A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info

A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.

With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.

This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”

Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *

Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info
TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 
There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.
* * *
Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblr, Instagram, or through her website.
Zoom Info

TREASURE ISLAND - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

The site of the Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 is Treasure Island, created by dredging the bay near Yerba Buena Island. … Treasure Island, once the exposition has closed and its temporary structures have been removed, will serve as a terminal for trans-Pacific flying clipper ships, which will take off and land in the sheltered lagoon between its southern edge and Yerba Buena Island. 

California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Once a novel, then a naval base, now a resting place for the intentionally or necessarily cheap of the Bay Area, Treasure Island is the San Franciscan neighborhood you’ve never heard of. Probably because it lives, alone, surrounded by the cold Pacific. Straight across the Bay, take a left at Alcatraz, and if you’ve hit Oakland, turn back—you’ve gone too far. Or, you can take the 108 bus from the Transbay Terminal, and you’ll face a stomach-dropping view of San Francisco—the whole of it laid out before you, bookended by the Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate, and rivaled only by the sunset spreading behind it. Grand. 

There is a single bar on the island. A single grocery store. A single hot dog stand. And plenty of singles. The population is diverse, but the housing is row after row of the same white two-story. Except, of course, for the housing blocks that have been sectioned off by fencing and marked with radioactivity warning signs. This is where I live. With four roommates and two hairless cats. Feeling stuck. In the middle of the Bay.

* * *

Grace Mendenhall is a sci-fi lover and yoga enthusiast who gets paid to edit videos sometimes. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a BA in Philosophy, then studied documentary photography and multimedia at the Salt Institute in Maine. She’s a native of Austin, Texas, but has lived all over the States. Now, she spends most of her time in the Bay Area, enjoying the sunshine and artisan toast. You can find her on tumblrInstagram, or through her website.

CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA
This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 
Guide Notes:
The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
chinoskateexpress.com
* * *
At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info

CHINO SKATE EXPRESS ROLLER RINK - CHINO, CALIFORNIA

This is the best skating rink in Chino. All of California, for that matter. Come for All 80s Nights, Michael Jackson Nights, Old School Funk Nights Spring Break Skates, One Direction Days and College Nights with DJ Lady P. 

Guide Notes:

  • The Chino Skate Express Roller Rink also has Mini Bowling, Bumpers Cars and Arcade Games.
  • 12356 Central Avenue, Chino, California 91710 / Phone: (909) 465-1383
  • chinoskateexpress.com

* * *

At-large guide Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website ateliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.

PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.
—California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info

PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY: LA → CUYUCOS - CALIFORNIA  

Its seashore has stretches of smoothly curving sandy beach and of saw-toothed, rock-strewn coast… The almost ever-present fog drifts in and out, drawn up the funnel-like canyons, swept back to reveal long vistas of coastline.

California: A Guide to the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

* * *

Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.

HETCH HETCHY, CALIFORNIA 
A venture to California’s Hetch Hetchy Valley —
It was once described by naturalist John Muir as being even more beautiful than Yosemite Valley. When it was dammed to provide water for the Bay Area urban areas, Muir protested:

That anyone would try to destroy [Hetch Hetchy Valley] seems; incredible; but sad experience shows that there are people good enough and bad enough for anything. The proponents of the dam scheme bring forward a lot of bad arguments to prove that the only righteous thing to do with the people’s parks is to destroy them bit by bit as they are able. Their arguments are curiously like those of the devil, devised for the destruction of the first garden. . . .
These temple destroyers, devotees of ravaging commercialism, seem to have a perfect contempt for Nature, and, instead of lifting their eyes to the God of the mountains, lift them to the Almighty Dollar.
Dam Hetch Hetchy! As well dam for water-tanks the people’s cathedrals and churches, for no holier temple has ever been consecrated by the heart of man.

The Hetch Hetchy Valley has been flooded for 100 years.
* * *
Maxwell K. Tattnall is the English moniker for a travelling student who temporarily lives in California. She fell in love with the American landscapes and when Maxwell isn’t studying or working inside a room for days on end, she is roaming the mountains, forests or shores.” Follow her on Tumblr at blog.bitbonton.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
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HETCH HETCHY, CALIFORNIA 
A venture to California’s Hetch Hetchy Valley —
It was once described by naturalist John Muir as being even more beautiful than Yosemite Valley. When it was dammed to provide water for the Bay Area urban areas, Muir protested:

That anyone would try to destroy [Hetch Hetchy Valley] seems; incredible; but sad experience shows that there are people good enough and bad enough for anything. The proponents of the dam scheme bring forward a lot of bad arguments to prove that the only righteous thing to do with the people’s parks is to destroy them bit by bit as they are able. Their arguments are curiously like those of the devil, devised for the destruction of the first garden. . . .
These temple destroyers, devotees of ravaging commercialism, seem to have a perfect contempt for Nature, and, instead of lifting their eyes to the God of the mountains, lift them to the Almighty Dollar.
Dam Hetch Hetchy! As well dam for water-tanks the people’s cathedrals and churches, for no holier temple has ever been consecrated by the heart of man.

