SMALL TOWN DINERS - INDIANA

Meals served in smartly fronted little restaurants and lunch stands retain the unmistakable tang of country cooking. 

Indiana: A Guide to the Hoosier State (WPA, 1941)

Small town diners in Indiana: stop in a good one and you will likely meet some incredible people; owners who love to cook and are adept at running a business on a shoestring. Small town cafes are personal spaces that reflect the ups and downs of their surrounding community.  They provide a central meeting spot and a sociable place to eat alone.

How to rate a café in the Hoosier state? If hand-breaded tenderloin and homemade pie are on the menu, your order will not disappoint.

Guide Notes:

—locations—

  1. Mary Ann Rubio, Family Café, Knox, IN
  2. The Grill, LaCrosse, IN
  3. Happy Days Café, Wakarusa, IN
  4. White House Hamburgers, Logansport, IN
  5. Hamlet Café, Hamlet, IN
  6. Crockpot Café, Walkerton, IN
  7. Teel’s Family Restaurant, Mentone, IN
  8. Northside Diner, Chesterton, IN
  9. The Nook, Columbia City, IN
  10. Woodland Inn, Woodland, IN

* * *

Kay Westhues is a photographer based in South Bend, IN. Through her work she aims to describe the vitality and complexity of places and people whose lives are often overlooked and unexamined. She is inspired by the ways rural tradition and history are interpreted and transformed in the present day. You can see more of her work at kaywesthues.com or follow her latest project on tumblr (kwesthues.tumblr.com).

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
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FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
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FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info
FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.
—Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *
Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.
Zoom Info

FISHERFOLK - NEW ENGLAND

The hardihood of the fisherfolk and the sailors is still evident, and the mores of an insular colony remain constant. Manhood, for instance, is determined not by legal age but by the first fishing trip. When a stripling passes this initiation, he takes to smoking a corncob pipe and is recognized as a man, no matter what his age.

Rhode Island, A Guide To the Smallest State (WPA, 1937)

* * *

Michael Cevoli is your Guide to New England. He was born and raised in Norfolk County, Massachusetts and now lives and works on the water in the seafaring town of Warren, Rhode Island. He’s a commercial and editorial photographer and you can follow his work on Tumblr, or on his website.

MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
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MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
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MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
Zoom Info
MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
Zoom Info
MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
Zoom Info
MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
Zoom Info
MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
Zoom Info
MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
Zoom Info
MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
Zoom Info
MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.
I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”
* * *
West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.
Zoom Info

MINER PRIDE IN THE TUG VALLEY - MINGO COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, and PIKE COUNTY, KENTUCKY

The southern miner, his face and overalls coated with coal dust, slow of speech yet cursing fluently to pad his thin conversation, tenaciously holding to the ideas of his father’s religion, and striking boldly for what he considers justice in social, economic, and political life.

—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

Miner decals, they range from the straightforward to the humorous. Some even imbue overtly sexual connotations. All are an outward declaration, a statement, of miner pride.

I’ve driven through mall parking lots and stopped at gas stations to find them. The first one I remember seeing was while driving through Logan County, West Virginia. It said “Friends in Low Places.”

* * *

West Virginia Guide Roger May is a proud Appalachian and documentary photographer currently living in Raleigh, North Carolina, but born and raised in the Tug Valley region of southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. He’s currently enrolled in the Certificate in Documentary Arts program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, where he’s also a part time instructor. Find him on Twitter at walkyourcamera and keep up with his writing and photography at walkyourcamera.com.

ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.
Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors theidea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.
—Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 
That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.
* * *
David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

ARTESIA, MISSISSIPPI

ARTESIA, 55 m. (223 alt., 612 pop.), is the junction point of the main line of the Mobile & Ohio R.R. and its Columbus and Starkville branches. It takes its name from an artesian well N. of the depot. Unusually large quantities of hay are shipped from this point.

