THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info

THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE

Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.

The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.

Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 

Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.

* * *

EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.

JOY PROM - JOHNSON CITY, TENNESSEE

"Young man, there’s no need to feel down. Young man, get yourself off the ground" — pumps from the speakers, the trumpets blare and then — "It’s fun to stay at the Y.M.C.A." — and hundreds of arms extend into the sky while red and blue lights flash from the stage.

Grace Fellowship in Johnson City, Tennessee, joined the Joy Prom movement in 2011 and are continuing to go strong along with other groups in Las Vegas, Charlotte and more. The guests of this prom range in age from knee-high to a grasshopper to older than 60 and have a range of special needs. Everyone at the event has the common goal of dancin’ their ass off and having a good time.

The night starts with the red carpet, where the attendees are announced and they enter dressed to the nines. Once at the party, you can get a horse drawn carriage ride, play Wii or air hockey, get your photo taken at the photo booth with a wacky mustache or big boa, or sit around and visit.

After dinner is served and all have eaten, the DJ starts the music. Some roll out to the dance floor while others strut — and everyone dances.

Like out of a movie, while Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” is spinning one young woman hops on the stage and does the entire choreography without missing a beat. The crowd cheers and she is not without a dance partner for the rest of the night. Couples smooch and slow dance and many are spun during a fast number. The music is hit after hit and it seems like barely a minute has passed before the lights come up and it is time to go home.

Guide Note: If you or a family member has special needs, consider finding a Joy Prom near you to attend. If you have photography skills, have mean dance moves or have experience with food service, consider volunteering at the prom. (It’s the only time you’ll see me dance in public.)

* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website, TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press.

MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION - THE CAR IN AMERICA 

I counted down the day until I was able to get my driver’s license as
a teenager. A car represented independence and the rest of my life.

My Dad had started a savings account for me when I was born and had
dutifully put in a couple bucks a week every week. We decided a
suitable amount to spend on a first car would be about $500. It
couldn’t just be any car though — this was MY first car. After an epic
back and forth with my parents, who I can now say wisely wanted me to
get a boring dependable car, I was able to get the car of my dreams or
the closest thing that $500 could get me. It was a 1979 Pontiac
special edition “Yellow Bird” Firebird with t-tops.

It was awful. The t-tops leaked in the rain. They were so heavy. I
was pulled over often because it was Iowa and not a lot happened, so
they had time to check in on young girls with crazy cars. Most days I
had to “two foot it” or constantly give the car slight gas so that it
wouldn’t die at intersections. One door had been dented by the farm
boy who sold it to me and it was very much a different shade of yellow
than the rest of the car. But — I adored it. The imperfections made it
mine.

My friend Theresa and I would go over to the East side to cruise the
loop most weekend nights. I could drive myself to school. My friend
Mike and I would jump in without opening the doors like Bo and Luke
Duke and then drive around listening to cassette tapes we bought at
the pawn shop. I loved every minute of it.

The car only lasted about six months total before it stopped running.
My uncle Hulie bought the engine off me for about the price of the car
so I could get my next car. I’ve had many cars, a couple scooters and
one motorcycle since, but I’ll probably never love a car more than
that one.

We experience life in our cars — we eat in them, sleep in them, watch
movies in them, and they become a small expression of us.

Guide Note: Photos from Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website, TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press. 

PETERS HOLLOW EGG FIGHTS - ELIZABETHTON, TENNESSEE

There’s pretty much no one we’d rather have as our guide to the folk festivals of Tennessee than our pal Tammy Mercure. She checks in for Field Assignment #4 with this great dispatch:

2013 was the 190th year of the Peters Hollow Egg Fights. (My photographs are from 2011—it rained really hard this year.) On Easter Sunday, families from around Elizabethton, TN, gather to see whose chickens laid the strongest eggs. 

The competition is divided into age divisions. Dressed in fancy Easter clothes, each group is organized in circles. The first contestant turns to the left, under supervision of one of the judges, and hits the end of their egg to the top of their neighbor’s egg.