The Hetch Hetchy Valley has been flooded for 100 years.
* * *
Maxwell K. Tattnall is the English moniker for a travelling student who temporarily lives in California. She fell in love with the American landscapes and when Maxwell isn’t studying or working inside a room for days on end, she is roaming the mountains, forests or shores.” Follow her on Tumblr at blog.bitbonton.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
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HETCH HETCHY, CALIFORNIA 
A venture to California’s Hetch Hetchy Valley —
It was once described by naturalist John Muir as being even more beautiful than Yosemite Valley. When it was dammed to provide water for the Bay Area urban areas, Muir protested:

That anyone would try to destroy [Hetch Hetchy Valley] seems; incredible; but sad experience shows that there are people good enough and bad enough for anything. The proponents of the dam scheme bring forward a lot of bad arguments to prove that the only righteous thing to do with the people’s parks is to destroy them bit by bit as they are able. Their arguments are curiously like those of the devil, devised for the destruction of the first garden. . . .
These temple destroyers, devotees of ravaging commercialism, seem to have a perfect contempt for Nature, and, instead of lifting their eyes to the God of the mountains, lift them to the Almighty Dollar.
Dam Hetch Hetchy! As well dam for water-tanks the people’s cathedrals and churches, for no holier temple has ever been consecrated by the heart of man.

The Hetch Hetchy Valley has been flooded for 100 years.
* * *
Maxwell K. Tattnall is the English moniker for a travelling student who temporarily lives in California. She fell in love with the American landscapes and when Maxwell isn’t studying or working inside a room for days on end, she is roaming the mountains, forests or shores.” Follow her on Tumblr at blog.bitbonton.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
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HETCH HETCHY, CALIFORNIA 

A venture to California’s Hetch Hetchy Valley —

It was once described by naturalist John Muir as being even more beautiful than Yosemite Valley. When it was dammed to provide water for the Bay Area urban areas, Muir protested:

That anyone would try to destroy [Hetch Hetchy Valley] seems; incredible; but sad experience shows that there are people good enough and bad enough for anything. The proponents of the dam scheme bring forward a lot of bad arguments to prove that the only righteous thing to do with the people’s parks is to destroy them bit by bit as they are able. Their arguments are curiously like those of the devil, devised for the destruction of the first garden. . . .

These temple destroyers, devotees of ravaging commercialism, seem to have a perfect contempt for Nature, and, instead of lifting their eyes to the God of the mountains, lift them to the Almighty Dollar.

Dam Hetch Hetchy! As well dam for water-tanks the people’s cathedrals and churches, for no holier temple has ever been consecrated by the heart of man.

The Hetch Hetchy Valley has been flooded for 100 years.

* * *

Maxwell K. Tattnall is the English moniker for a travelling student who temporarily lives in California. She fell in love with the American landscapes and when Maxwell isn’t studying or working inside a room for days on end, she is roaming the mountains, forests or shores.” Follow her on Tumblr at blog.bitbonton.com.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

FROM THE TOP OF MT. TAMALPAIS - CALIFORNIA 

The road below is impossible to see as of now. We have been carving up the side-winding roads of the Marin Hills in Marin County, California for what seems like forever. Each turn and straightaway reveals a completely new landscape and perspective than before, dwarfing the city of San Francisco off in the hazy distance.

Mount Tamalpais, also known as Mount Tam or “Sleeping Maiden,” is the highest peak in Marin County. The summit, which is 2,574 ft above sea level, offers a spectacular aerial view of San Francisco, Oakland, Marin County, the Pacific Ocean, and the Bay. The Mount serves as a symbol of Marin County, which is known for its national parks and inclination to preservation. Tamalpais is joined by many other recreational areas in Marin, altogether providing nearly 40 miles of publicly accessible open space.

