamic and changing neighborhoods and large cultural centers and districts — all along with the typical Rust Belt imagery of forgotten industry and abandoned factories.
There’s something for everyone in Pittsburgh. It has small city charm in the broad steel bones of a big city.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO PITTSBURGH 
Pittsburgh has a charm and allure that sets it apart from the other great eastern cities. It’s not overwhelming. It has relatively little public transportation outside of its bus system. Its neighborhoods are each so unlike the others that at times it’s hard to believe one is still in Pittsburgh.
Pittsburgh’s charm is that of the Rust Belt city. Pittsburgh is a grade-A Rust Belt city: complete with dying industry along its waterfronts, dive bars (real dive bars) on every corner, what seems like hundreds of massive steel bridges, thousands of miles of railroad tracks and cheap everything.
Pittsburgh is not just another notch in the Rust Belt, though. It is much more than a has-been. Rather, it has consistently proven itself over the years to be one of the most dynamic and bold of American cities: malleable towards the new, yet unwilling to destroy the reminders of its fading past. A trip to Pittsburgh reveals at the same time new skyscrapers, a surprisingly resilient downtown, dynamic and changing neighborhoods and large cultural centers and districts — all along with the typical Rust Belt imagery of forgotten industry and abandoned factories.
There’s something for everyone in Pittsburgh. It has small city charm in the broad steel bones of a big city.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO PITTSBURGH 
Pittsburgh has a charm and allure that sets it apart from the other great eastern cities. It’s not overwhelming. It has relatively little public transportation outside of its bus system. Its neighborhoods are each so unlike the others that at times it’s hard to believe one is still in Pittsburgh.
Pittsburgh’s charm is that of the Rust Belt city. Pittsburgh is a grade-A Rust Belt city: complete with dying industry along its waterfronts, dive bars (real dive bars) on every corner, what seems like hundreds of massive steel bridges, thousands of miles of railroad tracks and cheap everything.
Pittsburgh is not just another notch in the Rust Belt, though. It is much more than a has-been. Rather, it has consistently proven itself over the years to be one of the most dynamic and bold of American cities: malleable towards the new, yet unwilling to destroy the reminders of its fading past. A trip to Pittsburgh reveals at the same time new skyscrapers, a surprisingly resilient downtown, dynamic and changing neighborhoods and large cultural centers and districts — all along with the typical Rust Belt imagery of forgotten industry and abandoned factories.
There’s something for everyone in Pittsburgh. It has small city charm in the broad steel bones of a big city.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO PITTSBURGH 
Pittsburgh has a charm and allure that sets it apart from the other great eastern cities. It’s not overwhelming. It has relatively little public transportation outside of its bus system. Its neighborhoods are each so unlike the others that at times it’s hard to believe one is still in Pittsburgh.
Pittsburgh’s charm is that of the Rust Belt city. Pittsburgh is a grade-A Rust Belt city: complete with dying industry along its waterfronts, dive bars (real dive bars) on every corner, what seems like hundreds of massive steel bridges, thousands of miles of railroad tracks and cheap everything.
Pittsburgh is not just another notch in the Rust Belt, though. It is much more than a has-been. Rather, it has consistently proven itself over the years to be one of the most dynamic and bold of American cities: malleable towards the new, yet unwilling to destroy the reminders of its fading past. A trip to Pittsburgh reveals at the same time new skyscrapers, a surprisingly resilient downtown, dynamic and changing neighborhoods and large cultural centers and districts — all along with the typical Rust Belt imagery of forgotten industry and abandoned factories.
There’s something for everyone in Pittsburgh. It has small city charm in the broad steel bones of a big city.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info

A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO PITTSBURGH

Pittsburgh has a charm and allure that sets it apart from the other great eastern cities. It’s not overwhelming. It has relatively little public transportation outside of its bus system. Its neighborhoods are each so unlike the others that at times it’s hard to believe one is still in Pittsburgh.

