SHARED SPACE - THE AMERICAN CITY

Standing at the foot of the deep sunless canyon of lower Broadway is BOWLING GREEN, probably the city’s oldest public park. … In 1638-47 this oval spot was part of the hog and cattle market of Marcktveldt. Later, it served as a parade ground for the Dutch militia. The English fenced off the plot and in 1732 leased it to three citizens for use as a private bowling ground. The rent was set at one peppercorn a year. During the Revolution, the royal crowns ornamenting the fence pickets disappeared.

***

The “golden keys” to Gramercy Park, symbol of the exclusiveness guaranteed by a real-estate operator about a century ago, are still required to open the gate to New York’s most important privately owned park. A forbidding eight-foot iron fence encloses this oblong tract two blocks square that is “forever” locked to the public. … Residents in near-by streets who have been approved by the trustees are given keys for annual fees. All others must be satisfied with a glimpse through the gate.

New York City Guide (WPA, 1939)

Ladies and gents, we’re featuring these illustrations of NYC from the 1939 WPA guide to the city because A) we love them and B) our friends over at Urban Omnibus are thinking about shared space in the American urban environment. In fact, they’re running a writing competition all about it…

What do you hold in common with your fellow citizens, the strangers with whom you share your city?

What kinds of urban space, property, or merchandise do you choose not to own yet feel you have the right to use?

How does the city affect your perceptions of the distinctions between goods and services, private and public, material and digital, proprietary and common, ownership and access?

UO is in the midst of their third annual writing competition—this year on the topic of common ownership, private property, and the sharing economy—and we thought some of our American Guide readers and contributors might be interested.

One first-prize essay will receive an award of $500. Up to two second-place winners will receive prizes of $250 each. Winning submissions will be published on Urban Omnibus and in a booklet printed by the very cool McNally Jackson Books. The booklet will be featured in the Architecture section of McNally Jackson in Manhattan for the summer, and winners will be invited to read their submissions at an event at the bookstore in July.

The jury includes plenty of great thinkers about urban space and architecture: Rosalie Genevro, Lucy Ives, Suketu Mehta, Cassim Shepard, Varick Shute, and Caitlin Zaloom. 

For submission instructions and more information, visit urbanomnibus.net/commonshares. The deadline is 11:59pm at Monday, May 12, so get on this!

P.S. If anybody wants to respond to this topic via photography or illustration, send ‘em our way and maybe we can do a post or two of our own when Urban Omnibus announces their winner.

CONTEMPORARY NORTH DAKOTA

North Dakotan Dan Koeck takes a photographic record of the people of the Northern Prairie State for Field Assignment #7: Ethnography & Demographics:

A State of unbounded plains and hills and Badlands—elbowroom. Superb sunsets. High winds and tumbleweed. Farms and plows and sweeping fields. Gophers flashing across the road. Little towns crowded on Saturday night, and busy cities shipping out the products of North Dakota and supply the needs of the producers. Sudden blinding, isolating blizzards, and soft, fragrant spring days with tiny sprouts of grain peering greenly through the topsoil. Pasque flower and cactus, flame lily, and fields of yellow mustard. The sad, slow wail of a coyote on the still prairie. People—Norwegians, Germans, Russians, Poles, Czechs, Icelanders, but all Americans. Square dances in barn lofts, and college “proms” with corsages and grand marches. Teachers building fires with numbed hands in stoves of icy one-room schools. Men in unaccustomed “best clothes” sitting in majestic legislative halls of a skyscraper statehouse. Political fires, sometimes smoldering, sometimes flaring, always burning.

Endless facets are apparent in the temper and tenor of life, thought, and action of the people of this State, still a new people, pioneers—

North Dakota: A Guide to the Northern Prairie State (WPA, 1938)

* * *

Dan Koeck, a native Minnesotan, moved to North Dakota in 1984 to take a job photographing for a newspaper. He fell in love with the state and has photographed its cultural landscape for a variety of organizations and clients ever since. Follow at dankoeck.com and on Tumblr at blog.dankoeck.com.