One of the two hardboiled eggs will have its end flattened and that end is “out.” This continues, sometimes for hours, until all the eggs are out… leaving one person victorious.

Sounds like they’ve got some tough chickens there in Peters Hollow.

* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website, TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press.

TENNESSEE WATERSHED 

Photographer Jeff Rich is recording American watersheds for his WPA style project, The Watershed Project. He sends photos from the Tennessee River for AG Week Field Assignment #8: Waterways:

The French Broad is one of two major tributaries to the Tennessee River. Continuing down the system of watersheds that make up the southeastern quarter of the Mississippi River Basin, this portion of the Watershed project examines the Tennessee River Basin. A system of rivers that is for the most part controlled and ultimately harnessed by the Tennessee Valley Authority. A government organization started in 1933 that provides flood control, navigation on the rivers, economic development, and finally electric power production. The TVA operates nearly 50 dams in the Tennessee Watershed, as well as 18 power plants, and 3 nuclear plants.

The original Tennessee guidebook writes of The Tennessee Valley Authority: 

The Tennessee Valley Authority was created by Congress in 1933 to develop the Tennessee River system in the interest of navigation, flood control, and national defense, and to generate and sell surplus electricity to avert waste of water power. … In its program for flood and navigation control, for land reclamation, and for cheap electric light and power the TVA is substituting order and design for haphazard, unplanned, and unintegrated development. Through its social and educational activities it is bringing to this region a consciousness of its own rich natural and human resources. … For this, as well as its more tangible objectives, the TVA is of national importance.

Tennessee, A Guide To the State (WPA, 1939)

Guide Note:See more of The Watershed Project here.

° ° °

Jeff Rich is a photographer based in Iowa City. His work focuses on water issues ranging from recreation and sustainability to exploitation and abuse. Jeff currently teaches photography at The University of Iowa. He also produces “Eyes on the South" for The Oxford American.

Follow him on his website at jeffreyrich.com and on Twitter at @jeffreymrich.

INDUSTRY and MANUFACTURING - BRISTOL, TENNESSEE
Friend to the American Guide, Ben Collins, is the Brand and Digital Strategist at the venerable and innovative L. C. King Manufacturing Company, makers of Pointer Brand workwear. As L. C. King proudly manufactures all their products in the U. S. of A., we approached Ben about sending a dispatch on industry in Pointer’s hometown of Bristol. 
Not only did he send in the fantastic post that follows, but Pointer is generously supporting American Guide Week by offering 15% off purchases on their website with the code “americanguide”. Visit Pointer at www.pointerbrand.com and check out Ben’s post for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