Pittsburgh’s charm is that of the Rust Belt city. Pittsburgh is a grade-A Rust Belt city: complete with dying industry along its waterfronts, dive bars (real dive bars) on every corner, what seems like hundreds of massive steel bridges, thousands of miles of railroad tracks and cheap everything.

Pittsburgh is not just another notch in the Rust Belt, though. It is much more than a has-been. Rather, it has consistently proven itself over the years to be one of the most dynamic and bold of American cities: malleable towards the new, yet unwilling to destroy the reminders of its fading past. A trip to Pittsburgh reveals at the same time new skyscrapers, a surprisingly resilient downtown, dynamic and changing neighborhoods and large cultural centers and districts — all along with the typical Rust Belt imagery of forgotten industry and abandoned factories.

There’s something for everyone in Pittsburgh. It has small city charm in the broad steel bones of a big city.

* * *

Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.

SCENES FROM THE RUST BELT

I am here in a most wonderful out-of-the-world place, which looks as if it had begun to be built yesterday, and were going to be imperfectly knocked together with a nail or two the day after tomorrow.

—Letter from Charles Dickens upon visiting Syracuse in 1869, quoted in New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Images, from top to bottom, left to right:

1. Syracuse, NY

2. Syracuse, NY

3. Etna, PA

4. Cleveland, OH

5. Pittsburgh, PA

6. Braddock, PA

7. Stowe Township, PA

8. Stratton, OH

9. Syracuse, NY

* * *

Dan Wetmore is from Pittsburgh, PA. He could have been from Buffalo or Cleveland and the story would have been the same: he developed a fondness for the rich industrial history and aesthetic that surrounded him. Still, he could have been from Miami or LA: he digs photo. He received his BFA from Syracuse University in 2013 and still lives there—immersed in the photo community, a TA at the university, a lab intern at Light Work. He works at a food cooperative, drives and maintains a Buick wagon and is into local food. Find more of his work on his website, cargocollective.com/danwetmore, follow him on Tumblr at dans240z.tumblr.com and check out Golden Dawn, his upcoming show at Light Work in Syracuse (3/17-5/30/14).

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

POLISH-AMERICANS - PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

The Polish Falcons of America check in with a dispatch for Field Assignment #7 - Ethnography. Definitely check out their Tumblr, as they have some fantastic archival images - there are some amazing folk costumes and feats of physical strength. (Plus, we love this welcoming committee!)

Winter is upon us once again and, for many of us, that means that it’s time to pull our hats and gloves out of storage and whip up a big batch of hot cocoa. For Polish-Americans in Pittsburgh, Pa., the arrival of winter also used to mean that it was time for the annual Polish Mart, a celebration of Polish heritage that was held for many years at the Polish Falcons’ auditorium in Pittsburgh’s South Side neighborhood. 

The first annual Polish Mart was held in 1940 and the tradition continued for more than five decades. It was started as a fundraiser for the Polish Falcons, a national fraternal benefit society that still has its headquarters in Pittsburgh. The booths at the event offered a variety of Polish arts and crafts, as well as delicious Polish foods and candies. Many Falconettes would spend the entire year preparing the goods that they would sell at the Polish Mart. Nancy Capozoli, whose mother was chairman of the Polish Mart for more than 25 years, fondly remembers making fancy jars of candy for her mother’s candy booth.

Pittsburgh has a large Polish-American community—nearly 10% of Pittsburghers have some Polish heritage. It’s easy to find evidence of this heritage in Pittsburgh, too, whether you’re looking at place names (like Polish Hill and Kosciuszko Street), stopping by one of the many Polish restaurants and delis for some pierogi and bigos, or visiting the Polish Nationality Room in Pittsburgh’s famous Cathedral of Learning. Even though the Polish Mart is no longer held at the Polish Falcons headquarters in Pittsburgh, staying connected with their heritage is still important to this city’s Polish-Americans. The Polish Falcons of America organization runs a blog, The PFA Online Museum, to share historical photographs like this one with the public and to help people connect with their heritage.  