Between here and Macon the dominant features of the landscape are the HEDGES OF OSAGE ORANGE TREES planted in fence-like rows along the prairie’s edge. The highway runs like a narrow lane between their thorny, tangled branches. In winter these prickly trees are etched grayly against the sky, but in summer they burst into smooth green leaves and pale yellowish blossoms, which are replaced by orange-like inedible fruit. Many of these hedges were planted more than a century ago and constitute the pioneer planters’ mark upon the land. They confined stock and kept prying Indians out of cornfields, and they conveyed to neighbors the
idea that the land encircled by the thorny fences was private property. Sometimes called bois d’ arc (Fr., wood of the ark), these trees, according to legend, furnished the sturdy wood out of which Noah built the ark. When lumber is cut from the trees, the tough wood often breaks the teeth of the saw.

Mississippi, A Guide To the Magnolia State (WPA, 1938)

Many of the bois d’ arc trees still line the streets and fields of Artesia, though most are too big to be considered hedges. A lot of the trees have been replaced by metal barbed wire and chain-link fencing to mark changes in ownership and usage. The rail road that runs through town now is operated by Kansas City Southern (KCS). The big junction that was there in the 1930s is little more than a switching yard with three sets of tracks. The population, too, has decreased to 435 people, and will likely continue to drop. 

That doesn’t mean the people who are there aren’t happy to live in Artesia. Early in the morning people are out walking in the sun and the warm weather—enjoying the day and the quiet peace of the town. Like so many places in Mississippi, nature dominates—whether it is strolling down main street or venturing into the forest.

* * *

David Jones is a State Guide to Mississippi. While going to school, he lived in five of the Southern states, from Virginia to Texas. Currently he can be found traveling the highways and back roads of Mississippi, helping people out when he can and exploring the hidden treasures of the state. You can find him on Tumblr at woodprof.tumblr.com.

COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
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COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
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COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
Zoom Info
COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
Zoom Info
COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
Zoom Info
COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
Zoom Info
COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
Zoom Info

COMMERCE, GEORGIA

Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.

* * *

Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 

Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 

INDUSTRY and MANUFACTURING - BRISTOL, TENNESSEE
Friend to the American Guide, Ben Collins, is the Brand and Digital Strategist at the venerable and innovative L. C. King Manufacturing Company, makers of Pointer Brand workwear. As L. C. King proudly manufactures all their products in the U. S. of A., we approached Ben about sending a dispatch on industry in Pointer’s hometown of Bristol. 
Not only did he send in the fantastic post that follows, but Pointer is generously supporting American Guide Week by offering 15% off purchases on their website with the code “americanguide”. Visit Pointer at www.pointerbrand.com and check out Ben’s post for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

These are my unequivocally unbiased views about the fair twin city of Bristol, Tennessee and Bristol, Virginia. Written by Ben Collins,
What are the principal factories in your district?
The L. C. King Manufacturing Company, of course, makers of denim and workwear since 1913 in downtown Bristol, Tennessee. There is also a pharmaceutical company which was once called King Pharmaceuticals and is now owned by Pfizer. We have a globally successful factory in Virginia called Bristol Compressors. There are a few successful metal-related factories including Tri-City Aluminum Extrusion, diamond plate manufacturing by Sturdy-Lite, and others.
What are the principal industries and industrial products?
Tourism is very important to the city with Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion annually, the Birthplace of Country Music Museum (open in 2014), the Appalachian Cultural Music Association, Bristol Motor Speedway, Antique Automobile Club of America, some of the best trout fishing east of the Mississippi.
Bristol has an attractive downtown (by far the most impressive in the region, of course) with a variety of stimulating shopping and dining opportunities. Very sophisticated mens’ haberdasheries and ladies’ clothing shops alongside burger joints, soul food, farm-to-table Wednesdays and weekly wine tastings.
As mentioned before, the manufacture of metal products appears to be a successful industry here.  Also, industrial recycling has become a sector with for-profit metal, asphalt, and even concrete recycling occurring.
We have a top notch Wellmont medical facility called Bristol Regional Medical Center, which is host to advanced medical technology and staff as well as nearby Medical Schools.  King University in Bristol recently began the development of a medical program.
Are there any commercial articles manufactured by hand?
We have again to mention the L. C. King Manufacturing Company; sellers, distributors, and exporters of fine workwear products - perhaps the finest known in the whole of the United States. Also made here are delicious candies including hand rolled peppermint by the Ratliff family. A commercially successful and also tasty snack is made on the Virginia side of town - Shearer’s potato chips.  Bristol has been known also for producing some high quality hand made stringed instruments.  Additionally, modern, high-quality custom furniture is made right in downtown at Mooska.
Are there important mines or quarries in your district? Give types.
In the district, yes, of course coal is a common mineral in the Appalachian region.  Only historically has Bristol been a resource for iron and more distantly, flint.
What are the general agricultural products and specialties of your district?
There is a thriving economy among our local agricultural community and the ever increasing hunger for fresh goods by today’s consumer. Perhaps best known for our heirloom tomatoes (their season is anticipated eagerly), the incredible array of meats is possibly the most impressive cultivated product.  You can find lamb, pork, all cuts of steak, sausage, goat, even Moroccan Spiced chorizo. On a large scale, however, corn and hay production (for feeding cattle) are the primary uses of land by farmers.
What are other important products (Ex. Logs, fur, beef, wool)
Batteries, beauty products, moonshine, beer, art.
When may interesting processes, such as fruit picking and packing, log-rolling and the like be witnessed?
A new winery has appeared east of Bristol that now has a press annually.  At the Bristol Train Station downtown, there are frequently trains coming to this important junction between the rail systems of two states. There are corn and other harvests done around September. No log-rolling these days, though during the summer we have the South Holston Lake cleanup.

