THE HINDU TEMPLE SOCIETY - QUEENS, NEW YORK

Did you know that in addition to American Guide Week, it’s Animal Week over at the amazing Atlas Obscura? If you haven’t seen the incredible Lake Monsters of America map, get over there now. In order to help celebrate Animal Week, we dug up an American Guide dispatch on the day an elephant walked the streets of Queens.

Amidst the detached houses and backyard kiddie pools of Flushing, Queens, the elephant-headed Lord Ganesha receives visitors and devotees to the Hindu Temple Society of North America’s Šri Mahã Vallabha Ganapati Devasthãnam. As the presiding deity and a prominent god in the Hindu pantheon, Lord Ganesha’s shrine sits at the focal point of the sunlit temple space.  

Ganesha, the son of Shiva, is the remover of obstacles and inspires intense devotion in the worshippers who come to ask his blessings. Temple-goers bring offerings on a daily basis, but for special occasions — such as Ganesha’s birthday, Ganesh Chaturthi — elaborate gifts of food are presented. In 1995, the “milk miracle” was witnessed at the Queens temple when brass statues of Ganesha reportedly drank milk offerings held under their trunks.

For particularly auspicious ceremonies like the consecration of altars or the infusion of divine energy into temple statues, a live elephant attends the festivities. Upon the Temple’s re-consecration in 2009, Minnie the elephant graciously accepted the respectful touches and offerings of an admiring crowd. (Minnie’s trainer mentioned that she also does weddings.)

You can see more photos and details on how to visit the Temple over at Atlas Obscura.

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Atlas Obscura is the definitive guide to the world’s wondrous and curious places. If you’re searching for MINIATURE CITIESGLASS FLOWERSBOOKS BOUND IN HUMAN SKINGIGANTIC FLAMING HOLES IN THE GROUNDBONE CHURCHESBALANCING PAGODAS, or HOMES BUILT ENTIRELY OUT OF PAPER, Atlas Obscura is where you’ll find them.

Find them at AtlasObscura.com and follow them on Tumblr at atlasobscura.tumblr.com

PANORAMA OF NEW YORK, QUEENS MUSEUM OF ART - NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Amazing modeling sent in to American Guide Week by Matt Bergstrom of Wurlington Bros. Press, which makes their own amazing modeling:

The world’s largest scale city model is the Panorama of New York at the Queens Museum of Art, originally built for the 1964 World’s Fair. The model encompasses all five boroughs of the city, with 830,000 little buildings made from wood and plastic on 9335 square feet. Over 100 craftsmen worked for 3 years using plat maps, aerial photos and field surveys to recreate the mini city as accurately as possible.
There are many other scale model cities around the world, but few encompass the entire urban area from the skyscrapers of downtown all the way out to the smaller dwellings of the far-flung city outskirts.

* * *
Matt Bergstrom grew up in Minneapolis but now lives in Chicago, where he runs Wurlington Press, a publisher of architectural souvenir postcards and Viewmaster 3D photos. See the wonders of Wurlington at www.wurlington-bros.com and on Tumblr at wurlington.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
PANORAMA OF NEW YORK, QUEENS MUSEUM OF ART - NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Amazing modeling sent in to American Guide Week by Matt Bergstrom of Wurlington Bros. Press, which makes their own amazing modeling:

The world’s largest scale city model is the Panorama of New York at the Queens Museum of Art, originally built for the 1964 World’s Fair. The model encompasses all five boroughs of the city, with 830,000 little buildings made from wood and plastic on 9335 square feet. Over 100 craftsmen worked for 3 years using plat maps, aerial photos and field surveys to recreate the mini city as accurately as possible.
There are many other scale model cities around the world, but few encompass the entire urban area from the skyscrapers of downtown all the way out to the smaller dwellings of the far-flung city outskirts.

* * *
Matt Bergstrom grew up in Minneapolis but now lives in Chicago, where he runs Wurlington Press, a publisher of architectural souvenir postcards and Viewmaster 3D photos. See the wonders of Wurlington at www.wurlington-bros.com and on Tumblr at wurlington.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
PANORAMA OF NEW YORK, QUEENS MUSEUM OF ART - NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Amazing modeling sent in to American Guide Week by Matt Bergstrom of Wurlington Bros. Press, which makes their own amazing modeling:

The world’s largest scale city model is the Panorama of New York at the Queens Museum of Art, originally built for the 1964 World’s Fair. The model encompasses all five boroughs of the city, with 830,000 little buildings made from wood and plastic on 9335 square feet. Over 100 craftsmen worked for 3 years using plat maps, aerial photos and field surveys to recreate the mini city as accurately as possible.
There are many other scale model cities around the world, but few encompass the entire urban area from the skyscrapers of downtown all the way out to the smaller dwellings of the far-flung city outskirts.

