BONAVENTURE CEMETERY - SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Cloaked somberly in gray moss, the branches of old oaks meet like cathedral arches above the drives and weathered tombstones. Even in spring, when crimson azaleas and white and pink camellias lend the cemetery the beauty of a garden, it is the gray monotone of trailing moss and old stone that most truly characterizes Bonaventure. Brown fallen leaves and here and there a bright petal drift past on the slow Wilmington River.
About 1760, Colonel John Mulryne, an English gentleman, moved from Charleston, South Carolina, to this site, built a house of English brick facing the river, and cultivated a beautiful garden. It is told that when his only child, Mary, married Josiah Tattnall of Charleston, avenues of trees were planted to honor her in the form of the initials M and T. Another story recounts that in later years a fire was discovered one evening as the Tattnalls were entertaining guests for dinner. Seeing that the flames were beyond control, the imperturbable host had the table removed to the garden where, in the light of the destroying flames, he regaled his nervous guests with witty conversation as his home was destroyed. …
The oldest graves are those of the Tattnall family and of the French soldiers who fell in an attempt to take Savannah from the British during the Revolution. 
STRANGER’S TOMB, at the entrance, was erected in memory of William Gaston, who was widely known for his hospitality. Because of his kindness to strangers, the people of Savannah honored him by building in his memory a receiving vault, where the body of any stranger who died in Savannah could be placed temporarily.
—Georgia, A Guide To Its Towns and Countryside (WPA, 1940)

* * *
It was a college summer session in Paris and the South of France that cemented Shevaun Williams' love affair with travel and the camera. She now calls the renovated, 4500 square foot Moss Brewing Company built in 1906 in Norman, Oklahoma her home studio and gallery. After over 30 years as a professional photographer, she is still inspired, driven and in love with all photography…film and digital…35mm to 4x5…and she can still rock a back flip off the one meter springboard. Find her website at www.shevaunwilliams.com and follow her work on instagram.com/shevyvision and shevyvision.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
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BONAVENTURE CEMETERY - SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Cloaked somberly in gray moss, the branches of old oaks meet like cathedral arches above the drives and weathered tombstones. Even in spring, when crimson azaleas and white and pink camellias lend the cemetery the beauty of a garden, it is the gray monotone of trailing moss and old stone that most truly characterizes Bonaventure. Brown fallen leaves and here and there a bright petal drift past on the slow Wilmington River.
About 1760, Colonel John Mulryne, an English gentleman, moved from Charleston, South Carolina, to this site, built a house of English brick facing the river, and cultivated a beautiful garden. It is told that when his only child, Mary, married Josiah Tattnall of Charleston, avenues of trees were planted to honor her in the form of the initials M and T. Another story recounts that in later years a fire was discovered one evening as the Tattnalls were entertaining guests for dinner. Seeing that the flames were beyond control, the imperturbable host had the table removed to the garden where, in the light of the destroying flames, he regaled his nervous guests with witty conversation as his home was destroyed. …
The oldest graves are those of the Tattnall family and of the French soldiers who fell in an attempt to take Savannah from the British during the Revolution. 
STRANGER’S TOMB, at the entrance, was erected in memory of William Gaston, who was widely known for his hospitality. Because of his kindness to strangers, the people of Savannah honored him by building in his memory a receiving vault, where the body of any stranger who died in Savannah could be placed temporarily.
—Georgia, A Guide To Its Towns and Countryside (WPA, 1940)