Images (top to bottom, left to right):
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
Pointer factory (Nicole Poyo);
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
The Defibulators at the 2013 Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion (Photo director: Lee Jones);
Wall map (Tammy Mercure).
* * *
Ben Collins is a 20 year Bristol Resident, originally from North Florida. He’s an employee of the L. C. King Manufacturing Company and volunteer on the Bristol Main Street Board of Directors. Find L.C. King’s Pointer Brand workwear online at www.pointerbrand.com, follow them on Tumblr at pointerbrand.tumblr.com, like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pointerbrand, and follow them on Twitter (@pointerbrand) and Instagram (pointerbrand).
Zoom Info
INDUSTRY and MANUFACTURING - BRISTOL, TENNESSEE
Friend to the American Guide, Ben Collins, is the Brand and Digital Strategist at the venerable and innovative L. C. King Manufacturing Company, makers of Pointer Brand workwear. As L. C. King proudly manufactures all their products in the U. S. of A., we approached Ben about sending a dispatch on industry in Pointer’s hometown of Bristol. 
Not only did he send in the fantastic post that follows, but Pointer is generously supporting American Guide Week by offering 15% off purchases on their website with the code “americanguide”. Visit Pointer at www.pointerbrand.com and check out Ben’s post for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

These are my unequivocally unbiased views about the fair twin city of Bristol, Tennessee and Bristol, Virginia. Written by Ben Collins,
What are the principal factories in your district?
The L. C. King Manufacturing Company, of course, makers of denim and workwear since 1913 in downtown Bristol, Tennessee. There is also a pharmaceutical company which was once called King Pharmaceuticals and is now owned by Pfizer. We have a globally successful factory in Virginia called Bristol Compressors. There are a few successful metal-related factories including Tri-City Aluminum Extrusion, diamond plate manufacturing by Sturdy-Lite, and others.
What are the principal industries and industrial products?
Tourism is very important to the city with Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion annually, the Birthplace of Country Music Museum (open in 2014), the Appalachian Cultural Music Association, Bristol Motor Speedway, Antique Automobile Club of America, some of the best trout fishing east of the Mississippi.
Bristol has an attractive downtown (by far the most impressive in the region, of course) with a variety of stimulating shopping and dining opportunities. Very sophisticated mens’ haberdasheries and ladies’ clothing shops alongside burger joints, soul food, farm-to-table Wednesdays and weekly wine tastings.
As mentioned before, the manufacture of metal products appears to be a successful industry here.  Also, industrial recycling has become a sector with for-profit metal, asphalt, and even concrete recycling occurring.
We have a top notch Wellmont medical facility called Bristol Regional Medical Center, which is host to advanced medical technology and staff as well as nearby Medical Schools.  King University in Bristol recently began the development of a medical program.
Are there any commercial articles manufactured by hand?
We have again to mention the L. C. King Manufacturing Company; sellers, distributors, and exporters of fine workwear products - perhaps the finest known in the whole of the United States. Also made here are delicious candies including hand rolled peppermint by the Ratliff family. A commercially successful and also tasty snack is made on the Virginia side of town - Shearer’s potato chips.  Bristol has been known also for producing some high quality hand made stringed instruments.  Additionally, modern, high-quality custom furniture is made right in downtown at Mooska.
Are there important mines or quarries in your district? Give types.
In the district, yes, of course coal is a common mineral in the Appalachian region.  Only historically has Bristol been a resource for iron and more distantly, flint.
What are the general agricultural products and specialties of your district?
There is a thriving economy among our local agricultural community and the ever increasing hunger for fresh goods by today’s consumer. Perhaps best known for our heirloom tomatoes (their season is anticipated eagerly), the incredible array of meats is possibly the most impressive cultivated product.  You can find lamb, pork, all cuts of steak, sausage, goat, even Moroccan Spiced chorizo. On a large scale, however, corn and hay production (for feeding cattle) are the primary uses of land by farmers.
What are other important products (Ex. Logs, fur, beef, wool)
Batteries, beauty products, moonshine, beer, art.
When may interesting processes, such as fruit picking and packing, log-rolling and the like be witnessed?
A new winery has appeared east of Bristol that now has a press annually.  At the Bristol Train Station downtown, there are frequently trains coming to this important junction between the rail systems of two states. There are corn and other harvests done around September. No log-rolling these days, though during the summer we have the South Holston Lake cleanup.