* * *

Find the Polish Falcons Museum on Tumblr at polishfalcons.tumblr.com, on their main website, polishfalcons.org, or on their Facebook page, facebook.com/pfanational.

KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.
—Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 
* * *
Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.
Zoom Info
KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.
—Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 
* * *
Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.
Zoom Info
KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.
—Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 
* * *
Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.
Zoom Info
KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.
—Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 
* * *
Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.
Zoom Info
KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.
—Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 
* * *
Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.
Zoom Info
KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.
—Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 
* * *
Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.
Zoom Info
KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.
—Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 
* * *
Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.
Zoom Info
KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.
—Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 
* * *
Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.
Zoom Info
KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.
—Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 
* * *
Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.
Zoom Info

KENSINGTON - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The names Frankford and Kensington persist merely as sentimental recollections of the time prior to January 31, 1854, when they were independent municipalities, already industrialized and thriving. There lingers still an occasional weed-infested field where the hum of crickets provides an obbligato to the blatancy of neighboring factories, but these are being slowly and surely eliminated.

Philadelphia, A Guide the Nation’s Birthplace (WPA, 1937)

Friend to the American Guide, Jordan Baumgarten shares a look at his neighborhood of Kensington, where it appears weeds are now outpacing factories. Jordan is also a teacher at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center. Keep an eye on their Teen Photo Program’s blog at ppacteenphoto.tumblr.com - we’re loving it. 

* * *

Jordan Baumgarten was born in Philadelphia and returned a couple of years ago, falling back in love with the city again, with the things that make it horrible and wonderful. Follow him on Tumblr at baumgartenblog.org and find his website at jordanbaumgarten.com.

CONNEAUT LAKE PARK - PENNSYLVANIA

Chelsea Gunn reports for AG Week from the semi-ruins of a Pennsylvania landmark: Conneaut Lake Park. She writes:

Back in September, Nathan and I visited my hometown in Pennsylvania and stopped in to explore Conneaut Lake Park. It’s the amusement park  I grew up visiting and of which my grandparents were once partial owners. The park has since fallen on hard times, passing from owner to owner, surviving a fire and struggling to stay open. Though technically closed, the park is open to walk through and explore during the daytime.

It amazed me and gave me the chills to see that all the rides were the exact same ones I rode as a kid over 20 years ago. The roller coaster, “The Blue Streak,” is the seventeenth oldest wooden roller coasters in operation in the country. I have incredibly fond memories of this place and I hope it’s able to stay open in the future. 

° ° °

Chelsea Gunn is an archivist and writer from Corvallis, Oregon, and Meadville, Pennsylvania, now living in Providence, Rhode Island.  She’s obsessed with the question of what happens to our diaries when we die. 

Follow on Tumblr at chelseagunn.tumblr.com and chelseagunn.com

IRON AND SMOKE - PENNSYLVANIA, NEW YORK and NEW JERSEY
From the smoke-smudged factories and rail lines of Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey, your Guide to the Northeast Chris Giuliano checks in for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

Some of these factories and railroads are still in use, some are not. Most of these photos were taken in Pennsylvania, with the exception of two in NJ and NY. The northeast used to be an area abounding in industrial wealth and overflowing with jobs. However, with the United States’ transition from a manufacturing economy to a service economy over the last 40 or so years (which happened just as quickly as the transition to a manufacturing economy), numberless warehouses and factories have closed their doors and shuttered their windows. In spite of this, there is still an abundance of heavy industry in the northeast, whether it be the massive gas refineries of Philadelphia and New Jersey, or the coal mines and quarries of central and western Pennsylvania. I hope that these photos can begin to connect the dots between the industry of yesteryear and that of the present day. They attempt to tell the story of the factories and railroads, as well as the carriers of industry themselves (Norfolk Southern and CSX trains), which changed the face of America during the late 19th century and which continue to drive America onward today.