These are my unequivocally unbiased views about the fair twin city of Bristol, Tennessee and Bristol, Virginia. Written by Ben Collins,
What are the principal factories in your district?
The L. C. King Manufacturing Company, of course, makers of denim and workwear since 1913 in downtown Bristol, Tennessee. There is also a pharmaceutical company which was once called King Pharmaceuticals and is now owned by Pfizer. We have a globally successful factory in Virginia called Bristol Compressors. There are a few successful metal-related factories including Tri-City Aluminum Extrusion, diamond plate manufacturing by Sturdy-Lite, and others.
What are the principal industries and industrial products?
Tourism is very important to the city with Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion annually, the Birthplace of Country Music Museum (open in 2014), the Appalachian Cultural Music Association, Bristol Motor Speedway, Antique Automobile Club of America, some of the best trout fishing east of the Mississippi.
Bristol has an attractive downtown (by far the most impressive in the region, of course) with a variety of stimulating shopping and dining opportunities. Very sophisticated mens’ haberdasheries and ladies’ clothing shops alongside burger joints, soul food, farm-to-table Wednesdays and weekly wine tastings.
As mentioned before, the manufacture of metal products appears to be a successful industry here.  Also, industrial recycling has become a sector with for-profit metal, asphalt, and even concrete recycling occurring.
We have a top notch Wellmont medical facility called Bristol Regional Medical Center, which is host to advanced medical technology and staff as well as nearby Medical Schools.  King University in Bristol recently began the development of a medical program.
Are there any commercial articles manufactured by hand?
We have again to mention the L. C. King Manufacturing Company; sellers, distributors, and exporters of fine workwear products - perhaps the finest known in the whole of the United States. Also made here are delicious candies including hand rolled peppermint by the Ratliff family. A commercially successful and also tasty snack is made on the Virginia side of town - Shearer’s potato chips.  Bristol has been known also for producing some high quality hand made stringed instruments.  Additionally, modern, high-quality custom furniture is made right in downtown at Mooska.
Are there important mines or quarries in your district? Give types.
In the district, yes, of course coal is a common mineral in the Appalachian region.  Only historically has Bristol been a resource for iron and more distantly, flint.
What are the general agricultural products and specialties of your district?
There is a thriving economy among our local agricultural community and the ever increasing hunger for fresh goods by today’s consumer. Perhaps best known for our heirloom tomatoes (their season is anticipated eagerly), the incredible array of meats is possibly the most impressive cultivated product.  You can find lamb, pork, all cuts of steak, sausage, goat, even Moroccan Spiced chorizo. On a large scale, however, corn and hay production (for feeding cattle) are the primary uses of land by farmers.
What are other important products (Ex. Logs, fur, beef, wool)
Batteries, beauty products, moonshine, beer, art.
When may interesting processes, such as fruit picking and packing, log-rolling and the like be witnessed?
A new winery has appeared east of Bristol that now has a press annually.  At the Bristol Train Station downtown, there are frequently trains coming to this important junction between the rail systems of two states. There are corn and other harvests done around September. No log-rolling these days, though during the summer we have the South Holston Lake cleanup.

Images (top to bottom, left to right):
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
Pointer factory (Nicole Poyo);
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
The Defibulators at the 2013 Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion (Photo director: Lee Jones);
Wall map (Tammy Mercure).
* * *
Ben Collins is a 20 year Bristol Resident, originally from North Florida. He’s an employee of the L. C. King Manufacturing Company and volunteer on the Bristol Main Street Board of Directors. Find L.C. King’s Pointer Brand workwear online at www.pointerbrand.com, follow them on Tumblr at pointerbrand.tumblr.com, like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pointerbrand, and follow them on Twitter (@pointerbrand) and Instagram (pointerbrand).
Zoom Info
INDUSTRY and MANUFACTURING - BRISTOL, TENNESSEE
Friend to the American Guide, Ben Collins, is the Brand and Digital Strategist at the venerable and innovative L. C. King Manufacturing Company, makers of Pointer Brand workwear. As L. C. King proudly manufactures all their products in the U. S. of A., we approached Ben about sending a dispatch on industry in Pointer’s hometown of Bristol. 
Not only did he send in the fantastic post that follows, but Pointer is generously supporting American Guide Week by offering 15% off purchases on their website with the code “americanguide”. Visit Pointer at www.pointerbrand.com and check out Ben’s post for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