Images (top to bottom, left to right):
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
Pointer factory (Nicole Poyo);
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
The Defibulators at the 2013 Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion (Photo director: Lee Jones);
Wall map (Tammy Mercure).
* * *
Ben Collins is a 20 year Bristol Resident, originally from North Florida. He’s an employee of the L. C. King Manufacturing Company and volunteer on the Bristol Main Street Board of Directors. Find L.C. King’s Pointer Brand workwear online at www.pointerbrand.com, follow them on Tumblr at pointerbrand.tumblr.com, like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pointerbrand, and follow them on Twitter (@pointerbrand) and Instagram (pointerbrand).
Zoom Info

INDUSTRY and MANUFACTURING - BRISTOL, TENNESSEE

Friend to the American Guide, Ben Collins, is the Brand and Digital Strategist at the venerable and innovative L. C. King Manufacturing Company, makers of Pointer Brand workwear. As L. C. King proudly manufactures all their products in the U. S. of A., we approached Ben about sending a dispatch on industry in Pointer’s hometown of Bristol. 

Not only did he send in the fantastic post that follows, but Pointer is generously supporting American Guide Week by offering 15% off purchases on their website with the code “americanguide”. Visit Pointer at www.pointerbrand.com and check out Ben’s post for Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry:

These are my unequivocally unbiased views about the fair twin city of Bristol, Tennessee and Bristol, Virginia. Written by Ben Collins,

What are the principal factories in your district?

The L. C. King Manufacturing Company, of course, makers of denim and workwear since 1913 in downtown Bristol, Tennessee. There is also a pharmaceutical company which was once called King Pharmaceuticals and is now owned by Pfizer. We have a globally successful factory in Virginia called Bristol Compressors. There are a few successful metal-related factories including Tri-City Aluminum Extrusion, diamond plate manufacturing by Sturdy-Lite, and others.

What are the principal industries and industrial products?

Tourism is very important to the city with Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion annually, the Birthplace of Country Music Museum (open in 2014), the Appalachian Cultural Music Association, Bristol Motor Speedway, Antique Automobile Club of America, some of the best trout fishing east of the Mississippi.

Bristol has an attractive downtown (by far the most impressive in the region, of course) with a variety of stimulating shopping and dining opportunities. Very sophisticated mens’ haberdasheries and ladies’ clothing shops alongside burger joints, soul food, farm-to-table Wednesdays and weekly wine tastings.

As mentioned before, the manufacture of metal products appears to be a successful industry here.  Also, industrial recycling has become a sector with for-profit metal, asphalt, and even concrete recycling occurring.

We have a top notch Wellmont medical facility called Bristol Regional Medical Center, which is host to advanced medical technology and staff as well as nearby Medical Schools.  King University in Bristol recently began the development of a medical program.