* * *
It was a college summer session in Paris and the South of France that cemented Shevaun Williams' love affair with travel and the camera. She now calls the renovated, 4500 square foot Moss Brewing Company built in 1906 in Norman, Oklahoma her home studio and gallery. After over 30 years as a professional photographer, she is still inspired, driven and in love with all photography…film and digital…35mm to 4x5…and she can still rock a back flip off the one meter springboard. Find her website at www.shevaunwilliams.com and follow her work on instagram.com/shevyvision and shevyvision.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
BONAVENTURE CEMETERY - SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Cloaked somberly in gray moss, the branches of old oaks meet like cathedral arches above the drives and weathered tombstones. Even in spring, when crimson azaleas and white and pink camellias lend the cemetery the beauty of a garden, it is the gray monotone of trailing moss and old stone that most truly characterizes Bonaventure. Brown fallen leaves and here and there a bright petal drift past on the slow Wilmington River.
About 1760, Colonel John Mulryne, an English gentleman, moved from Charleston, South Carolina, to this site, built a house of English brick facing the river, and cultivated a beautiful garden. It is told that when his only child, Mary, married Josiah Tattnall of Charleston, avenues of trees were planted to honor her in the form of the initials M and T. Another story recounts that in later years a fire was discovered one evening as the Tattnalls were entertaining guests for dinner. Seeing that the flames were beyond control, the imperturbable host had the table removed to the garden where, in the light of the destroying flames, he regaled his nervous guests with witty conversation as his home was destroyed. …
The oldest graves are those of the Tattnall family and of the French soldiers who fell in an attempt to take Savannah from the British during the Revolution. 
STRANGER’S TOMB, at the entrance, was erected in memory of William Gaston, who was widely known for his hospitality. Because of his kindness to strangers, the people of Savannah honored him by building in his memory a receiving vault, where the body of any stranger who died in Savannah could be placed temporarily.
—Georgia, A Guide To Its Towns and Countryside (WPA, 1940)

* * *
It was a college summer session in Paris and the South of France that cemented Shevaun Williams' love affair with travel and the camera. She now calls the renovated, 4500 square foot Moss Brewing Company built in 1906 in Norman, Oklahoma her home studio and gallery. After over 30 years as a professional photographer, she is still inspired, driven and in love with all photography…film and digital…35mm to 4x5…and she can still rock a back flip off the one meter springboard. Find her website at www.shevaunwilliams.com and follow her work on instagram.com/shevyvision and shevyvision.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
BONAVENTURE CEMETERY - SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Cloaked somberly in gray moss, the branches of old oaks meet like cathedral arches above the drives and weathered tombstones. Even in spring, when crimson azaleas and white and pink camellias lend the cemetery the beauty of a garden, it is the gray monotone of trailing moss and old stone that most truly characterizes Bonaventure. Brown fallen leaves and here and there a bright petal drift past on the slow Wilmington River.
About 1760, Colonel John Mulryne, an English gentleman, moved from Charleston, South Carolina, to this site, built a house of English brick facing the river, and cultivated a beautiful garden. It is told that when his only child, Mary, married Josiah Tattnall of Charleston, avenues of trees were planted to honor her in the form of the initials M and T. Another story recounts that in later years a fire was discovered one evening as the Tattnalls were entertaining guests for dinner. Seeing that the flames were beyond control, the imperturbable host had the table removed to the garden where, in the light of the destroying flames, he regaled his nervous guests with witty conversation as his home was destroyed. …
The oldest graves are those of the Tattnall family and of the French soldiers who fell in an attempt to take Savannah from the British during the Revolution. 
STRANGER’S TOMB, at the entrance, was erected in memory of William Gaston, who was widely known for his hospitality. Because of his kindness to strangers, the people of Savannah honored him by building in his memory a receiving vault, where the body of any stranger who died in Savannah could be placed temporarily.
—Georgia, A Guide To Its Towns and Countryside (WPA, 1940)