This is the Mount where Alan Watts, the great British philosopher, peacefully died in his sleep in his hillside cabin. The Mount that Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac hiked in the late ’50s with poet Gary Snyder, leading Kerouac to write his pseudo-buddhist novel The Dharma Bums. From the peak of Mount Tamalpais, you certainly get a glimpse into the splendor and mysticism of the landscape. As I stood anchored between the large boulders at the summit peering down at the now specks of San Francisco, I was reminded of my favorite Kerouac quote—presumably inspired by Mount Tam and other hiking adventures: “One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple,” Jack muses within the pages of The Dharma Bums. Looking down at the green and blue world below Tam’s great heights solidifies his statement, for atop Mount Tamalpais all is right, and simple.

* * *

Shelby Pollard is an independent visual artist, writer, and musician.  He was born in a rural southern Illinois town, but now calls Chicago home.  He is a lover of all things truly American, a beard enthusiast, and a whiskey advocate.  You can find his work at chicagodailyart.tumblr.com, hear his music at minorcharactersmusic.com, or follow him on Twitter.

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
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PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 
* * *
New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.
Zoom Info

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

The roads leading into PETALUMA (Ind., beautiful view)…which calls itself “The World’s Egg Basket” and has been called “Chickaluma” are often clogged by trucks heavily loaded with crates of eggs and white leghorns. … Although the Mexican colony here dated from 1833 and the Yankee settlement from 1852, Petaluma rose to prominence only with the founding of its major commercial activity by a young Canadian, Lyman Ryce, who decided in 1878 that the region was adapted to poultry raising and sent to Canada for some white leghorns.

California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

My hometown of Petaluma, California is known for many things; the annual Butter & Eggs Day Parade, the World’s Ugliest Dog Contest, the tragic 1993 murder of Polly Klaas, the Phoenix Theater where Sublime played their very last show, the artists and crafts people. Its location— nestled between the upscale vineyards of Napa Valley and the gray rocky coasts of  Bodega Bay—makes it an ideal location for agriculture, and to this day there are still many nationally-loved dairies, creameries, breweries, and farms producing delicious, organic goods. 

Last time I was in town I noticed something new in the windows of a grand old bank building: “Save $$ Invest in Your Garden.” It turns out Petaluma is now also home to a large seed bank, filled with 1,400 varieties of non-GMO heirloom seeds, some very rare. The Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Bank is interesting even for non-gardeners such as myself to visit, and the concept of a commercial seed bank is one worth spreading. It’s this agricultural history and local love for real-deal food that make Petaluma an interesting place to visit if you are ever north of San Francisco. 

* * *

New York City Guide Lydia White was born on the 4th of July and has been an independent spirit ever since. She spends her free time exploring what NYC and the surrounding areas have to offer. White has been photographing interesting people and unusual landscapes for nearly a decade. Follow her on Tumblr at lydia makes pictures or on her website, LydiaWhitePhotography.com.

BATKID DAY - SAN FRANCISCO 

The #AmericanGuideWeek Field Manual — in Field Assignment #4: Folk Festivals, Pageants, Celebrations and Customs — instructs the guide to:

Describe any local folk festivals or celebrations of annual or periodic recurrence.

A/G Week volunteer guide Cameron Getty took heed and sends scenes from the San Francisco Make-a-Wish BatKid event that took place on November 15th, 2013 throughout the city.

* * *

Cameron Getty is a San Francisco-based photographer. Follow on camerongetty.com

Editor’s note: We’re reblogging this great post from Lynora Valdez because the first time around we very foolishly neglected to include her Tumblr site - weirdispretty.tumblr.com - and her portfolio site - cargocollective.com/lynoraclarisa. Do yourself a favor and follow her work.

TRANSPORTATION - CALIFORNIA

Lynora Valdez is an American born female photographer with a Colombian and Mexican heritage. She only shoots film and she usually shoots straight out of her car or while driving around. Accordingly, she sends in this meditation on the pace of travel for Field Assignment #9 - Transportation:

As an American, how we get places has a lot to do with who we are, what we were, and what we’ll become. There’s something romantic about the amount of time it takes to get places by trains. Trains allow your thoughts to develop and allow for nostalgia to settle in. With today’s world, we’re moving so fast it’s hard to think about much more than the traffic that’s in front of us. I like the quiet moments we get in-between all of our lives’ transits. This is about them.

* * *

Lynora Valdez is a recent graduate from UCSC who’s currently based in Los Angeles. She’s very interested in familial relationships and how they shape the people and choices we make. She creates quiet images that allow the viewer to reference an earlier time or an earlier memory that may not have crossed their mind in a long time. She’s still an avid darkroom user. Keep film alive. Follow her on Tumblr at weirdispretty.tumblr.com and find her website at cargocollective.com/lynoraclarisa.