Are there any commercial articles manufactured by hand?

We have again to mention the L. C. King Manufacturing Company; sellers, distributors, and exporters of fine workwear products - perhaps the finest known in the whole of the United States. Also made here are delicious candies including hand rolled peppermint by the Ratliff family. A commercially successful and also tasty snack is made on the Virginia side of town - Shearer’s potato chips.  Bristol has been known also for producing some high quality hand made stringed instruments.  Additionally, modern, high-quality custom furniture is made right in downtown at Mooska.

Are there important mines or quarries in your district? Give types.

In the district, yes, of course coal is a common mineral in the Appalachian region.  Only historically has Bristol been a resource for iron and more distantly, flint.

What are the general agricultural products and specialties of your district?

There is a thriving economy among our local agricultural community and the ever increasing hunger for fresh goods by today’s consumer. Perhaps best known for our heirloom tomatoes (their season is anticipated eagerly), the incredible array of meats is possibly the most impressive cultivated product.  You can find lamb, pork, all cuts of steak, sausage, goat, even Moroccan Spiced chorizo. On a large scale, however, corn and hay production (for feeding cattle) are the primary uses of land by farmers.

What are other important products (Ex. Logs, fur, beef, wool)

Batteries, beauty products, moonshine, beer, art.

When may interesting processes, such as fruit picking and packing, log-rolling and the like be witnessed?

A new winery has appeared east of Bristol that now has a press annually.  At the Bristol Train Station downtown, there are frequently trains coming to this important junction between the rail systems of two states. There are corn and other harvests done around September. No log-rolling these days, though during the summer we have the South Holston Lake cleanup.

Images (top to bottom, left to right):
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
Pointer factory (Nicole Poyo);
Bristol resident (Tammy Mercure);
The Defibulators at the 2013 Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion (Photo director: Lee Jones);
Wall map (Tammy Mercure).

* * *

Ben Collins is a 20 year Bristol Resident, originally from North Florida. He’s an employee of the L. C. King Manufacturing Company and volunteer on the Bristol Main Street Board of Directors. Find L.C. King’s Pointer Brand workwear online at www.pointerbrand.com, follow them on Tumblr at pointerbrand.tumblr.com, like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pointerbrand, and follow them on Twitter (@pointerbrand) and Instagram (pointerbrand).