* * *
It was a college summer session in Paris and the South of France that cemented Shevaun Williams' love affair with travel and the camera. She now calls the renovated, 4500 square foot Moss Brewing Company built in 1906 in Norman, Oklahoma her home studio and gallery. After over 30 years as a professional photographer, she is still inspired, driven and in love with all photography…film and digital…35mm to 4x5…and she can still rock a back flip off the one meter springboard. Find her website at www.shevaunwilliams.com and follow her work on instagram.com/shevyvision and shevyvision.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
BONAVENTURE CEMETERY - SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Cloaked somberly in gray moss, the branches of old oaks meet like cathedral arches above the drives and weathered tombstones. Even in spring, when crimson azaleas and white and pink camellias lend the cemetery the beauty of a garden, it is the gray monotone of trailing moss and old stone that most truly characterizes Bonaventure. Brown fallen leaves and here and there a bright petal drift past on the slow Wilmington River.
About 1760, Colonel John Mulryne, an English gentleman, moved from Charleston, South Carolina, to this site, built a house of English brick facing the river, and cultivated a beautiful garden. It is told that when his only child, Mary, married Josiah Tattnall of Charleston, avenues of trees were planted to honor her in the form of the initials M and T. Another story recounts that in later years a fire was discovered one evening as the Tattnalls were entertaining guests for dinner. Seeing that the flames were beyond control, the imperturbable host had the table removed to the garden where, in the light of the destroying flames, he regaled his nervous guests with witty conversation as his home was destroyed. …
The oldest graves are those of the Tattnall family and of the French soldiers who fell in an attempt to take Savannah from the British during the Revolution. 
STRANGER’S TOMB, at the entrance, was erected in memory of William Gaston, who was widely known for his hospitality. Because of his kindness to strangers, the people of Savannah honored him by building in his memory a receiving vault, where the body of any stranger who died in Savannah could be placed temporarily.
—Georgia, A Guide To Its Towns and Countryside (WPA, 1940)

* * *
It was a college summer session in Paris and the South of France that cemented Shevaun Williams' love affair with travel and the camera. She now calls the renovated, 4500 square foot Moss Brewing Company built in 1906 in Norman, Oklahoma her home studio and gallery. After over 30 years as a professional photographer, she is still inspired, driven and in love with all photography…film and digital…35mm to 4x5…and she can still rock a back flip off the one meter springboard. Find her website at www.shevaunwilliams.com and follow her work on instagram.com/shevyvision and shevyvision.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
BONAVENTURE CEMETERY - SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Cloaked somberly in gray moss, the branches of old oaks meet like cathedral arches above the drives and weathered tombstones. Even in spring, when crimson azaleas and white and pink camellias lend the cemetery the beauty of a garden, it is the gray monotone of trailing moss and old stone that most truly characterizes Bonaventure. Brown fallen leaves and here and there a bright petal drift past on the slow Wilmington River.
About 1760, Colonel John Mulryne, an English gentleman, moved from Charleston, South Carolina, to this site, built a house of English brick facing the river, and cultivated a beautiful garden. It is told that when his only child, Mary, married Josiah Tattnall of Charleston, avenues of trees were planted to honor her in the form of the initials M and T. Another story recounts that in later years a fire was discovered one evening as the Tattnalls were entertaining guests for dinner. Seeing that the flames were beyond control, the imperturbable host had the table removed to the garden where, in the light of the destroying flames, he regaled his nervous guests with witty conversation as his home was destroyed. …
The oldest graves are those of the Tattnall family and of the French soldiers who fell in an attempt to take Savannah from the British during the Revolution. 
STRANGER’S TOMB, at the entrance, was erected in memory of William Gaston, who was widely known for his hospitality. Because of his kindness to strangers, the people of Savannah honored him by building in his memory a receiving vault, where the body of any stranger who died in Savannah could be placed temporarily.
—Georgia, A Guide To Its Towns and Countryside (WPA, 1940)