These are my unequivocally unbiased views about the fair twin city of Bristol, Tennessee and Bristol, Virginia. Written by Ben Collins,
What are the principal factories in your district?
The L. C. King Manufacturing Company, of course, makers of denim and workwear since 1913 in downtown Bristol, Tennessee. There is also a pharmaceutical company which was once called King Pharmaceuticals and is now owned by Pfizer. We have a globally successful factory in Virginia called Bristol Compressors. There are a few successful metal-related factories including Tri-City Aluminum Extrusion, diamond plate manufacturing by Sturdy-Lite, and others.
What are the principal industries and industrial products?
Tourism is very important to the city with Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion annually, the Birthplace of Country Music Museum (open in 2014), the Appalachian Cultural Music Association, Bristol Motor Speedway, Antique Automobile Club of America, some of the best trout fishing east of the Mississippi.
Bristol has an attractive downtown (by far the most impressive in the region, of course) with a variety of stimulating shopping and dining opportunities. Very sophisticated mens’ haberdasheries and ladies’ clothing shops alongside burger joints, soul food, farm-to-table Wednesdays and weekly wine tastings.
As mentioned before, the manufacture of metal products appears to be a successful industry here.  Also, industrial recycling has become a sector with for-profit metal, asphalt, and even concrete recycling occurring.
We have a top notch Wellmont medical facility called Bristol Regional Medical Center, which is host to advanced medical technology and staff as well as nearby Medical Schools.  King University in Bristol recently began the development of a medical program.
Are there any commercial articles manufactured by hand?
We have again to mention the L. C. King Manufacturing Company; sellers, distributors, and exporters of fine workwear products - perhaps the finest known in the whole of the United States. Also made here are delicious candies including hand rolled peppermint by the Ratliff family. A commercially successful and also tasty snack is made on the Virginia side of town - Shearer’s potato chips.  Bristol has been known also for producing some high quality hand made stringed instruments.  Additionally, modern, high-quality custom furniture is made right in downtown at Mooska.
Are there important mines or quarries in your district? Give types.
In the district, yes, of course coal is a common mineral in the Appalachian region.  Only historically has Bristol been a resource for iron and more distantly, flint.
What are the general agricultural products and specialties of your district?
There is a thriving economy among our local agricultural community and the ever increasing hunger for fresh goods by today’s consumer. Perhaps best known for our heirloom tomatoes (their season is anticipated eagerly), the incredible array of meats is possibly the most impressive cultivated product.  You can find lamb, pork, all cuts of steak, sausage, goat, even Moroccan Spiced chorizo. On a large scale, however, corn and hay production (for feeding cattle) are the primary uses of land by farmers.
What are other important products (Ex. Logs, fur, beef, wool)
Batteries, beauty products, moonshine, beer, art.
When may interesting processes, such as fruit picking and packing, log-rolling and the like be witnessed?
A new winery has appeared east of Bristol that now has a press annually.  At the Bristol Train Station downtown, there are frequently trains coming to this important junction between the rail systems of two states. There are corn and other harvests done around September. No log-rolling these days, though during the summer we have the South Holston Lake cleanup.

Images (top to bottom, left to right):
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
Pointer factory (Nicole Poyo);
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
The Defibulators at the 2013 Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion (Photo director: Lee Jones);
Wall map (Tammy Mercure).
* * *
Ben Collins is a 20 year Bristol Resident, originally from North Florida. He’s an employee of the L. C. King Manufacturing Company and volunteer on the Bristol Main Street Board of Directors. Find L.C. King’s Pointer Brand workwear online at www.pointerbrand.com, follow them on Tumblr at pointerbrand.tumblr.com, like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pointerbrand, and follow them on Twitter (@pointerbrand) and Instagram (pointerbrand).
Zoom Info

INDUSTRY and MANUFACTURING - BRISTOL, TENNESSEE

Friend to the American Guide, Ben Collins, is the Brand and Digital Strategist at the venerable and innovative L. C. King Manufacturing Company, makers of Pointer Brand workwear. As L. C. King proudly manufactures all their products in the U. S. of A., we approached Ben about sending a dispatch on industry in Pointer’s hometown of Bristol. 

Not only did he send in the fantastic post that follows, but Pointer is generously supporting American Guide Week by offering 15% off purchases on their website with the code “americanguide”. Visit Pointer at www.pointerbrand.com and check out Ben’s post for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

These are my unequivocally unbiased views about the fair twin city of Bristol, Tennessee and Bristol, Virginia. Written by Ben Collins,

What are the principal factories in your district?

The L. C. King Manufacturing Company, of course, makers of denim and workwear since 1913 in downtown Bristol, Tennessee. There is also a pharmaceutical company which was once called King Pharmaceuticals and is now owned by Pfizer. We have a globally successful factory in Virginia called Bristol Compressors. There are a few successful metal-related factories including Tri-City Aluminum Extrusion, diamond plate manufacturing by Sturdy-Lite, and others.

What are the principal industries and industrial products?

Tourism is very important to the city with Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion annually, the Birthplace of Country Music Museum (open in 2014), the Appalachian Cultural Music Association, Bristol Motor Speedway, Antique Automobile Club of America, some of the best trout fishing east of the Mississippi.