A BRIEF GUIDE TO PHILLY, WHICH BEGINS WITH FDR SKATEPARK - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
First Stop. FDR skatepark (pictured, 1, 2) is a homemade, DIY skatepark made by skaters and beautified by some of Philly’s best graffiti artists. It’s one of the city’s greatest community projects, gathering so many people together and embodies what it means to be both a skateboarder and a city dweller.
Stop Two. From FDR, you go next to cheesesteaks. This cheesesteak (pictured, 3) is from Pat’s, which is one of the more popular and touristy spots. There are probably better places to find a good cheesesteak in town, but, in terms of atmosphere, it doesn’t get much better than Pat’s (located at the south end of the Italian Market in South Philly).
Stop Three. If there’s one thing other than cheesesteaks that Philadelphia abounds in, it’s abandoned factories. Like many great cities of the northeast, it was once a center of manufacturing and industry; nicknamed the “Workshop of the World” for its industrial Delaware waterfront in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This empty factory with the smokeless smokestacks (pictured, 4) is located in Pennsport, an industrial section of the city that doesn’t get as much action as it once did.
Stop Four. A pretty typical Philly street (pictured, 5), consisting of mostly two and sometimes three story rowhomes. Most residential streets outside of Center city — whether North, South or West — look something like this. These houses are what’s left of working class Philly. That’s not to say the city isn’t a working class city, it’s just not working class in the traditional last century definition of the word (see Stop Three above, the empty factory in Pennsport).
Stop Five. The Ben Franklin Bridge (pictured, 6; view from) looks down Second Street. You can see Mr. Bar Stool, Christ Church, the US Customs House Building, and, finally, the Society Hill Towers by I.M. Pei.
Last Stop. (Pictured, 7: “203 homicides so far this year in Philadelphia.”) A reminder of a Philly plagued by crime, drug trade and prostitution. A bit of perspective from a local church into what daily life is like for a lot of Philadelphians, and how many families are affected by violence.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO PHILLY, WHICH BEGINS WITH FDR SKATEPARK - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
First Stop. FDR skatepark (pictured, 1, 2) is a homemade, DIY skatepark made by skaters and beautified by some of Philly’s best graffiti artists. It’s one of the city’s greatest community projects, gathering so many people together and embodies what it means to be both a skateboarder and a city dweller.
Stop Two. From FDR, you go next to cheesesteaks. This cheesesteak (pictured, 3) is from Pat’s, which is one of the more popular and touristy spots. There are probably better places to find a good cheesesteak in town, but, in terms of atmosphere, it doesn’t get much better than Pat’s (located at the south end of the Italian Market in South Philly).
Stop Three. If there’s one thing other than cheesesteaks that Philadelphia abounds in, it’s abandoned factories. Like many great cities of the northeast, it was once a center of manufacturing and industry; nicknamed the “Workshop of the World” for its industrial Delaware waterfront in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This empty factory with the smokeless smokestacks (pictured, 4) is located in Pennsport, an industrial section of the city that doesn’t get as much action as it once did.
Stop Four. A pretty typical Philly street (pictured, 5), consisting of mostly two and sometimes three story rowhomes. Most residential streets outside of Center city — whether North, South or West — look something like this. These houses are what’s left of working class Philly. That’s not to say the city isn’t a working class city, it’s just not working class in the traditional last century definition of the word (see Stop Three above, the empty factory in Pennsport).
Stop Five. The Ben Franklin Bridge (pictured, 6; view from) looks down Second Street. You can see Mr. Bar Stool, Christ Church, the US Customs House Building, and, finally, the Society Hill Towers by I.M. Pei.
Last Stop. (Pictured, 7: “203 homicides so far this year in Philadelphia.”) A reminder of a Philly plagued by crime, drug trade and prostitution. A bit of perspective from a local church into what daily life is like for a lot of Philadelphians, and how many families are affected by violence.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO PHILLY, WHICH BEGINS WITH FDR SKATEPARK - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA
First Stop. FDR skatepark (pictured, 1, 2) is a homemade, DIY skatepark made by skaters and beautified by some of Philly’s best graffiti artists. It’s one of the city’s greatest community projects, gathering so many people together and embodies what it means to be both a skateboarder and a city dweller.
Stop Two. From FDR, you go next to cheesesteaks. This cheesesteak (pictured, 3) is from Pat’s, which is one of the more popular and touristy spots. There are probably better places to find a good cheesesteak in town, but, in terms of atmosphere, it doesn’t get much better than Pat’s (located at the south end of the Italian Market in South Philly).
Stop Three. If there’s one thing other than cheesesteaks that Philadelphia abounds in, it’s abandoned factories. Like many great cities of the northeast, it was once a center of manufacturing and industry; nicknamed the “Workshop of the World” for its industrial Delaware waterfront in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This empty factory with the smokeless smokestacks (pictured, 4) is located in Pennsport, an industrial section of the city that doesn’t get as much action as it once did.
Stop Four. A pretty typical Philly street (pictured, 5), consisting of mostly two and sometimes three story rowhomes. Most residential streets outside of Center city — whether North, South or West — look something like this. These houses are what’s left of working class Philly. That’s not to say the city isn’t a working class city, it’s just not working class in the traditional last century definition of the word (see Stop Three above, the empty factory in Pennsport).
Stop Five. The Ben Franklin Bridge (pictured, 6; view from) looks down Second Street. You can see Mr. Bar Stool, Christ Church, the US Customs House Building, and, finally, the Society Hill Towers by I.M. Pei.
Last Stop. (Pictured, 7: “203 homicides so far this year in Philadelphia.”) A reminder of a Philly plagued by crime, drug trade and prostitution. A bit of perspective from a local church into what daily life is like for a lot of Philadelphians, and how many families are affected by violence.
* * *
Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.
Zoom Info

A BRIEF GUIDE TO PHILLY, WHICH BEGINS WITH FDR SKATEPARK - PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

First Stop. FDR skatepark (pictured, 1, 2) is a homemade, DIY skatepark made by skaters and beautified by some of Philly’s best graffiti artists. It’s one of the city’s greatest community projects, gathering so many people together and embodies what it means to be both a skateboarder and a city dweller.