* * *
It was a college summer session in Paris and the South of France that cemented Shevaun Williams' love affair with travel and the camera. She now calls the renovated, 4500 square foot Moss Brewing Company built in 1906 in Norman, Oklahoma her home studio and gallery. After over 30 years as a professional photographer, she is still inspired, driven and in love with all photography…film and digital…35mm to 4x5…and she can still rock a back flip off the one meter springboard. Find her website at www.shevaunwilliams.com and follow her work on instagram.com/shevyvision and shevyvision.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
BONAVENTURE CEMETERY - SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Cloaked somberly in gray moss, the branches of old oaks meet like cathedral arches above the drives and weathered tombstones. Even in spring, when crimson azaleas and white and pink camellias lend the cemetery the beauty of a garden, it is the gray monotone of trailing moss and old stone that most truly characterizes Bonaventure. Brown fallen leaves and here and there a bright petal drift past on the slow Wilmington River.
About 1760, Colonel John Mulryne, an English gentleman, moved from Charleston, South Carolina, to this site, built a house of English brick facing the river, and cultivated a beautiful garden. It is told that when his only child, Mary, married Josiah Tattnall of Charleston, avenues of trees were planted to honor her in the form of the initials M and T. Another story recounts that in later years a fire was discovered one evening as the Tattnalls were entertaining guests for dinner. Seeing that the flames were beyond control, the imperturbable host had the table removed to the garden where, in the light of the destroying flames, he regaled his nervous guests with witty conversation as his home was destroyed. …
The oldest graves are those of the Tattnall family and of the French soldiers who fell in an attempt to take Savannah from the British during the Revolution. 
STRANGER’S TOMB, at the entrance, was erected in memory of William Gaston, who was widely known for his hospitality. Because of his kindness to strangers, the people of Savannah honored him by building in his memory a receiving vault, where the body of any stranger who died in Savannah could be placed temporarily.
—Georgia, A Guide To Its Towns and Countryside (WPA, 1940)

* * *
It was a college summer session in Paris and the South of France that cemented Shevaun Williams' love affair with travel and the camera. She now calls the renovated, 4500 square foot Moss Brewing Company built in 1906 in Norman, Oklahoma her home studio and gallery. After over 30 years as a professional photographer, she is still inspired, driven and in love with all photography…film and digital…35mm to 4x5…and she can still rock a back flip off the one meter springboard. Find her website at www.shevaunwilliams.com and follow her work on instagram.com/shevyvision and shevyvision.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info

BONAVENTURE CEMETERY - SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Cloaked somberly in gray moss, the branches of old oaks meet like cathedral arches above the drives and weathered tombstones. Even in spring, when crimson azaleas and white and pink camellias lend the cemetery the beauty of a garden, it is the gray monotone of trailing moss and old stone that most truly characterizes Bonaventure. Brown fallen leaves and here and there a bright petal drift past on the slow Wilmington River.

About 1760, Colonel John Mulryne, an English gentleman, moved from Charleston, South Carolina, to this site, built a house of English brick facing the river, and cultivated a beautiful garden. It is told that when his only child, Mary, married Josiah Tattnall of Charleston, avenues of trees were planted to honor her in the form of the initials M and T. Another story recounts that in later years a fire was discovered one evening as the Tattnalls were entertaining guests for dinner. Seeing that the flames were beyond control, the imperturbable host had the table removed to the garden where, in the light of the destroying flames, he regaled his nervous guests with witty conversation as his home was destroyed. …

The oldest graves are those of the Tattnall family and of the French soldiers who fell in an attempt to take Savannah from the British during the Revolution. 

STRANGER’S TOMB, at the entrance, was erected in memory of William Gaston, who was widely known for his hospitality. Because of his kindness to strangers, the people of Savannah honored him by building in his memory a receiving vault, where the body of any stranger who died in Savannah could be placed temporarily.

Georgia, A Guide To Its Towns and Countryside (WPA, 1940)

* * *

It was a college summer session in Paris and the South of France that cemented Shevaun Williams' love affair with travel and the camera. She now calls the renovated, 4500 square foot Moss Brewing Company built in 1906 in Norman, Oklahoma her home studio and gallery. After over 30 years as a professional photographer, she is still inspired, driven and in love with all photography…film and digital…35mm to 4x5…and she can still rock a back flip off the one meter springboard. Find her website at www.shevaunwilliams.com and follow her work on instagram.com/shevyvision and shevyvision.tumblr.com.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

CUSTOM HOUSE WHARF – PORTLAND, MAINE

Portland, Maine is better than ever. I suppose there might be some dyed-in-the-wool native Mainers who would disagree and harken back to some memory they’re holding onto from yesteryear, but in my lifetime Portland has never looked so good. The abundance of culture is astounding—music, art, food… It’s more prevalent than years past and the quality is on par with (if not actually better than) much larger cities. But as much as I love getting back to my native state and seeing what newness Portland has to offer, I also appreciate Portland for how much it hasn’t changed.