* * *
Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info
IRON AND SMOKE - PENNSYLVANIA, NEW YORK and NEW JERSEY
From the smoke-smudged factories and rail lines of Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey, your Guide to the Northeast Chris Giuliano checks in for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

Some of these factories and railroads are still in use, some are not. Most of these photos were taken in Pennsylvania, with the exception of two in NJ and NY. The northeast used to be an area abounding in industrial wealth and overflowing with jobs. However, with the United States’ transition from a manufacturing economy to a service economy over the last 40 or so years (which happened just as quickly as the transition to a manufacturing economy), numberless warehouses and factories have closed their doors and shuttered their windows. In spite of this, there is still an abundance of heavy industry in the northeast, whether it be the massive gas refineries of Philadelphia and New Jersey, or the coal mines and quarries of central and western Pennsylvania. I hope that these photos can begin to connect the dots between the industry of yesteryear and that of the present day. They attempt to tell the story of the factories and railroads, as well as the carriers of industry themselves (Norfolk Southern and CSX trains), which changed the face of America during the late 19th century and which continue to drive America onward today.

* * *
Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info
IRON AND SMOKE - PENNSYLVANIA, NEW YORK and NEW JERSEY
From the smoke-smudged factories and rail lines of Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey, your Guide to the Northeast Chris Giuliano checks in for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

Some of these factories and railroads are still in use, some are not. Most of these photos were taken in Pennsylvania, with the exception of two in NJ and NY. The northeast used to be an area abounding in industrial wealth and overflowing with jobs. However, with the United States’ transition from a manufacturing economy to a service economy over the last 40 or so years (which happened just as quickly as the transition to a manufacturing economy), numberless warehouses and factories have closed their doors and shuttered their windows. In spite of this, there is still an abundance of heavy industry in the northeast, whether it be the massive gas refineries of Philadelphia and New Jersey, or the coal mines and quarries of central and western Pennsylvania. I hope that these photos can begin to connect the dots between the industry of yesteryear and that of the present day. They attempt to tell the story of the factories and railroads, as well as the carriers of industry themselves (Norfolk Southern and CSX trains), which changed the face of America during the late 19th century and which continue to drive America onward today.

* * *
Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info

IRON AND SMOKE - PENNSYLVANIA, NEW YORK and NEW JERSEY

From the smoke-smudged factories and rail lines of Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey, your Guide to the Northeast Chris Giuliano checks in for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

Some of these factories and railroads are still in use, some are not. Most of these photos were taken in Pennsylvania, with the exception of two in NJ and NY. The northeast used to be an area abounding in industrial wealth and overflowing with jobs. However, with the United States’ transition from a manufacturing economy to a service economy over the last 40 or so years (which happened just as quickly as the transition to a manufacturing economy), numberless warehouses and factories have closed their doors and shuttered their windows. In spite of this, there is still an abundance of heavy industry in the northeast, whether it be the massive gas refineries of Philadelphia and New Jersey, or the coal mines and quarries of central and western Pennsylvania. I hope that these photos can begin to connect the dots between the industry of yesteryear and that of the present day. They attempt to tell the story of the factories and railroads, as well as the carriers of industry themselves (Norfolk Southern and CSX trains), which changed the face of America during the late 19th century and which continue to drive America onward today.

* * *

Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.