Stop Two. From FDR, you go next to cheesesteaks. This cheesesteak (pictured, 3) is from Pat’s, which is one of the more popular and touristy spots. There are probably better places to find a good cheesesteak in town, but, in terms of atmosphere, it doesn’t get much better than Pat’s (located at the south end of the Italian Market in South Philly).

Stop Three. If there’s one thing other than cheesesteaks that Philadelphia abounds in, it’s abandoned factories. Like many great cities of the northeast, it was once a center of manufacturing and industry; nicknamed the “Workshop of the World” for its industrial Delaware waterfront in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This empty factory with the smokeless smokestacks (pictured, 4) is located in Pennsport, an industrial section of the city that doesn’t get as much action as it once did.

Stop Four. A pretty typical Philly street (pictured, 5), consisting of mostly two and sometimes three story rowhomes. Most residential streets outside of Center city — whether North, South or West — look something like this. These houses are what’s left of working class Philly. That’s not to say the city isn’t a working class city, it’s just not working class in the traditional last century definition of the word (see Stop Three above, the empty factory in Pennsport).

Stop Five. The Ben Franklin Bridge (pictured, 6; view from) looks down Second Street. You can see Mr. Bar Stool, Christ Church, the US Customs House Building, and, finally, the Society Hill Towers by I.M. Pei.

Last Stop. (Pictured, 7: “203 homicides so far this year in Philadelphia.”) A reminder of a Philly plagued by crime, drug trade and prostitution. A bit of perspective from a local church into what daily life is like for a lot of Philadelphians, and how many families are affected by violence.

* * *

Northeast Guide Chris Giuliano is a photographer and student living in the NY/NJ/PA region. Traveling throughout these states, and often to other places as well, he is able to see and capture a wide variety of life, and hopes to portray the way he sees the world to other people through his photographs. Follow on his blog, chrisgphoto.wordpress.com, and his website, chrisgiuliano.com.

THE OIL VEIN - SPEARFISH, SOUTH DAKOTA / GLENDIVE, MONTANA

Gold: Men in all ages have lived for it, fought for it, died for it… It was gold that filled the Black Hills with tens of thousands of people drawn from all parts of the country and that gave to the State an impetus which still is felt.

A South Dakota Guide (WPA, 1938)

You could say the same about oil today. Oil: We live for it, fight for it, die for it. It is oil that has filled the not-so-long-ago barren acres of North Dakota—just east of that state’s badlands—with tens of thousands of people drawn from all parts of the country.

The promise of gold in the latter half of the 19th-century made the region. Because after the gold veins stopped bleeding, people stayed and put down roots, even if they stayed only because they didn’t have the means to leave. Yes, there was (and still is) ranching—along with a dogged sense of self-sufficiency—but it was that shot at fortune, and therefore freedom, that gave the Dakotas its frontier spirit. And it’s what’s remaking the region now: the Bakken shale, stretching across 200,000 square miles with the city of Williston at its center, and its promise of 7.4 billion barrels of oil and 6.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas.

There’s gold in North Dakota.

—SPEARFISH, SOUTH DAKOTA—

Go to the Back Porch bar in Spearfish, South Dakota, and you just might meet Jake, in his big yellow tinted glasses and wild white mustache. Shake his hand and you’ll feel just three fingers in your grip. It’s a ghostly feeling, but one he doesn’t mind letting you experience.

The way Jake tells it, the other two digits were lost working in the oil fields during North Dakota’s last boom in the 1970s and ‘80s. He’s a Texan by birth and after he was discharged from the Army, he asked for a one-way ticket to the Dakotas—a place he’d never been—to follow the promise of work and oil.

He found it. Just not for long. In 1980, the price of oil was a record $40 a barrel. Thousands of workers flooded Williston and nearby Dickinson in North Dakota. But the high energy prices of the 1970s bottomed out and by 1986, the price dropped to $9 a barrel. The New York Times said, “when prices crashed…workers in the small city of Dickinson left the coffee in their cups when they quit their trailers.”