As quickly as Portland continues to evolve, The Custom House Wharf is the best example of what hasn’t budged one bit. This has always been a commercial, working waterfront. Ferryboats going out, ferryboats coming in. Trawlers going out, trawlers coming in. Lobster boats going out, lobster boats coming in.It doesn’t stop. There is constant activity along the waterline, but somehow time stands still on Custom House Wharf. Every building looks as though it’s been there forever and might possibly fall down tomorrow.

Whenever I can I like to stroll the wharf and breathe in the salt water and the slightly foul stench of bait and whatever sea life is being processed behind closed doors. It is a spot unlike any other in town. Most of downtown Portland has been very well preserved, and the brick buildings appear as they always have—and they look to stand another century or more—but here on the wharf you wonder how it’s lasted this long without a renovation. The wooden façades are grey and raw, stripped bare by the constant, salty sea breeze that renders everything to its greyest and brownest core. There are hints of yellow where newer pieces of plywood have been used as patchwork, slowly mellowing with the weather.

There are a few places to poke your head into—one of the best fish markets in town, and a diner, as well as a comedy club. But most of the buildings are private and they are as nondescript as the barren wood they are constructed from. There is a rough and ugly beauty to this piece of Portland that’s a reminder of what the city was literally and figuratively built on. It’s living history, and it continues to be a fantastic contrast to all the things that are changing everywhere else in town.

* * *

Guide to the Northeast Brett Klein lives in Connecticut and works in New York, but prefers small town life and his home state of Maine. Any chance to get rural is a mental vacation. Follow Klein on Tumblr at The Coast is Clear. His curatorial collection of Americana, rural life, other artists and ephemera can be seen on Tumblr at Tons of Land.

INDIANA

Here the prairie starts its westward sweep…

Indiana, A Guide To the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

…The “This Way” sign is located right outside the town of Maukport, Indiana.  Maukport is a small town (population 81) only a stone’s throw from the Ohio River.  I spoke at length with the owner of the Riverbottom Inn, a local dive, and she said most of the people in the town were forced out when it flooded around a decade ago.  

…The truck on the road is near Starlight, Indiana, my mother’s hometown. Starlight is built on a network of hills and the only way to get to any part of the town is to drive up them. 

…The woman sitting in the pew is attending a 8:00am service at St. John the Baptist Church in Starlight, Indiana.

…”Jack’s” is a pool hall located in New Albany, Indiana. It’s one of the only bars left in town where you can still smoke.  Believe me when I say that people that play there are serious about pool.

…The woman reading the paper is sitting in a public library in Corydon, Indiana.

…The man in the stables is a traveling blacksmith.  He had arrived to reattach a horse shoe to a race horse on a farm in Borden, Indiana.

…The sprinkler in the yard was in a small suburb of Salem Indiana, just before dusk. 

* * *

Guide to the Midwest Tom Hoying is a documentary photographer and photo illustrator living and working in Columbus, OH.  He spends his free time traveling across the midwest working on long term documentary photo projects. You can view more of his work on his website, tomhoying.com and his tumblr, tomhoying.tumblr.com.

SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 
Boot Bar lettering.
Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
Dodge lettering. 
Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
King of Jeans lettering.
A Man’s Image lettering. 
Melino’s lettering. 
Texas Weiners lettering.
Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
DEERE lettering. 
* * *
Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.
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SOUTH PHILLY CALLIGRAPHY - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

  1. Boot Bar lettering.
  2. Spain, Polka, Alma and assorted South Philly tag lettering. 
  3. Dodge lettering. 
  4. Pat’s King of Steaks lettering. 
  5. King of Jeans lettering.
  6. A Man’s Image lettering. 
  7. Melino’s lettering. 
  8. Texas Weiners lettering.
  9. Dolphin Tavern Billiards and Broad St. Cleaners lettering.
  10. DEERE lettering. 

