SMALL TOWN DINERS - INDIANA

Meals served in smartly fronted little restaurants and lunch stands retain the unmistakable tang of country cooking. 

Indiana: A Guide to the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

Small town diners in Indiana: stop in a good one and you will likely meet some incredible people; owners who love to cook and are adept at running a business on a shoestring. Small town cafes are personal spaces that reflect the ups and downs of their surrounding community.  They provide a central meeting spot and a sociable place to eat alone.

How to rate a café in the Hoosier state? If hand-breaded tenderloin and homemade pie are on the menu, your order will not disappoint.

Guide Notes:

—locations—

  1. Mary Ann Rubio, Family Café, Knox, IN
  2. The Grill, LaCrosse, IN
  3. Happy Days Café, Wakarusa, IN
  4. White House Hamburgers, Logansport, IN
  5. Hamlet Café, Hamlet, IN
  6. Crockpot Café, Walkerton, IN
  7. Teel’s Family Restaurant, Mentone, IN
  8. Northside Diner, Chesterton, IN
  9. The Nook, Columbia City, IN
  10. Woodland Inn, Woodland, IN

* * *

Kay Westhues is a photographer based in South Bend, IN. Through her work she aims to describe the vitality and complexity of places and people whose lives are often overlooked and unexamined. She is inspired by the ways rural tradition and history are interpreted and transformed in the present day. You can see more of her work at kaywesthues.com or follow her latest project on tumblr (kwesthues.tumblr.com).

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

Well, shucks - guardian Travel named The American Guide a “best independent travel magazine.” We’re honored to be included on their illustrious list.

This is, of course, completely due to all our Guides and contributors. They make it a pleasure to open our dashboard every morning and we hope you’re following every one of their own blogs, sites and projects

This also seems like an opportunity to thank Tumblr’s staff. We are a strange beast - a blend of travel, photography, history and documentary very different than the other publications on the Guardian’s list. We’re able to do what we do in large part because of some awesome folks at Tumblr and the community-driven platform they produce.

A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info

A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.

With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.

This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”

Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *

Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

MARDI GRAS - NEW ORLEANS, LOUSIANA

Mardi Gras, that maddest of all mad days when every man may be a king, or, if he prefers, a tramp or a clown or an Indian chief, and dance in the streets. 

New Orleans City Guide (WPA, 1938)

If you didn’t come to party, take your bitch ass home,” shouts the man selling t-shirts on Bourbon Street. He adds, “I have size sexy for the ladies.”

The main street for Carnival Season partying in New Orleans has a distinct aroma—a mix of sweat, crawfish, Daiquiri puke and just-starting-to-rot garbage. All around the senses are assaulted with beads thrown from above, shoes getting stuck to the sticky wash that covers the street, drummers drumming, people shouting and bursts of purple, gold and green. Mardi Gras has been taking place in New Orleans since before 1835. It is a time for the loud, the grotesque, the strange and excess. While this might sound awful, it is intoxicating. The season has lasted all these years because it is what you make it.

Everyone has a different experience because no one is in charge and the celebration spreads throughout the city. If you came to party, you will find one on Bourbon. I saw lots of tits, a couple asses, hundreds of hollow plastic legs dangling around people’s necks filled with red liquor, people tumbling after one too many and too many crazy outfits to count.

The balcony people taunt the crowds below. Some put fancy trinkets on fishing wire to yank the items out of greedy, eager hands. They lay in wait to judge who is deserving of the beads. Sometimes it requires a dance or a flash and sometimes they take pity on a cute nine-year-old who is getting quite an eyeful.

Just one street over, there is the opportunity for family friendly fare. Royal Street, which turns into St. Charles when heading Uptown, is filled with jugglers and street musicians, and is also the main parade route for the bigger parades. Smartly, the first couple rows of people have chairs and right behind, people set up ladders with elaborate boxes for children to sit in for a better view. There is definitely alcohol, but people try to keep it together a little more here.

Quintron and Miss Pussycat are playing at the Spellcaster Lodge with Jello Biafra in attendance and Big Freedia is bouncing at VASO. There are fancy balls with high society that are by invitation only and parades that are solely for the people who know where they start and stop.

It can also be a time for the political. Different Krewes head different parades, all with unique themes for the year. The Krewe d’Etat is known for its biting satire and this year was no different with floats criticizing the sex trade and prison system. The Zulu Parade, that goes through the neighborhood torn apart by the freeway, celebrated the life of Nelson Mandela this year.

For me, Mardi Gras was cruising the city by bicycle and taking in the sites and sounds. The majority of the time it was a delight. Walking and making photographs, I was moved to tears during the Talladega College Marching Band’s version of Get Lucky and was surprised to find how amazing it is to make eye contact with someone on a giant float and catching the beads thrown right at me. And I already miss the smell.

