INDIANA

Here the prairie starts its westward sweep…

Indiana, A Guide To the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

…The “This Way” sign is located right outside the town of Maukport, Indiana.  Maukport is a small town (population 81) only a stone’s throw from the Ohio River.  I spoke at length with the owner of the Riverbottom Inn, a local dive, and she said most of the people in the town were forced out when it flooded around a decade ago.  

…The truck on the road is near Starlight, Indiana, my mother’s hometown. Starlight is built on a network of hills and the only way to get to any part of the town is to drive up them. 

…The woman sitting in the pew is attending a 8:00am service at St. John the Baptist Church in Starlight, Indiana.

…”Jack’s” is a pool hall located in New Albany, Kentucky. It’s one of the only bars left in town where you can still smoke.  Believe me when I say that people that play there are serious about pool.

…The woman reading the paper is sitting in a public library in Corydon, Indiana.

…The man in the stables is a traveling blacksmith.  He had arrived to reattach a horse shoe to a race horse on a farm in Borden, Indiana.

…The sprinkler in the yard was in a small suburb of Salem Indiana, just before dusk. 

* * *

Guide to the Midwest Tom Hoying is a documentary photographer and photo illustrator living and working in Columbus, OH.  He spends his free time traveling across the midwest working on long term documentary photo projects. You can view more of his work on his website, tomhoying.com and his tumblr, tomhoying.tumblr.com.

SMALL TOWN DINERS - INDIANA

Meals served in smartly fronted little restaurants and lunch stands retain the unmistakable tang of country cooking. 

Indiana: A Guide to the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

Small town diners in Indiana: stop in a good one and you will likely meet some incredible people; owners who love to cook and are adept at running a business on a shoestring. Small town cafes are personal spaces that reflect the ups and downs of their surrounding community.  They provide a central meeting spot and a sociable place to eat alone.

How to rate a café in the Hoosier state? If hand-breaded tenderloin and homemade pie are on the menu, your order will not disappoint.

Guide Notes:

—locations—

  1. Mary Ann Rubio, Family Café, Knox, IN
  2. The Grill, LaCrosse, IN
  3. Happy Days Café, Wakarusa, IN
  4. White House Hamburgers, Logansport, IN
  5. Hamlet Café, Hamlet, IN
  6. Crockpot Café, Walkerton, IN
  7. Teel’s Family Restaurant, Mentone, IN
  8. Northside Diner, Chesterton, IN
  9. The Nook, Columbia City, IN
  10. Woodland Inn, Woodland, IN

* * *

Kay Westhues is a photographer based in South Bend, IN. Through her work she aims to describe the vitality and complexity of places and people whose lives are often overlooked and unexamined. She is inspired by the ways rural tradition and history are interpreted and transformed in the present day. You can see more of her work at kaywesthues.com or follow her latest project on tumblr (kwesthues.tumblr.com).

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
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A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info

A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.

With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.

This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”

Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *

Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

MARDI GRAS - NEW ORLEANS, LOUSIANA

Mardi Gras, that maddest of all mad days when every man may be a king, or, if he prefers, a tramp or a clown or an Indian chief, and dance in the streets. 

New Orleans City Guide (WPA, 1938)

If you didn’t come to party, take your bitch ass home,” shouts the man selling t-shirts on Bourbon Street. He adds, “I have size sexy for the ladies.”

The main street for Carnival Season partying in New Orleans has a distinct aroma—a mix of sweat, crawfish, Daiquiri puke and just-starting-to-rot garbage. All around the senses are assaulted with beads thrown from above, shoes getting stuck to the sticky wash that covers the street, drummers drumming, people shouting and bursts of purple, gold and green. Mardi Gras has been taking place in New Orleans since before 1835. It is a time for the loud, the grotesque, the strange and excess. While this might sound awful, it is intoxicating. The season has lasted all these years because it is what you make it.

Everyone has a different experience because no one is in charge and the celebration spreads throughout the city. If you came to party, you will find one on Bourbon. I saw lots of tits, a couple asses, hundreds of hollow plastic legs dangling around people’s necks filled with red liquor, people tumbling after one too many and too many crazy outfits to count.