* * *
Matt Bergstrom grew up in Minneapolis but now lives in Chicago, where he runs Wurlington Press, a publisher of architectural souvenir postcards and Viewmaster 3D photos. See the wonders of Wurlington at www.wurlington-bros.com and on Tumblr at wurlington.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
PANORAMA OF NEW YORK, QUEENS MUSEUM OF ART - NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Amazing modeling sent in to American Guide Week by Matt Bergstrom of Wurlington Bros. Press, which makes their own amazing modeling:

The world’s largest scale city model is the Panorama of New York at the Queens Museum of Art, originally built for the 1964 World’s Fair. The model encompasses all five boroughs of the city, with 830,000 little buildings made from wood and plastic on 9335 square feet. Over 100 craftsmen worked for 3 years using plat maps, aerial photos and field surveys to recreate the mini city as accurately as possible.
There are many other scale model cities around the world, but few encompass the entire urban area from the skyscrapers of downtown all the way out to the smaller dwellings of the far-flung city outskirts.

* * *
Matt Bergstrom grew up in Minneapolis but now lives in Chicago, where he runs Wurlington Press, a publisher of architectural souvenir postcards and Viewmaster 3D photos. See the wonders of Wurlington at www.wurlington-bros.com and on Tumblr at wurlington.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
PANORAMA OF NEW YORK, QUEENS MUSEUM OF ART - NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Amazing modeling sent in to American Guide Week by Matt Bergstrom of Wurlington Bros. Press, which makes their own amazing modeling:

The world’s largest scale city model is the Panorama of New York at the Queens Museum of Art, originally built for the 1964 World’s Fair. The model encompasses all five boroughs of the city, with 830,000 little buildings made from wood and plastic on 9335 square feet. Over 100 craftsmen worked for 3 years using plat maps, aerial photos and field surveys to recreate the mini city as accurately as possible.
There are many other scale model cities around the world, but few encompass the entire urban area from the skyscrapers of downtown all the way out to the smaller dwellings of the far-flung city outskirts.

* * *
Matt Bergstrom grew up in Minneapolis but now lives in Chicago, where he runs Wurlington Press, a publisher of architectural souvenir postcards and Viewmaster 3D photos. See the wonders of Wurlington at www.wurlington-bros.com and on Tumblr at wurlington.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
PANORAMA OF NEW YORK, QUEENS MUSEUM OF ART - NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Amazing modeling sent in to American Guide Week by Matt Bergstrom of Wurlington Bros. Press, which makes their own amazing modeling:

The world’s largest scale city model is the Panorama of New York at the Queens Museum of Art, originally built for the 1964 World’s Fair. The model encompasses all five boroughs of the city, with 830,000 little buildings made from wood and plastic on 9335 square feet. Over 100 craftsmen worked for 3 years using plat maps, aerial photos and field surveys to recreate the mini city as accurately as possible.
There are many other scale model cities around the world, but few encompass the entire urban area from the skyscrapers of downtown all the way out to the smaller dwellings of the far-flung city outskirts.

* * *
Matt Bergstrom grew up in Minneapolis but now lives in Chicago, where he runs Wurlington Press, a publisher of architectural souvenir postcards and Viewmaster 3D photos. See the wonders of Wurlington at www.wurlington-bros.com and on Tumblr at wurlington.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

PANORAMA OF NEW YORK, QUEENS MUSEUM OF ART - NEW YORK, NEW YORK

Amazing modeling sent in to American Guide Week by Matt Bergstrom of Wurlington Bros. Press, which makes their own amazing modeling:

The world’s largest scale city model is the Panorama of New York at the Queens Museum of Art, originally built for the 1964 World’s Fair. The model encompasses all five boroughs of the city, with 830,000 little buildings made from wood and plastic on 9335 square feet. Over 100 craftsmen worked for 3 years using plat maps, aerial photos and field surveys to recreate the mini city as accurately as possible.

There are many other scale model cities around the world, but few encompass the entire urban area from the skyscrapers of downtown all the way out to the smaller dwellings of the far-flung city outskirts.

* * *

Matt Bergstrom grew up in Minneapolis but now lives in Chicago, where he runs Wurlington Press, a publisher of architectural souvenir postcards and Viewmaster 3D photos. See the wonders of Wurlington at www.wurlington-bros.com and on Tumblr at wurlington.tumblr.com.

FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
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FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.
The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.
—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 
The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.
* * * 
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info

FORT TOTTEN, BAYSIDE - QUEENS, NEW YORK

FORT TOTTEN, the northeastern tip of Bayside, with a garrison of nine hundred enlisted men and officers, is headquarters of the Sixty-second Coast Artillery and of New York’s harbor eastern defense system. (Visitors admitted 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Its mobile anti-aircraft batteries are among the most modern of their kind. Built in 1862 as a military post known as Willett’s Point, it was converted into a coast artillery fort in 1901 and given its present name.