INSECTS OF SOUTHWEST COLORADO 

In all sections of the State are bugs and beetles, varying in size from the two-inch dark-shelled cockroach to the small round ladybird decked in her bright colors.  (…) 

Butterflies, moths, and flies of many colors and varieties occur throughout the State.  (…)  Lightning bugs hover over the prairie meadows, and Colorado’s dry sunny climate and abundance of flowers find favor with more than seven hundred kinds of bees.

—Colorado: A Guide to the Highest State (WPA, 1941)

A bug-eye level look at Colorado State insects for Field Assignment #2 - Flora and Fauna from Amadee Ricketts, your Guide to the West:

Southwest Colorado is a funny mix of high desert and mountains. With milder winters and fewer violent storms than the Front Range (east of the Rockies), it is home to an incredible variety of insects and spiders, though most of them aren’t as showy as these.

In summertime, bees and butterflies are everywhere, drawn to wildflowers and waterAnts and ant mimics, dragonflies, weevils, and sneaky little mosquitoes turn up where you least expect them. Flies and spiders stay around even after the first frost. 

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

TENNESSEE WATERSHED 

Photographer Jeff Rich is recording American watersheds for his WPA style project, The Watershed Project. He sends photos from the Tennessee River for AG Week Field Assignment #8: Waterways:

The French Broad is one of two major tributaries to the Tennessee River. Continuing down the system of watersheds that make up the southeastern quarter of the Mississippi River Basin, this portion of the Watershed project examines the Tennessee River Basin. A system of rivers that is for the most part controlled and ultimately harnessed by the Tennessee Valley Authority. A government organization started in 1933 that provides flood control, navigation on the rivers, economic development, and finally electric power production. The TVA operates nearly 50 dams in the Tennessee Watershed, as well as 18 power plants, and 3 nuclear plants.

The original Tennessee guidebook writes of The Tennessee Valley Authority: 

The Tennessee Valley Authority was created by Congress in 1933 to develop the Tennessee River system in the interest of navigation, flood control, and national defense, and to generate and sell surplus electricity to avert waste of water power. … In its program for flood and navigation control, for land reclamation, and for cheap electric light and power the TVA is substituting order and design for haphazard, unplanned, and unintegrated development. Through its social and educational activities it is bringing to this region a consciousness of its own rich natural and human resources. … For this, as well as its more tangible objectives, the TVA is of national importance.

Tennessee, A Guide To the State (WPA, 1939)

Guide Note:See more of The Watershed Project here.

° ° °

Jeff Rich is a photographer based in Iowa City. His work focuses on water issues ranging from recreation and sustainability to exploitation and abuse. Jeff currently teaches photography at The University of Iowa. He also produces “Eyes on the South" for The Oxford American.

Follow him on his website at jeffreyrich.com and on Twitter at @jeffreymrich.

GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 


The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here. 
° ° °


Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 
Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).
Zoom Info
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 


The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here. 
° ° °


Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 
Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).
Zoom Info
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 


The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here. 
° ° °


Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 
Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).
Zoom Info
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 


The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here. 
° ° °


Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 
Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).
Zoom Info
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 


The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here. 
° ° °


Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 
Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).
Zoom Info
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 


The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here. 
° ° °


Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 
Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).
Zoom Info
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 


The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here. 
° ° °


Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 
Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).
Zoom Info
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 


The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here. 
° ° °


Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 
Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).
Zoom Info
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 


The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.
—Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here. 
° ° °


Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 
Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).
Zoom Info

GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK - ARIZONA 

The dark pines of the Kaibob National Forest conceal the Grand Canyon of the Colorado till the rim is reached. There, spread out for seemingly endless miles, is an ocean of color. From misty blue depths rise gigantic islands of crimson sandstone. Their undulating bands of red and purple grow softer in color and outline towards the horizon, where a single firm stroke seems to separate the rosy depths from the sky above. Its immensity is awful; the boldness of its contours overwhelming; its immobility terrifying.