Mark Twain said: “I think that I may say that an American has not seen the United States until he has seen Mardi-Gras in New Orleans.” 

* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website, TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press.

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.

North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.

Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.

* * *

Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.

THE CIRCUS DRIVE-IN - WALL TOWNSHIP, NEW JERSEY

The Circus Drive-In was established in 1954 in Wall Township, New Jersey and has been a state landmark ever since. The classic drive-in, synonymous with the 1950s, has virtually disappeared from the American landscape. But “The Circus” survives and thrives on the New Jersey shore.

Serving up fare either curbside or “under the big top”, this unique restaurant offers much more than just hamburgers and hot dogs. Specialty items include a Maryland jumbo soft shell crab sandwich, the Lobster Roll and a lobster salad sandwich served on a New England style roll. The soft shell crab sandwich has been a featured menu item since the days when the original owner would fly his own plane down to Maryland to purchase the crabs he served his customers.

Strip malls and chain stores, which reign supreme in the 21st century, seem to make America homogeneous from sea to shining sea. But there are yet some of these unique, family owned businesses that survive—and thrive—and do so in the Garden State.

* * *

North Carolina native Gregory Drew, who holds a B.A. degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, is documenting his adopted home of New Jersey. His goal is to destroy the unfair stereotypes and show the beauty and diversity of the state’s landscape and its people. He also hopes to someday give up his day job and focus on his photography full time as he travels around the USA and the world. You can follow Greg on Tumblr at http://randomlake.tumblr.com.

THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE
Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.
The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.
Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 
Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info

THE MOTELS OF GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE

Officially established in June of 1934, the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was one of many parks permanently shaped by the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Not only did they strengthen the infrastructure of the park itself, the once small mountain towns bordering the park also saw quick changes as tourism to the now visitor-friendly parks boomed with the recovery of the economy.

The town of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is one such town. In one year from 1934 to 1935, the visitors coming to the town to visit the park went from 40,000 visitors to 500,000 visitors. Over the next 15 years the price of land per acre went from $50 to $8000 an acre.

Certain areas of Gatlinburg look like a postcard from The Smoky Mountains I’d find in photo albums of my grandparents. Signs line up on the parkway with names like Old Creek Lodge, The Log Cabin Pancake House or the Sugarland Wedding Chapel. Parts of the main road in town, Eastern Parkway, look like a caricature of American Tourism during the 40s and 5’s and perhaps the most obvious evidence of this is in its motels. 

Scattered randomly amongst many chain-tourist traps such as Ripley’s and a Hard Rock cafe, these motels, lodges, chalets and inns have a certain empty stillness that makes it easy to imagine the cars, clothes and families that filled the town and park during the summers way before there were convention centers and Pucker’s Sports Bars. And while the comfortable beds of the new hotel down the street may be appealing, I’ll take a motel that looks like it’s out of a David Lynch movie and called Ogle’s Vacation Motel over a Hilton Garden Inn any day.

* * *

EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.

