AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FIELD REPORTS, ASSIGNMENT #3

Take Pride, It’s the American Guide

YOUR ASSIGNMENT, TRUSTED GUIDE:

The original American Guide series of books was produced by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration in the 1930s and ’40s. Your A/G editors unearthed the actual mimeographed field manual from 1935 that was sent out to each WPA state research office. Editors, researchers, and volunteers used the manual as a basis for collecting information on their district.

We’re asking you to do the same. Stay tuned all this week as we release 10 assignments drawn from the 1935 manual for the upcoming American Guide Week (Nov. 18-24). Use these questions as your guide for contributing #AmericanGuideWeek content. For your third assignment, Class II - Historical.  

CLASS II - HISTORICAL

Furnish information on the following subjects:

Exploration

Founding (Date, Founder or founders, Type of early settlers, Reason or purpose of settlement, Successive influence of settlers)

Historical importance

Important historical events (Wars, Raids, Floods, Epidemics, Gold rushes, as well as Industrial advances and depressions, Civic Achievements)

Important personages (All fields—cultural, industrial, political)

BE A GUIDE. SHOW AMERICA TO AMERICANS. 

Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photosillustrations and writing that answer these questions and describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things.

Check out a couple of past A/G posts on history here and here. Now go out there and describe/photograph/draw what it’s like where you live. 

This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.

Check out A/G Week assignments here.

#americanguideweek

SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 

Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.

County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).

But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

SIKH PARADE - STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA

“I just got back from the Sikh Parade,” I tell my friends. “The what?” they say. “The Sikh Parade. Starts near the beginning of San Joaquin Street, snakes through Downtown and across Weber, then back up California Street. Ya know?”

“Never heard of it.”

I’ve attended the Sikh Parade for three years in a row now, and I maintain that it is one of the most enjoyable and liberating events that Stockton, California, has to offer its residents.

Fresh, delicious Indian food is available on every street corner. Cultural music spills out of float speakers as they roll by. A wash of vibrant, colorful fabric streams through the street — collecting the bright spring sunlight and reflecting it against shop windows and the dashboards of parked cars.

In 2012, the April parade preluded the October celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Stockton Gurdwara on South Grant Street. This temple is the first permanent Sikh settlement in the United States, and Sikhs from all over the California Central Valley come to visit and participate in the parade’s progression through the city.

The Sikh parade happens each year at the tail end of April. 

* * *

Brandon Getty is a State Guide to California, specifically the Central Valley region and his home city of Stockton. Follow on Tumblr at Maps to Stockton, on blogspot at Shooting Daggers, or on his Carbonmade Portfolio.

Iowans may appear indifferent to the natural beauty of their State and to its amazing power as a producer of foodstuffs, but when asked to help with the production of an Iowa guide book, they responded generously.

Iowa, A Guide To the Hawkeye State (WPA, 1938) 

We start the day with this quote to prompt the question, where ARE you Iowa? And you, Missouri? What about you? We need you! Are the streets of St. Louis and Des Moines empty? Has the Mississippi run dry? Have the fields and hollers been abandoned?

Delawareans, you get a call out, too. We’ve got a single photo from Delaware. That’s it. We need you, too!

To the rest of you: it’s been an amazing week, folks. Yesterday saw fantastic contributions from the states we publicly shamed — Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Wisconsin — and we’ll be sharing those today. If you haven’t seen your post yet, don’t worry, it’s still to come. We’ve got a backlog of fantastic material that we’re rolling out.

Very importantly, please let us know if you’ve tagged a post for AG Week (#AmericanGuideWeek) and haven’t heard a direct thanks from us. We’ve come across several contributions that weren’t showing up in the search and we don’t want to lose anybody. Message us on Tumblr or email us at theamericanguide@gmail.com.

Alright, people, roll up your sleeves and be a Guide for one last day!