The balcony people taunt the crowds below. Some put fancy trinkets on fishing wire to yank the items out of greedy, eager hands. They lay in wait to judge who is deserving of the beads. Sometimes it requires a dance or a flash and sometimes they take pity on a cute nine-year-old who is getting quite an eyeful.

Just one street over, there is the opportunity for family friendly fare. Royal Street, which turns into St. Charles when heading Uptown, is filled with jugglers and street musicians, and is also the main parade route for the bigger parades. Smartly, the first couple rows of people have chairs and right behind, people set up ladders with elaborate boxes for children to sit in for a better view. There is definitely alcohol, but people try to keep it together a little more here.

Quintron and Miss Pussycat are playing at the Spellcaster Lodge with Jello Biafra in attendance and Big Freedia is bouncing at VASO. There are fancy balls with high society that are by invitation only and parades that are solely for the people who know where they start and stop.

It can also be a time for the political. Different Krewes head different parades, all with unique themes for the year. The Krewe d’Etat is known for its biting satire and this year was no different with floats criticizing the sex trade and prison system. The Zulu Parade, that goes through the neighborhood torn apart by the freeway, celebrated the life of Nelson Mandela this year.

For me, Mardi Gras was cruising the city by bicycle and taking in the sites and sounds. The majority of the time it was a delight. Walking and making photographs, I was moved to tears during the Talladega College Marching Band’s version of Get Lucky and was surprised to find how amazing it is to make eye contact with someone on a giant float and catching the beads thrown right at me. And I already miss the smell.

Mark Twain said: “I think that I may say that an American has not seen the United States until he has seen Mardi-Gras in New Orleans.” 

* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website, TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press.

RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
Zoom Info
RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
Zoom Info
RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
Zoom Info

RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…

—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.

In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  

Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.

While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.

During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.

With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   

After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.

Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.

 * * *

April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.

Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.

FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
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FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info

FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.

Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *

Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.

North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.

Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.

* * *

Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.

CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info

CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA

This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 

Guide Notes:

  • The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
  • 12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
  • chinoskateexpress.com

* * *

At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.

'ELYSIAN FIELDS' - WISCONSIN

Some of these Wisconsin vehicles outlasted the weather and ravages of time to become daily drivers. Others found their Elysian Fields, which is where heroes went after their deaths in Greek mythology.

A broke-down automobile can sometimes have the look of a fallen hero. 

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

JOY PROM - JOHNSON CITY, TENNESSEE

"Young man, there’s no need to feel down. Young man, get yourself off the ground" — pumps from the speakers, the trumpets blare and then — "It’s fun to stay at the Y.M.C.A." — and hundreds of arms extend into the sky while red and blue lights flash from the stage.

Grace Fellowship in Johnson City, Tennessee, joined the Joy Prom movement in 2011 and are continuing to go strong along with other groups in Las Vegas, Charlotte and more. The guests of this prom range in age from knee-high to a grasshopper to older than 60 and have a range of special needs. Everyone at the event has the common goal of dancin’ their ass off and having a good time.

The night starts with the red carpet, where the attendees are announced and they enter dressed to the nines. Once at the party, you can get a horse drawn carriage ride, play Wii or air hockey, get your photo taken at the photo booth with a wacky mustache or big boa, or sit around and visit.

After dinner is served and all have eaten, the DJ starts the music. Some roll out to the dance floor while others strut — and everyone dances.

Like out of a movie, while Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” is spinning one young woman hops on the stage and does the entire choreography without missing a beat. The crowd cheers and she is not without a dance partner for the rest of the night. Couples smooch and slow dance and many are spun during a fast number. The music is hit after hit and it seems like barely a minute has passed before the lights come up and it is time to go home.

Guide Note: If you or a family member has special needs, consider finding a Joy Prom near you to attend. If you have photography skills, have mean dance moves or have experience with food service, consider volunteering at the prom. (It’s the only time you’ll see me dance in public.)

* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website, TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press.