THROUGH SYBILLE CANYON - WHEATLAND and LARAMIE, WYOMING
To get to Laramie by way of Wheatland in Wyoming you take Highway 34, a route traveling through Sybille Canyon. It’s also called the Wheatland or Laramie Cut Across. Starting out in farm country, the highway eventually climbs to over 7,000 ft at Morton Pass and the canyon walls give way to a sparse, almost perfectly flat landscape. Weather rarely cooperates during the winter and Sybille Canyon is closed on occasion. Snow, wind and fog will keep you on your toes.
* * *
Wyoming guide Christine Tharp is a photography, history, and cycling enthusiast living in Gillette, Wyoming.  When not working, she travels the open roads of northeast Wyoming in search of curiosities old and new.  More of her work can be found at FROM THE PLAINS and she’s recently started a Tumblr for The Rockpile Museum in Campbell County, Wyoming.
Zoom Info
THROUGH SYBILLE CANYON - WHEATLAND and LARAMIE, WYOMING
To get to Laramie by way of Wheatland in Wyoming you take Highway 34, a route traveling through Sybille Canyon. It’s also called the Wheatland or Laramie Cut Across. Starting out in farm country, the highway eventually climbs to over 7,000 ft at Morton Pass and the canyon walls give way to a sparse, almost perfectly flat landscape. Weather rarely cooperates during the winter and Sybille Canyon is closed on occasion. Snow, wind and fog will keep you on your toes.
* * *
Wyoming guide Christine Tharp is a photography, history, and cycling enthusiast living in Gillette, Wyoming.  When not working, she travels the open roads of northeast Wyoming in search of curiosities old and new.  More of her work can be found at FROM THE PLAINS and she’s recently started a Tumblr for The Rockpile Museum in Campbell County, Wyoming.
Zoom Info
THROUGH SYBILLE CANYON - WHEATLAND and LARAMIE, WYOMING
To get to Laramie by way of Wheatland in Wyoming you take Highway 34, a route traveling through Sybille Canyon. It’s also called the Wheatland or Laramie Cut Across. Starting out in farm country, the highway eventually climbs to over 7,000 ft at Morton Pass and the canyon walls give way to a sparse, almost perfectly flat landscape. Weather rarely cooperates during the winter and Sybille Canyon is closed on occasion. Snow, wind and fog will keep you on your toes.
* * *
Wyoming guide Christine Tharp is a photography, history, and cycling enthusiast living in Gillette, Wyoming.  When not working, she travels the open roads of northeast Wyoming in search of curiosities old and new.  More of her work can be found at FROM THE PLAINS and she’s recently started a Tumblr for The Rockpile Museum in Campbell County, Wyoming.
Zoom Info
THROUGH SYBILLE CANYON - WHEATLAND and LARAMIE, WYOMING
To get to Laramie by way of Wheatland in Wyoming you take Highway 34, a route traveling through Sybille Canyon. It’s also called the Wheatland or Laramie Cut Across. Starting out in farm country, the highway eventually climbs to over 7,000 ft at Morton Pass and the canyon walls give way to a sparse, almost perfectly flat landscape. Weather rarely cooperates during the winter and Sybille Canyon is closed on occasion. Snow, wind and fog will keep you on your toes.
* * *
Wyoming guide Christine Tharp is a photography, history, and cycling enthusiast living in Gillette, Wyoming.  When not working, she travels the open roads of northeast Wyoming in search of curiosities old and new.  More of her work can be found at FROM THE PLAINS and she’s recently started a Tumblr for The Rockpile Museum in Campbell County, Wyoming.
Zoom Info
THROUGH SYBILLE CANYON - WHEATLAND and LARAMIE, WYOMING
To get to Laramie by way of Wheatland in Wyoming you take Highway 34, a route traveling through Sybille Canyon. It’s also called the Wheatland or Laramie Cut Across. Starting out in farm country, the highway eventually climbs to over 7,000 ft at Morton Pass and the canyon walls give way to a sparse, almost perfectly flat landscape. Weather rarely cooperates during the winter and Sybille Canyon is closed on occasion. Snow, wind and fog will keep you on your toes.
* * *
Wyoming guide Christine Tharp is a photography, history, and cycling enthusiast living in Gillette, Wyoming.  When not working, she travels the open roads of northeast Wyoming in search of curiosities old and new.  More of her work can be found at FROM THE PLAINS and she’s recently started a Tumblr for The Rockpile Museum in Campbell County, Wyoming.
Zoom Info
THROUGH SYBILLE CANYON - WHEATLAND and LARAMIE, WYOMING
To get to Laramie by way of Wheatland in Wyoming you take Highway 34, a route traveling through Sybille Canyon. It’s also called the Wheatland or Laramie Cut Across. Starting out in farm country, the highway eventually climbs to over 7,000 ft at Morton Pass and the canyon walls give way to a sparse, almost perfectly flat landscape. Weather rarely cooperates during the winter and Sybille Canyon is closed on occasion. Snow, wind and fog will keep you on your toes.
* * *
Wyoming guide Christine Tharp is a photography, history, and cycling enthusiast living in Gillette, Wyoming.  When not working, she travels the open roads of northeast Wyoming in search of curiosities old and new.  More of her work can be found at FROM THE PLAINS and she’s recently started a Tumblr for The Rockpile Museum in Campbell County, Wyoming.
Zoom Info

THROUGH SYBILLE CANYON - WHEATLAND and LARAMIE, WYOMING

To get to Laramie by way of Wheatland in Wyoming you take Highway 34, a route traveling through Sybille Canyon. It’s also called the Wheatland or Laramie Cut Across. Starting out in farm country, the highway eventually climbs to over 7,000 ft at Morton Pass and the canyon walls give way to a sparse, almost perfectly flat landscape. Weather rarely cooperates during the winter and Sybille Canyon is closed on occasion. Snow, wind and fog will keep you on your toes.

* * *

Wyoming guide Christine Tharp is a photography, history, and cycling enthusiast living in Gillette, Wyoming.  When not working, she travels the open roads of northeast Wyoming in search of curiosities old and new.  More of her work can be found at FROM THE PLAINS and she’s recently started a Tumblr for The Rockpile Museum in Campbell County, Wyoming.

CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
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At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info

CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA

This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 

Guide Notes:

  • The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
  • 12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
  • chinoskateexpress.com

* * *

At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.

'ELYSIAN FIELDS' - WISCONSIN

Some of these Wisconsin vehicles outlasted the weather and ravages of time to become daily drivers. Others found their Elysian Fields, which is where heroes went after their deaths in Greek mythology.

A broke-down automobile can sometimes have the look of a fallen hero. 

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Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.