A BRIEF GUIDE TO PHILLY, WHICH BEGINS WITH FDR SKATEPARK - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
First Stop. FDR skatepark (pictured, 1, 2) is a homemade, DIY skatepark made by skaters and beautified by some of Philly’s best graffiti artists. It’s one of the city’s greatest community projects, gathering so many people together and embodies what it means to be both a skateboarder and a city dweller.
Stop Two. From FDR, you go next to cheesesteaks. This cheesesteak (pictured, 3) is from Pat’s, which is one of the more popular and touristy spots. There are probably better places to find a good cheesesteak in town, but, in terms of atmosphere, it doesn’t get much better than Pat’s (located at the south end of the Italian Market in South Philly).
Stop Three. If there’s one thing other than cheesesteaks that Philadelphia abounds in, it’s abandoned factories. Like many great cities of the northeast, it was once a center of manufacturing and industry; nicknamed the “Workshop of the World” for its industrial Delaware waterfront in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This empty factory with the smokeless smokestacks (pictured, 4) is located in Pennsport, an industrial section of the city that doesn’t get as much action as it once did.
Stop Four. A pretty typical Philly street (pictured, 5), consisting of mostly two and sometimes three story rowhomes. Most residential streets outside of Center city — whether North, South or West — look something like this. These houses are what’s left of working class Philly. That’s not to say the city isn’t a working class city, it’s just not working class in the traditional last century definition of the word (see Stop Three above, the empty factory in Pennsport).
Stop Five. The Ben Franklin Bridge (pictured, 6; view from) looks down Second Street. You can see Mr. Bar Stool, Christ Church, the US Customs House Building, and, finally, the Society Hill Towers by I.M. Pei.
Last Stop. (Pictured, 7: “203 homicides so far this year in Philadelphia.”) A reminder of a Philly plagued by crime, drug trade and prostitution. A bit of perspective from a local church into what daily life is like for a lot of Philadelphians, and how many families are affected by violence.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO PHILLY, WHICH BEGINS WITH FDR SKATEPARK - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
First Stop. FDR skatepark (pictured, 1, 2) is a homemade, DIY skatepark made by skaters and beautified by some of Philly’s best graffiti artists. It’s one of the city’s greatest community projects, gathering so many people together and embodies what it means to be both a skateboarder and a city dweller.
Stop Two. From FDR, you go next to cheesesteaks. This cheesesteak (pictured, 3) is from Pat’s, which is one of the more popular and touristy spots. There are probably better places to find a good cheesesteak in town, but, in terms of atmosphere, it doesn’t get much better than Pat’s (located at the south end of the Italian Market in South Philly).
Stop Three. If there’s one thing other than cheesesteaks that Philadelphia abounds in, it’s abandoned factories. Like many great cities of the northeast, it was once a center of manufacturing and industry; nicknamed the “Workshop of the World” for its industrial Delaware waterfront in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This empty factory with the smokeless smokestacks (pictured, 4) is located in Pennsport, an industrial section of the city that doesn’t get as much action as it once did.
Stop Four. A pretty typical Philly street (pictured, 5), consisting of mostly two and sometimes three story rowhomes. Most residential streets outside of Center city — whether North, South or West — look something like this. These houses are what’s left of working class Philly. That’s not to say the city isn’t a working class city, it’s just not working class in the traditional last century definition of the word (see Stop Three above, the empty factory in Pennsport).
Stop Five. The Ben Franklin Bridge (pictured, 6; view from) looks down Second Street. You can see Mr. Bar Stool, Christ Church, the US Customs House Building, and, finally, the Society Hill Towers by I.M. Pei.
Last Stop. (Pictured, 7: “203 homicides so far this year in Philadelphia.”) A reminder of a Philly plagued by crime, drug trade and prostitution. A bit of perspective from a local church into what daily life is like for a lot of Philadelphians, and how many families are affected by violence.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO PHILLY, WHICH BEGINS WITH FDR SKATEPARK - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
First Stop. FDR skatepark (pictured, 1, 2) is a homemade, DIY skatepark made by skaters and beautified by some of Philly’s best graffiti artists. It’s one of the city’s greatest community projects, gathering so many people together and embodies what it means to be both a skateboarder and a city dweller.
Stop Two. From FDR, you go next to cheesesteaks. This cheesesteak (pictured, 3) is from Pat’s, which is one of the more popular and touristy spots. There are probably better places to find a good cheesesteak in town, but, in terms of atmosphere, it doesn’t get much better than Pat’s (located at the south end of the Italian Market in South Philly).
Stop Three. If there’s one thing other than cheesesteaks that Philadelphia abounds in, it’s abandoned factories. Like many great cities of the northeast, it was once a center of manufacturing and industry; nicknamed the “Workshop of the World” for its industrial Delaware waterfront in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This empty factory with the smokeless smokestacks (pictured, 4) is located in Pennsport, an industrial section of the city that doesn’t get as much action as it once did.
Stop Four. A pretty typical Philly street (pictured, 5), consisting of mostly two and sometimes three story rowhomes. Most residential streets outside of Center city — whether North, South or West — look something like this. These houses are what’s left of working class Philly. That’s not to say the city isn’t a working class city, it’s just not working class in the traditional last century definition of the word (see Stop Three above, the empty factory in Pennsport).
Stop Five. The Ben Franklin Bridge (pictured, 6; view from) looks down Second Street. You can see Mr. Bar Stool, Christ Church, the US Customs House Building, and, finally, the Society Hill Towers by I.M. Pei.
Last Stop. (Pictured, 7: “203 homicides so far this year in Philadelphia.”) A reminder of a Philly plagued by crime, drug trade and prostitution. A bit of perspective from a local church into what daily life is like for a lot of Philadelphians, and how many families are affected by violence.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info