Today, the oil boom is again in Williston and Dickinson. What’s changed is that the price of a barrel of oil is again high and reserves that were previously inaccessible have been made accessible by hydraulic fracturing. First discovered in 1951 with only moderate prospects, the U.S. Geological Survey now calls the Bakken shale foundation the largest continuous oil accumulation it has ever seen.

—GLENDIVE, MONTANA—

There are stories of people coming from all over—as far away as Florida, even—to work the Bakken. On a Friday night about an hour and a half west of the shale in Glendive, Montana, the Beer Jug bar rail is lined with Coors Lite and Miller Lite cans, many claimed by oil workers who spend their days on the other side of the state line.

You start overhearing talk of the Bakken. And when the pyramid of cans is stacked high enough, it’s alright to ask questions. Out here, they might as well say the Bakken is better than Jesus. It’s a savior to a land that hasn’t had much since the last boom went bust. The bar talk is about $40 an hour jobs and an economy that will last 15, maybe 30 years—something to raise a family with.

A recent estimate puts over 40,000 oil industry jobs in North Dakota, plus an additional 18,000 jobs supporting the industry. The state has a three percent unemployment rate and the Williston region is around one percent. When you hear that, you say, “I’m moving to North Dakota.”

But, people out here know what follows the good times. This is a one-generation boom. The children of the workers today will not inherit their parents’ jobs. Many workers don’t even bring their families with them when they come to work the Bakken. So, the infrastructure is in a stasis. Looking at the landscape, investments are made in hotel building, where rooms can run you over $650 a week.

Service jobs are in such demand that McDonald’s pays a starting wage of $15 an hour. Strippers say they can earn more in one night of tips than most Americans take home in pay for a month.

Driving down Interstate 94—right through the Bakken—you ask yourself: what will happen once the region’s population grows 50 percent, as it’s predicted to, in the next 20 years and then disappears in the 20 years after that?

Map Note: “An aerial view of farmland dotted with oil rigs and pumps, near Ray, North Dakota, in 2009. The image is 11 miles across (north is to the left), and the contrast has been boosted to distinguish oil rig pads from farmhouses and natural features. See this region on Google Maps. (© Google, Inc.) (Source: The Atlantic.)

* * *

Tom McNamara is the co-editor of THE AMERICAN GUIDE.

WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info
WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info
WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info
WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info
WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
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WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info

WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.

Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers. 

Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.

The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents. 

Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction.

Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 

Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning

(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)

* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.

Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com

HANDLE WITH CARE - DETROIT, MICHIGAN


There is drama in Detroit: …the drama of change and never-ending readjustments to fluctuating social and economic conditions. There is hope in Detroit, for, with all its youth and the impatience born of youth, it is willing to make mistakes, to experiment on a tremendous scale both within and without its factories…It has strength and it has power: …the power of willing hands, eager to work 
—Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)


so detroit is bankrupt. everyone has an opinion on how or why it happened. everyone seems to have their own idea on how to fix it (stay away from the art at the Detroit Institute of Arts. it’s not for sale). i could even go on with my hows and whys, but i think this picture says all that i really have to say about it.
* * *
Jonathan Miller is our Guide to Detroit, the city where he lives and works as a hotel maintenance manager. You know that thing you broke at that hotel, he fixed it. His photography is on tumblr at detroitmaintenanceman and everything else is at his website, detroitmaintenance.
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HANDLE WITH CARE - DETROIT, MICHIGAN

There is drama in Detroit: …the drama of change and never-ending readjustments to fluctuating social and economic conditions. There is hope in Detroit, for, with all its youth and the impatience born of youth, it is willing to make mistakes, to experiment on a tremendous scale both within and without its factories…It has strength and it has power: …the power of willing hands, eager to work 

Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

so detroit is bankrupt. everyone has an opinion on how or why it happened. everyone seems to have their own idea on how to fix it (stay away from the art at the Detroit Institute of Arts. it’s not for sale). i could even go on with my hows and whys, but i think this picture says all that i really have to say about it.

* * *

Jonathan Miller is our Guide to Detroit, the city where he lives and works as a hotel maintenance manager. You know that thing you broke at that hotel, he fixed it. His photography is on tumblr at detroitmaintenanceman and everything else is at his website, detroitmaintenance.