Bristol has an attractive downtown (by far the most impressive in the region, of course) with a variety of stimulating shopping and dining opportunities. Very sophisticated mens’ haberdasheries and ladies’ clothing shops alongside burger joints, soul food, farm-to-table Wednesdays and weekly wine tastings.

As mentioned before, the manufacture of metal products appears to be a successful industry here.  Also, industrial recycling has become a sector with for-profit metal, asphalt, and even concrete recycling occurring.

We have a top notch Wellmont medical facility called Bristol Regional Medical Center, which is host to advanced medical technology and staff as well as nearby Medical Schools.  King University in Bristol recently began the development of a medical program.

Are there any commercial articles manufactured by hand?

We have again to mention the L. C. King Manufacturing Company; sellers, distributors, and exporters of fine workwear products - perhaps the finest known in the whole of the United States. Also made here are delicious candies including hand rolled peppermint by the Ratliff family. A commercially successful and also tasty snack is made on the Virginia side of town - Shearer’s potato chips.  Bristol has been known also for producing some high quality hand made stringed instruments.  Additionally, modern, high-quality custom furniture is made right in downtown at Mooska.

Are there important mines or quarries in your district? Give types.

In the district, yes, of course coal is a common mineral in the Appalachian region.  Only historically has Bristol been a resource for iron and more distantly, flint.

What are the general agricultural products and specialties of your district?

There is a thriving economy among our local agricultural community and the ever increasing hunger for fresh goods by today’s consumer. Perhaps best known for our heirloom tomatoes (their season is anticipated eagerly), the incredible array of meats is possibly the most impressive cultivated product.  You can find lamb, pork, all cuts of steak, sausage, goat, even Moroccan Spiced chorizo. On a large scale, however, corn and hay production (for feeding cattle) are the primary uses of land by farmers.

What are other important products (Ex. Logs, fur, beef, wool)

Batteries, beauty products, moonshine, beer, art.

When may interesting processes, such as fruit picking and packing, log-rolling and the like be witnessed?

A new winery has appeared east of Bristol that now has a press annually.  At the Bristol Train Station downtown, there are frequently trains coming to this important junction between the rail systems of two states. There are corn and other harvests done around September. No log-rolling these days, though during the summer we have the South Holston Lake cleanup.

Images (top to bottom, left to right):
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
Pointer factory (Nicole Poyo);
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
The Defibulators at the 2013 Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion (Photo director: Lee Jones);
Wall map (Tammy Mercure).

* * *

Ben Collins is a 20 year Bristol Resident, originally from North Florida. He’s an employee of the L. C. King Manufacturing Company and volunteer on the Bristol Main Street Board of Directors. Find L.C. King’s Pointer Brand workwear online at www.pointerbrand.com, follow them on Tumblr at pointerbrand.tumblr.com, like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pointerbrand, and follow them on Twitter (@pointerbrand) and Instagram (pointerbrand).

THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.
Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.
"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel
Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.
Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.
"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel
Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.
Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.
"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel
Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.
Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.
"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel
Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.
Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.
"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel
Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.
Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.
"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel
Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.
Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.
"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel
Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.
Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.
"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel
Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.
Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.
"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel
Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info

THE RHINESTONE REMBRANDT - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

He’s been dubbed “The Rhinestone Rembrandt” but Manuel Cuevas goes by just Manuel. His work spans the course of over five decades and with clients like The Beatles, Elton John, Little Richard and Jack White, it’s no wonder Manuel has landed a spot as one of music makers’ top custom designers. He single-handedly designed Elvis’s famous gold lame suit. He made Johnny Cash the Man in Black. He is the mastermind behind the Grateful Dead’s roses and skeletons insignia, as well as the notorious inflated lips logo of the Rolling Stones. In his shop, a personalized letter from President Ronald Reagan hangs inconspicuously in a corner where Mr. Reagan expresses his sincere appreciation for Manual’s craftsmanship.Over dinner with Manuel, I heard about his relationship with Marlon Brando, Frida, and Pablo Picasso, to name a few.