The fort is situated at the confluence of the east River, Long Island Sound, and Little Neck Bay, and commands an excellent view of the Bronx and the site of old Fort Schuyler’s at Throg’s Neck. In seasonable weather the troops parade on Friday afternoons.

—New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Fort Totten in Bayside, Queens was at one time a fort meant to protect the New York Harbor, built to withstand battle or attack. Today it is a strange combination of a maintained city park and a rare glimpse of urban decay in a city that usually has no space to allow for such emptiness. Parts of it are well kept, groomed and meant for families to picnic on lawns, fly kites or kick soccer balls. Beautifully maintained buildings built in the mid to late 1800s now house several NYPD offices and headquarters, while one falling-down chain-link fence over is a whole other world of abandonment. 

The structures in these areas are incredibly overrun with mosses, plants and in some cases whole trees growing out of the cement roof of a sprawling, dripping, once-solid military fort. The only attack this fort fights now is the natural growth taking it over, covering deep wells that once held cannons and walls that once housed ammunition. Views from the top of one structure towards another are filled with trees where once they were clear and functional. It is an amazing juxtaposition, seeing something meant for war now so silent and still and it’s truly a rare find in New York City.

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EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.

TOMORROWLAND - QUEENS, NEW YORK

In the New York City borough of Queens, the future was once on grand display. In 1939 and 1964, New York hosted the World’s Fairs at Flushing Meadows Corona Park. The events attracted millions of visitors to marvel at the epoch of innovation and industrialization. Today, the site and some structures from the 1964 exposition — dedicated to “Man’s Achievement on a Shrinking Globe in an Expanding Universe” — are still easily accessible, though rapidly showing their age.

A few buildings are still in use, such as The New York Hall of Science — a wonderful hands-on science museum with grounds decorated by rockets and quirky, retro, science-related sculptures. Walking through the park you can peek through the chain-link fence into the Queens Zoo and see a large geodesic dome that was built for the fair and now serves as an aviary. But surely the most interesting structures are the Unisphere and the sadly decaying Queens Theatre, which has fallen into disrepair, but still leaves an imposing impression. The park is a reminder of the optimism and excitement of the ’60s — when utopian futures seemed a sure and easy bet — and of how far we’ve come and how much further we have to go.

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New York City Guide LYDIA WHITE was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. Raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, she moved to Brooklyn in 2010. When not working as an interactive art director, she spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade.

Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.

GANESHA TEMPLE, QUEENS - NEW YORK

Intricately carved rooftop gopurams (towers) rise above the Ganesha Temple, soaring over the neighborhood’s detached houses, backyard kiddie pools, and Q27 bus stops.

The Hindu Temple Society of North America’s Šri Mahã Vallabha Ganapati Devasthãnam, or Ganesha Temple in Flushing, Queens (45-57 Bowne St) is one of the nation’s oldest and largest Hindu temples, claiming more than 20,000 devotees on its rolls. It conducts daily services, holds classes and events in its community center, and hosts festival celebrations throughout the year.

The Temple Society was formed in 1970, and early services were conducted in a small frame house on the site of today’s temple. A larger structure was completed in 1977 and multi-million dollar renovations in the 2000s included the installation of thousands of tons of granite carved in India by hundreds of artisans and reconstructed at the Flushing complex.

Lord Ganeša, Hinduism’s elephant-headed god, is the presiding deity of the Queens temple, but more than 40 others are worshipped there, as well. “Interior spaces of American Hindu temples are designed to be more communal as compared with the intimate spaces within traditional Hindu temples,” says Mary McGee, Associate Professor of Classical Hinduism at Columbia University.

On sunny mornings in the Ganesha Temple, adherents make their way to the shrines through the brilliant spears of light admitted by numerous skylights, but the sense of community in the main temple area penetrates even to the fluorescent-lit basement vegetarian canteen. There, kitchen staff serve up both food offerings for temple deities and delicious South Indian vegetarian dishes for cafeteria-goers. (Generally open 8:30am-9:00pm)

Visitors are welcome to the Ganesha Temple, but are expected to respectfully follow temple rules (e.g. shoes are not allowed inside).

The above photos were taken during ceremonies to infuse divine energy into temple statues after renovation. Before an admiring crowd, Minnie the elephant paraded to the temple as a manifestation of Lord Ganeša. On the building’s roof, priests poured holy baths of water, milk, and honey onto temple deities.

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Erin Chapman is co-editor of The American Guide