LASSEN VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK - MINERAL, CALIFORNIA

The weird, lava-devastated acres of [Lassen Volcanic National Park] are full of evidence of historic and prehistoric volcanic upheavals—sheer, jagged cliffs; great irregularly shaped rocks; fumaroles; boiling lakes, and mud pots that bubble and steam angrily; and wide ejecta-strewn areas where the countryside was laid waste by hot blasts, smothering lava, and mud flows. … In winter, when the park is a rolling blanket of snow, the gas and steam vents present a paradoxical picture of boiling coldness.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Kelly Curtis reports from the plug-dome volcanic heights of Lassen Peak for American Guide Week Field Assignment #1 - Topography and Climate:

Lassen Peak in Lassen National Park, California is one of the easier 10,457 foot peaks to climb. Drive to the trailhead, located at 8,500 feet, and enjoy a rocky 2,000 foot hike in 2.5 miles one way. The views are worth the effort and achieving this kind of elevation is quite the achievement, especially if the hike down is done in the dark under shooting stars. Though night hikes are an exceptional way to experience America’s mountain lands, they aren’t for everyone. If Lassen Peak is accomplished during the day bring sunscreen and a hat. This is High Desert land! 
Read more about Lassen National Park and Lassen Peak Trail from the National Park Service. 

* * *
Kelly Curtis is a writer living in Alturas, California. Follow her on Tumblr at highdesertliving.tumblr.com.
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LASSEN VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK - MINERAL, CALIFORNIA

The weird, lava-devastated acres of [Lassen Volcanic National Park] are full of evidence of historic and prehistoric volcanic upheavals—sheer, jagged cliffs; great irregularly shaped rocks; fumaroles; boiling lakes, and mud pots that bubble and steam angrily; and wide ejecta-strewn areas where the countryside was laid waste by hot blasts, smothering lava, and mud flows. … In winter, when the park is a rolling blanket of snow, the gas and steam vents present a paradoxical picture of boiling coldness.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Kelly Curtis reports from the plug-dome volcanic heights of Lassen Peak for American Guide Week Field Assignment #1 - Topography and Climate:

Lassen Peak in Lassen National Park, California is one of the easier 10,457 foot peaks to climb. Drive to the trailhead, located at 8,500 feet, and enjoy a rocky 2,000 foot hike in 2.5 miles one way. The views are worth the effort and achieving this kind of elevation is quite the achievement, especially if the hike down is done in the dark under shooting stars. Though night hikes are an exceptional way to experience America’s mountain lands, they aren’t for everyone. If Lassen Peak is accomplished during the day bring sunscreen and a hat. This is High Desert land! 
Read more about Lassen National Park and Lassen Peak Trail from the National Park Service. 

* * *
Kelly Curtis is a writer living in Alturas, California. Follow her on Tumblr at highdesertliving.tumblr.com.
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LASSEN VOLCANIC NATIONAL PARK - MINERAL, CALIFORNIA

The weird, lava-devastated acres of [Lassen Volcanic National Park] are full of evidence of historic and prehistoric volcanic upheavals—sheer, jagged cliffs; great irregularly shaped rocks; fumaroles; boiling lakes, and mud pots that bubble and steam angrily; and wide ejecta-strewn areas where the countryside was laid waste by hot blasts, smothering lava, and mud flows. … In winter, when the park is a rolling blanket of snow, the gas and steam vents present a paradoxical picture of boiling coldness.

California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Kelly Curtis reports from the plug-dome volcanic heights of Lassen Peak for American Guide Week Field Assignment #1 - Topography and Climate:

Lassen Peak in Lassen National Park, California is one of the easier 10,457 foot peaks to climb. Drive to the trailhead, located at 8,500 feet, and enjoy a rocky 2,000 foot hike in 2.5 miles one way. The views are worth the effort and achieving this kind of elevation is quite the achievement, especially if the hike down is done in the dark under shooting stars. Though night hikes are an exceptional way to experience America’s mountain lands, they aren’t for everyone. If Lassen Peak is accomplished during the day bring sunscreen and a hat. This is High Desert land! 

Read more about Lassen National Park and Lassen Peak Trail from the National Park Service. 

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Kelly Curtis is a writer living in Alturas, California. Follow her on Tumblr at highdesertliving.tumblr.com.