Manuel became passionate about his craft of sewing in 1945 and worked for several tailors in Los Angeles before becoming head designer and tailor for the infamous Nudie (who later became his father-in-law). With a new storefront in the heart of downtown Nashville, Manuel is bringing his ready-to-wear line to the masses. Be sure to stop in for a chance to see his flashy rhinestone suits and perhaps even meet the Legend himself.

"Record companies call me to help fabricate personalities for their artists…I do for artists what they need, not what they think they need.” — Manuel

Guide note: Manuel American Designs can be found at 800 Broadway, Nashville, TN 37203. Tel:615-321-5444

* * *

Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.

ELVIS WEEK 2013, GRACELAND - MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

Elvis is alive.

When I walked away, I heard you say

If you need me, you know what to do

I knew it then, I’d be back again.

Thirty-six years after Elvis’s death, he sang this low tune in front of Graceland while thousands held up candles at his annual vigil. Some silent, some singing along, some crying, and some hugging their neighbor.

He is one of the best musicians of all time, but it is still amazing to see the love and devotion all these years later. Standing surrounded by fans crowded in the middle of a closed street, it’s easy to see why he endures. He is still alive. 

When he was physically here, he was vibrant—his voice beautiful and versatile. We have him woefully sad, singing, “Today I stumbled from my bed while thunder crashing in my head, my pillow still wet from last night tears,” and we have his heart beating fast and “in love and all shook up” and everything in between. And in his personal life, from the peanut butter and banana sandwiches and his gleefully tacky media room to his pulsating hips and sweat drenched scarfs, he did it up.

At some point in our life, we will all lose someone desperately important to us. The sad thing about memories is the more one is accessed, the less intact it becomes. (For a fascinating read on neuroscience and more, I highly recommend “Ignorance: How it Drives Science.) The memories we cling to, because of our love for them, will change and fade more quickly than the ones we don’t actively recall.

Unlike our lost loved ones, Elvis can be resurrected in a fashion. The quality of his voice makes him sound alive and present and in the same room. He is there when we play his music. When I was five or six and listening to 8-tracks, a version of “Wooden Heart” came on. In the middle of it, he starts laughing and has to stop the song. It was a revelation to me— the song was recorded live—and it hadn’t been perfect. Elvis got the giggles. It was at that moment I fell in love with him.

I imagine most fans have a similar moment. This is how he crosses generations and different backgrounds. Strolling the streets much earlier in the day, I saw a four-year-old enraptured by George, an impersonator who sings live, competing in the championships, and an older Indian man with gold sunglasses and thick sideburns tapping his toes to every song. There were Brazilian flags and the Midwest Mafia, one of the many represented fan clubs. Across the board, everyone was smiling and enjoying the people around them—laughing, hugging, and dancing. Later, during the vigil, one could feel the love for Elvis and the memories of those who could not be there.

Guide note: Every August, fans gather at Graceland for Elvis Week, celebrating the memory of the King. The cornerstone event is a candlelight vigil, beginning on the evening of August 15th and lasting into the morning of the 16th. For more information, visit elvis.com. (And for those in the area, you haven’t missed it all this year - the Elvis 5K run is tomorrow, as are the finals of the Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist contest

* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was recently named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

 Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website, TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press.
TOMATO ART FEST - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
If you’ve ever had the urge to decorate yourself up like a giant tomato and parade around town for hours, then consider attending the yearly Tomato Art Fest in East Nashville. Started ten years ago by local artist Meg McFadden, this festival grows larger every year. Last year, there were estimates of some 35,000 people in attendance. Vendors set up local art (a lot of it tomato themed) and people roam the blocked off streets of East Nashville’s Five Points area for hours. It’s a pretty big deal—even featured in Oxford American and Southern Living. With events like the Tomato 5K, Bloody Mary contest and the ice cream trough, there’s something for everyone—even the wet burrito contest where contestants race to finish a delicious burrito from Nuvo Burrito while being hosed down with water.
Whatever your fancy, prepare to get hot (it’s August in Nashville, after all) and probably a little messy.
Guide Note:
Mark your calendars for early August each year to see the sights and sounds and tastes of the Tomato Art Fest.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
TOMATO ART FEST - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
If you’ve ever had the urge to decorate yourself up like a giant tomato and parade around town for hours, then consider attending the yearly Tomato Art Fest in East Nashville. Started ten years ago by local artist Meg McFadden, this festival grows larger every year. Last year, there were estimates of some 35,000 people in attendance. Vendors set up local art (a lot of it tomato themed) and people roam the blocked off streets of East Nashville’s Five Points area for hours. It’s a pretty big deal—even featured in Oxford American and Southern Living. With events like the Tomato 5K, Bloody Mary contest and the ice cream trough, there’s something for everyone—even the wet burrito contest where contestants race to finish a delicious burrito from Nuvo Burrito while being hosed down with water.
Whatever your fancy, prepare to get hot (it’s August in Nashville, after all) and probably a little messy.
Guide Note:
Mark your calendars for early August each year to see the sights and sounds and tastes of the Tomato Art Fest.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
TOMATO ART FEST - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
If you’ve ever had the urge to decorate yourself up like a giant tomato and parade around town for hours, then consider attending the yearly Tomato Art Fest in East Nashville. Started ten years ago by local artist Meg McFadden, this festival grows larger every year. Last year, there were estimates of some 35,000 people in attendance. Vendors set up local art (a lot of it tomato themed) and people roam the blocked off streets of East Nashville’s Five Points area for hours. It’s a pretty big deal—even featured in Oxford American and Southern Living. With events like the Tomato 5K, Bloody Mary contest and the ice cream trough, there’s something for everyone—even the wet burrito contest where contestants race to finish a delicious burrito from Nuvo Burrito while being hosed down with water.
Whatever your fancy, prepare to get hot (it’s August in Nashville, after all) and probably a little messy.
Guide Note:
Mark your calendars for early August each year to see the sights and sounds and tastes of the Tomato Art Fest.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
TOMATO ART FEST - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
If you’ve ever had the urge to decorate yourself up like a giant tomato and parade around town for hours, then consider attending the yearly Tomato Art Fest in East Nashville. Started ten years ago by local artist Meg McFadden, this festival grows larger every year. Last year, there were estimates of some 35,000 people in attendance. Vendors set up local art (a lot of it tomato themed) and people roam the blocked off streets of East Nashville’s Five Points area for hours. It’s a pretty big deal—even featured in Oxford American and Southern Living. With events like the Tomato 5K, Bloody Mary contest and the ice cream trough, there’s something for everyone—even the wet burrito contest where contestants race to finish a delicious burrito from Nuvo Burrito while being hosed down with water.
Whatever your fancy, prepare to get hot (it’s August in Nashville, after all) and probably a little messy.
Guide Note:
Mark your calendars for early August each year to see the sights and sounds and tastes of the Tomato Art Fest.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
TOMATO ART FEST - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
If you’ve ever had the urge to decorate yourself up like a giant tomato and parade around town for hours, then consider attending the yearly Tomato Art Fest in East Nashville. Started ten years ago by local artist Meg McFadden, this festival grows larger every year. Last year, there were estimates of some 35,000 people in attendance. Vendors set up local art (a lot of it tomato themed) and people roam the blocked off streets of East Nashville’s Five Points area for hours. It’s a pretty big deal—even featured in Oxford American and Southern Living. With events like the Tomato 5K, Bloody Mary contest and the ice cream trough, there’s something for everyone—even the wet burrito contest where contestants race to finish a delicious burrito from Nuvo Burrito while being hosed down with water.
Whatever your fancy, prepare to get hot (it’s August in Nashville, after all) and probably a little messy.
Guide Note:
Mark your calendars for early August each year to see the sights and sounds and tastes of the Tomato Art Fest.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
TOMATO ART FEST - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
If you’ve ever had the urge to decorate yourself up like a giant tomato and parade around town for hours, then consider attending the yearly Tomato Art Fest in East Nashville. Started ten years ago by local artist Meg McFadden, this festival grows larger every year. Last year, there were estimates of some 35,000 people in attendance. Vendors set up local art (a lot of it tomato themed) and people roam the blocked off streets of East Nashville’s Five Points area for hours. It’s a pretty big deal—even featured in Oxford American and Southern Living. With events like the Tomato 5K, Bloody Mary contest and the ice cream trough, there’s something for everyone—even the wet burrito contest where contestants race to finish a delicious burrito from Nuvo Burrito while being hosed down with water.
Whatever your fancy, prepare to get hot (it’s August in Nashville, after all) and probably a little messy.
Guide Note:
Mark your calendars for early August each year to see the sights and sounds and tastes of the Tomato Art Fest.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
TOMATO ART FEST - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
If you’ve ever had the urge to decorate yourself up like a giant tomato and parade around town for hours, then consider attending the yearly Tomato Art Fest in East Nashville. Started ten years ago by local artist Meg McFadden, this festival grows larger every year. Last year, there were estimates of some 35,000 people in attendance. Vendors set up local art (a lot of it tomato themed) and people roam the blocked off streets of East Nashville’s Five Points area for hours. It’s a pretty big deal—even featured in Oxford American and Southern Living. With events like the Tomato 5K, Bloody Mary contest and the ice cream trough, there’s something for everyone—even the wet burrito contest where contestants race to finish a delicious burrito from Nuvo Burrito while being hosed down with water.
Whatever your fancy, prepare to get hot (it’s August in Nashville, after all) and probably a little messy.
Guide Note:
Mark your calendars for early August each year to see the sights and sounds and tastes of the Tomato Art Fest.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info