Arizona, The Grand Canyon State: A State Guide (WPA, 1940)

Mary Lewey packed her AG Week Field Manual in a pack on her trusted mule for a ride through the Grand Canyon. This is part one of her photo-log for Field Assignment #5: National Parks, Monuments & Landmarks. See part two here

° ° °

Mary Lewey grew up on a small farm in Godfrey, Illinois, daydreaming of other places to be and cities to see. After high school, she headed south for college, spending her early 20s in the magical city of St. Augustine, Florida. Friendship and the need for a change brought her to Somerville, Massachusetts, where she now resides. 

Follow on Tumblr at dignifiedconversation and on Twitter (@marylewey).

McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.
—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 
Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.
At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °
Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 
Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 
Zoom Info
McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.
—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 
Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.
At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °
Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 
Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 
Zoom Info
McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.
—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 
Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.
At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °
Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 
Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 
Zoom Info
McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.
—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 
Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.
At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °
Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 
Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 
Zoom Info
McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.
—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 
Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.
At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °
Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 
Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 
Zoom Info
McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.
—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 
Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.
At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °
Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 
Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 
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McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.
—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 
Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.
At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °
Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 
Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 
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McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.
—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 
Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.
At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °
Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 
Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 
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McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.
—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 
Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.
At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °
Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 
Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 
Zoom Info

McCOY, WASHINGTON

Swinging southeast, State 3 winds around the slopes of low hills that are cultivated to their very summits. On every hand is evidence of the stability of agriculture in this region: except for an occasional splash of yellow-blooming mustard, the fields are almost free of weeds; houses, barns, and outbuildings are neat and substantial; fence posts are erect and securely set and the strands of barbed wire are taut; new automobiles and trucks are seen very frequently.

—Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State (WPA, 1941)

The McCoy, Washington, scene as described by Northwesterner Brendan O’Donnell for #AmericanGuideWeek Field Assignment #10: Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

McCoy, Washington, is a spot on Highway 271 (formerly State 3) between Oakesdale and Rosalia in Whitman County. The hills are still cultivated to their very summits, but the machine agriculture that dominates the Palouse has all but obviated the need for barns, outbuildings, fence posts, and barbed wire. 

Looming over the hills on Naff Ridge, just to the south of 271, are the swirling blades and austere white towers of the Palouse Hills Wind Project. The wind is converted into electricity that’s sold elsewhere; the local grid is still mostly powered by hydro-power from the Snake and Columbia rivers.

At McCoy, the tall, boxy, aluminum-clad 1940’s-era grain elevator stands within sight of the new McCoy Grain Terminal. Grain from all over the Palouse is trucked to the Terminal, where it is then dumped into 110-car unit grain trains destined for Portland, Longview, Kalama, Tacoma, and other Northwest ports. There, the crop is transfered to the holds of ships bound for Asia. Their work thus exported, the locals stock their pantries with food grown elsewhere down at Crossett’s Food Market in Oakesdale.

° ° °

Brendan O’Donnell grew up in New York City and Maine, and along the way has called many places home. He’s settled in north Idaho on the eastern edge of the Palouse with his wife and children on a small farm. The Pacific Northwest is his favorite place to have ever called home. 

Follow on Tumblr at onthathill.tumblr.com and on Twitter @BCODonnell. 