* * *

Northeast Regional Guide LEAH FRANCES was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. She spends her days in the production departments of magazines and her evenings studying at the International Center of Photography. Weekends you will find her in the back of a Greyhound bus, map in hand. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com.

MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
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MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
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MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info
MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.
—Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.
Zoom Info

MIDWAY, KENTUCKY

MIDWAY, 83.7 m. (830 alt., 808 pop.), with its tree-shaded streets, old houses, and well-kept lawns and flower gardens, gives an impression of gracious living. The name refers to General Francisco’s log house built here in 1795, midway between Lexington and Frankfort. Chief Justice John Marshall referred to Midway as “the asparagus bed of the garden spot of Kentucky,” and the sobriquet has survived. According to tradition this place furnished local color for Mary J. Holmes’ Tempest and Sunshine.

Kentucky, A Guide To the Bluegrass State (WPA, 1939)

* * *

Bob Tankersley grew up hating country music in the Country Music capital of the world… Nashville, TN. No longer a hater, Bob now uses his musical ear and guitar pick to dabble in kindred genres like bluegrass. Bob resides in the beautiful Bluegrass State with his bride and business partner who shares his wanderlust for backroads. Follow Bob on Tumblr at thebeautifulsomething.tumblr.com, find him on Instagram at @bobtank, and see more of his work on Wordpress at seeingthebeautifulsomething.wordpress.com.

SMALL TOWN DINERS - INDIANA

Meals served in smartly fronted little restaurants and lunch stands retain the unmistakable tang of country cooking. 

Indiana: A Guide to the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

Small town diners in Indiana: stop in a good one and you will likely meet some incredible people; owners who love to cook and are adept at running a business on a shoestring. Small town cafes are personal spaces that reflect the ups and downs of their surrounding community.  They provide a central meeting spot and a sociable place to eat alone.

How to rate a café in the Hoosier state? If hand-breaded tenderloin and homemade pie are on the menu, your order will not disappoint.

Guide Notes:

—locations—

  1. Mary Ann Rubio, Family Café, Knox, IN
  2. The Grill, LaCrosse, IN
  3. Happy Days Café, Wakarusa, IN
  4. White House Hamburgers, Logansport, IN
  5. Hamlet Café, Hamlet, IN
  6. Crockpot Café, Walkerton, IN
  7. Teel’s Family Restaurant, Mentone, IN
  8. Northside Diner, Chesterton, IN
  9. The Nook, Columbia City, IN
  10. Woodland Inn, Woodland, IN

* * *

Kay Westhues is a photographer based in South Bend, IN. Through her work she aims to describe the vitality and complexity of places and people whose lives are often overlooked and unexamined. She is inspired by the ways rural tradition and history are interpreted and transformed in the present day. You can see more of her work at kaywesthues.com or follow her latest project on tumblr (kwesthues.tumblr.com).

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

Well, shucks - guardian Travel named The American Guide a “best independent travel magazine.” We’re honored to be included on their illustrious list.

This is, of course, completely due to all our Guides and contributors. They make it a pleasure to open our dashboard every morning and we hope you’re following every one of their own blogs, sites and projects

This also seems like an opportunity to thank Tumblr’s staff. We are a strange beast - a blend of travel, photography, history and documentary very different than the other publications on the Guardian’s list. We’re able to do what we do in large part because of some awesome folks at Tumblr and the community-driven platform they produce.

A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
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A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info

A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.

With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.

This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”

Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *

Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info

THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI

Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.

Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.

Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)

What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.

Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.

* * *

Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.

'ELYSIAN FIELDS' - WISCONSIN

Some of these Wisconsin vehicles outlasted the weather and ravages of time to become daily drivers. Others found their Elysian Fields, which is where heroes went after their deaths in Greek mythology.

A broke-down automobile can sometimes have the look of a fallen hero. 

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.