TOMATO ART FEST - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

If you’ve ever had the urge to decorate yourself up like a giant tomato and parade around town for hours, then consider attending the yearly Tomato Art Fest in East Nashville. Started ten years ago by local artist Meg McFadden, this festival grows larger every year. Last year, there were estimates of some 35,000 people in attendance. Vendors set up local art (a lot of it tomato themed) and people roam the blocked off streets of East Nashville’s Five Points area for hours. It’s a pretty big deal—even featured in Oxford American and Southern Living. With events like the Tomato 5K, Bloody Mary contest and the ice cream trough, there’s something for everyone—even the wet burrito contest where contestants race to finish a delicious burrito from Nuvo Burrito while being hosed down with water.

Whatever your fancy, prepare to get hot (it’s August in Nashville, after all) and probably a little messy.

Guide Note:

  • Mark your calendars for early August each year to see the sights and sounds and tastes of the Tomato Art Fest.

* * *

Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.

IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.
Unless you like to sing.
Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.
Unless you like to sing.
Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.
Unless you like to sing.
Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.
Unless you like to sing.
Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.
Unless you like to sing.
Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.
Unless you like to sing.
Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.
Unless you like to sing.
Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.
Unless you like to sing.
Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.
Unless you like to sing.
Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info

IT’S ALWAYS CHRISTMAS AT SANTA’S PUB - NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 

When you pass by Santa’s Pub off Highway 81 and Brandsford Avenue in Nashville, you might think it’s just an average seedy motorcycle bar. But I’ve yet to see a motorcycle bar with a Santa Claus riding a Harley painted on the outside. This double wide trailer—or maybe even triple wide, if you believe the bar bathroom graffiti—serves up some of the coldest beer in town. And if that’s not exactly true, they still have beer which is why I like to frequent this dive. The price list goes from $2.00 to $4.00 which is perfect for a drinker’s budget. Beer, wine coolers and a couple special daiquiris are all you’re going to get at Santa’s.

Unless you like to sing.

Santa’s is also one of the best karaoke bars in town. Nashville is known as Music City, so there are likely to be some very talented singers in the audience each night. Santa himself (yes, he looks like ol’ Saint Nick) entertains patrons on a regular basis. Don’t look for a song list book or a strategic system for this karaoke program. Simply write your name and song on a post-it and hand it to the guy with the computer. The best part: you can do this until 3am every night of the week.

* * *

Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.