A BRIEF GUIDE TO PHILLY, WHICH BEGINS WITH FDR SKATEPARK - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

First Stop. FDR skatepark (pictured, 1, 2) is a homemade, DIY skatepark made by skaters and beautified by some of Philly’s best graffiti artists. It’s one of the city’s greatest community projects, gathering so many people together and embodies what it means to be both a skateboarder and a city dweller.

Stop Two. From FDR, you go next to cheesesteaks. This cheesesteak (pictured, 3) is from Pat’s, which is one of the more popular and touristy spots. There are probably better places to find a good cheesesteak in town, but, in terms of atmosphere, it doesn’t get much better than Pat’s (located at the south end of the Italian Market in South Philly).

Stop Three. If there’s one thing other than cheesesteaks that Philadelphia abounds in, it’s abandoned factories. Like many great cities of the northeast, it was once a center of manufacturing and industry; nicknamed the “Workshop of the World” for its industrial Delaware waterfront in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This empty factory with the smokeless smokestacks (pictured, 4) is located in Pennsport, an industrial section of the city that doesn’t get as much action as it once did.

Stop Four. A pretty typical Philly street (pictured, 5), consisting of mostly two and sometimes three story rowhomes. Most residential streets outside of Center city — whether North, South or West — look something like this. These houses are what’s left of working class Philly. That’s not to say the city isn’t a working class city, it’s just not working class in the traditional last century definition of the word (see Stop Three above, the empty factory in Pennsport).

Stop Five. The Ben Franklin Bridge (pictured, 6; view from) looks down Second Street. You can see Mr. Bar Stool, Christ Church, the US Customs House Building, and, finally, the Society Hill Towers by I.M. Pei.

Last Stop. (Pictured, 7: “203 homicides so far this year in Philadelphia.”) A reminder of a Philly plagued by crime, drug trade and prostitution. A bit of perspective from a local church into what daily life is like for a lot of Philadelphians, and how many families are affected by violence.

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Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.

STEEL & RIVER - PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA - STATION TO STATION

Pittsburgh’s a city of steel and river. Its architecture, its buildings are skeletal: bare like bones. Water flows in, around and through it like blood in veins. The muscle is its people. These elements collide on the North Shore waterfront just outside Heinz Field, home to Steelers football on any given Sunday

There are some 24,000 boats registered in Allegheny County – one for every 13 city residents. And it looks like half of them are there on game day, at the confluence of the Allegheny and Ohio Rivers. So while summer holds out — before it gives way to fall and fall succumbs to winter — the water’s colors shift: river gray to Steeler yellow and black.

Today is opening day and most have tied up their boats a week in advance to grab prime real estate. Big screen TVs, generous buffets and coolers of beer line the wharf. Friendly Pittsburghers are quick with a cold one and good words about their city. 

When did you show up?

“Two weeks ago. Started partying around eight this morning, most will be here past dark.” 

What’s the score?

"Doesn’t really matter who wins, as long as I get that white envelope on Tuesday. You know what I’m saying? The numbers."

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Erin Chapman and Tom McNamara are co-editors of THE AMERICAN GUIDE.

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THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Stop: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

 Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]