BLOCK ISLAND, RHODE ISLAND 

Block Island, rising out of the ocean about nine miles off the southern shore of Rhode Island, is the scene of one of the most tragic legends. It tells the fate of the ship Palatine and its marauded, starved passengers…

The ship Palatine — some time in the 18th century — had left Holland bound for Philadelphia with a large number of emigrants who intended to settle somewhere in Pennsylvania. They were prosperous Dutch folk, who had taken along all their money and valuables to use in their new homeland. The voyage was begun in mid-winter. The ship was greatly delayed by storms and was driven far off her course. Diminishing sup- plies of food — after weeks of buffeting frozen seas — caused the crew to mutiny. When the captain died, or was murdered, all pretense of discipline came to an end. The crew seized the arms and the remaining food and water, forcing the Dutch to pay outrageous prices for either. Twenty guilders for a cup of water and fifty-six dollars for a ship’s biscuit, soon reduced the wealth of the most opulent of the passengers and completely impoverished the poorer ones. Death by starvation put an end to the sufferings of many and others were reduced to emaciation and disease. Finally the crew, deciding that there was no more loot to be had, deserted the ship and left her to drift upon the seas with her helpless passengers. The ‘Palatine’ finally struck on the northernmost reef of Block Island, and the native wreckers made their way aboard. Sixteen persons were rescued; they were all that remained alive with the exception of an insane woman who refused to leave the ship. The wreckers attempted to tow the Palatine to a near-by cove, but a terrific gale sprang up. Seeing that the ship would be blown to sea, they set her on fire and cut her adrift. Enveloped in flames, the Palatine sailed out into the storm and the frenzied shrieks of the mad woman — who had been forgotten in the excitement — were borne back to the horrified ears of those on shore.

Rhode Island, a guide to the smallest state (WPA, 1937)

Tumblr friends at the rhodiproject send word from the Block Island Lighthouse off the shores of Rhode Island, for Field Assignments nos. 3 & 5: History & National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

"Take from the altars of the past the fire - not the ashes." 

Jean Jaures

Block Island, RI, is certainly known for its beautiful landscape, but the small island is also something of a hidden historical goldmine. I was very lucky to spend a gorgeous gray day there, visiting the Block Island Historical Society and Southeast Lighthouse, built in in 1873. 

Both sites provide insight into life on the island, including its Native and Colonial history. I was particularly interested in learning about Elizabeth Dickens, the “Bird Lady of Block Island.” Dickens was a well-known ornithologist on the island around the turn of the 19th century, who kept a bird census of the many migratory birds that passed through Block Island during their migration. Visitors to the island shouldn’t miss the opportunity to stop in to the Historical Society, located just walking distance from the ferry dock, to learn more about this fascinating woman (as well as the rest of the island’s unique cultural and natural history). 

* * *

The RHODI Project is an initiative to survey Rhode Island’s history and heritage sector. They hope to advance public access to historical knowledge and serve as a much needed impetus for collaboration in the history community. Learn more at rhodi.org and follow them on Tumblr at rhodiproject.tumblr.com.

SOUTH FLORIDA, LIFE ON THE GULF COAST
Dispatch for Field Assignment #7: Ethnography & Demographics from Noelle McCleaf on the borderline of backcountry and far out on Florida’s Gulf Coast:

Florida is at once a continuation of the Deep South and the beginning of a new realm.
—Florida: A Guide to the Southernmost State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Noelle McCleaf, was born and raised in Virginia and spent her childhood camping in Shenandoah and swimming naked in cold Pennsylvania Creeks. She has spent most of her adult life very far south in Southern Florida, where she works as a Professor of Photography and exhibiting photographer. In her spare time she photographs her mother and those close to her, who hold a deep respect for the landscape and how it sustains us. More of her work can be viewed at noellemccleaf.com. Find her on Tumblr at noellemccleaf.
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SOUTH FLORIDA, LIFE ON THE GULF COAST
Dispatch for Field Assignment #7: Ethnography & Demographics from Noelle McCleaf on the borderline of backcountry and far out on Florida’s Gulf Coast:

Florida is at once a continuation of the Deep South and the beginning of a new realm.
—Florida: A Guide to the Southernmost State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Noelle McCleaf, was born and raised in Virginia and spent her childhood camping in Shenandoah and swimming naked in cold Pennsylvania Creeks. She has spent most of her adult life very far south in Southern Florida, where she works as a Professor of Photography and exhibiting photographer. In her spare time she photographs her mother and those close to her, who hold a deep respect for the landscape and how it sustains us. More of her work can be viewed at noellemccleaf.com. Find her on Tumblr at noellemccleaf.
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SOUTH FLORIDA, LIFE ON THE GULF COAST
Dispatch for Field Assignment #7: Ethnography & Demographics from Noelle McCleaf on the borderline of backcountry and far out on Florida’s Gulf Coast:

Florida is at once a continuation of the Deep South and the beginning of a new realm.
—Florida: A Guide to the Southernmost State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Noelle McCleaf, was born and raised in Virginia and spent her childhood camping in Shenandoah and swimming naked in cold Pennsylvania Creeks. She has spent most of her adult life very far south in Southern Florida, where she works as a Professor of Photography and exhibiting photographer. In her spare time she photographs her mother and those close to her, who hold a deep respect for the landscape and how it sustains us. More of her work can be viewed at noellemccleaf.com. Find her on Tumblr at noellemccleaf.
Zoom Info

SOUTH FLORIDA, LIFE ON THE GULF COAST

Dispatch for Field Assignment #7: Ethnography & Demographics from Noelle McCleaf on the borderline of backcountry and far out on Florida’s Gulf Coast:

Florida is at once a continuation of the Deep South and the beginning of a new realm.

—Florida: A Guide to the Southernmost State (WPA, 1939)

* * *

Noelle McCleaf, was born and raised in Virginia and spent her childhood camping in Shenandoah and swimming naked in cold Pennsylvania Creeks. She has spent most of her adult life very far south in Southern Florida, where she works as a Professor of Photography and exhibiting photographer. In her spare time she photographs her mother and those close to her, who hold a deep respect for the landscape and how it sustains us. More of her work can be viewed at noellemccleaf.com. Find her on Tumblr at noellemccleaf.

GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS, NORTH CAROLINA
Guide to North Carolina Brittany Kearns logs a report for Field Assignment #1: Topography and Climate, on how the Great Smoky Mountains got their name:

The Cherokee Indians have many legends about this area, which was part of their former home. Origin of the name Great Smoky is buried in obscurity, but it was probably suggested to Indians or early settlers by the tenuous mist, a dreamy blue haze like that of Indian summer, or deeper that hovers almost always over the high peaks. Earliest official Government use of the term is in the 1789 act of cession delimiting the boundaries of North Carolina and what is now the State of Tennessee: “… thence along the highest ridge of said mountains to the place where it is called Great Iron or Smoky Mountain.”
—North Carolina: a guide to the old north state (WPA, 1939)

* * * 
Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  
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GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS, NORTH CAROLINA

Guide to North Carolina Brittany Kearns logs a report for Field Assignment #1: Topography and Climate, on how the Great Smoky Mountains got their name:

The Cherokee Indians have many legends about this area, which was part of their former home. Origin of the name Great Smoky is buried in obscurity, but it was probably suggested to Indians or early settlers by the tenuous mist, a dreamy blue haze like that of Indian summer, or deeper that hovers almost always over the high peaks. Earliest official Government use of the term is in the 1789 act of cession delimiting the boundaries of North Carolina and what is now the State of Tennessee: “… thence along the highest ridge of said mountains to the place where it is called Great Iron or Smoky Mountain.”

North Carolina: a guide to the old north state (WPA, 1939)

* * * 

Brittany Kearns is a Guide to North Carolina. An honorary Southerner, she was born in New Jersey, but now calls rural Chatham County home. She’s got a degree in anthropology, a love for documentary photography and takes film over digital any day. Follow her on Tumblr at thebeekearns.tumblr.com and check out her portfolio at BrittanyKearns.com.  

MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
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MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
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MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).

—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *

James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.”