CUSTOM HOUSE WHARF – PORTLAND, MAINE

Portland, Maine is better than ever. I suppose there might be some dyed-in-the-wool native Mainers who would disagree and harken back to some memory they’re holding onto from yesteryear, but in my lifetime Portland has never looked so good. The abundance of culture is astounding—music, art, food… It’s more prevalent than years past and the quality is on par with (if not actually better than) much larger cities. But as much as I love getting back to my native state and seeing what newness Portland has to offer, I also appreciate Portland for how much it hasn’t changed.

As quickly as Portland continues to evolve, The Custom House Wharf is the best example of what hasn’t budged one bit. This has always been a commercial, working waterfront. Ferryboats going out, ferryboats coming in. Trawlers going out, trawlers coming in. Lobster boats going out, lobster boats coming in.It doesn’t stop. There is constant activity along the waterline, but somehow time stands still on Custom House Wharf. Every building looks as though it’s been there forever and might possibly fall down tomorrow.

Whenever I can I like to stroll the wharf and breathe in the salt water and the slightly foul stench of bait and whatever sea life is being processed behind closed doors. It is a spot unlike any other in town. Most of downtown Portland has been very well preserved, and the brick buildings appear as they always have—and they look to stand another century or more—but here on the wharf you wonder how it’s lasted this long without a renovation. The wooden façades are grey and raw, stripped bare by the constant, salty sea breeze that renders everything to its greyest and brownest core. There are hints of yellow where newer pieces of plywood have been used as patchwork, slowly mellowing with the weather.

There are a few places to poke your head into—one of the best fish markets in town, and a diner, as well as a comedy club. But most of the buildings are private and they are as nondescript as the barren wood they are constructed from. There is a rough and ugly beauty to this piece of Portland that’s a reminder of what the city was literally and figuratively built on. It’s living history, and it continues to be a fantastic contrast to all the things that are changing everywhere else in town.

* * *

Guide to the Northeast Brett Klein lives in Connecticut and works in New York, but prefers small town life and his home state of Maine. Any chance to get rural is a mental vacation. Follow Klein on Tumblr at The Coast is Clear. His curatorial collection of Americana, rural life, other artists and ephemera can be seen on Tumblr at Tons of Land.

LIBERTY TOOL CO. – LIBERTY, MAINE

There are many ways to get to Liberty, Maine, and that is why it takes so long. The 30-mile journey from coastal Rockland should take about 45 minutes, but when you leave the coastline and head inland, the bounty of the countryside and the infinite side roads are simply a temptation. It is too easy to forgo the direct route that your navigation system recommends and choose one of the more enticing side roads. And once you’ve made that first welcome detour it is like peeling an onion. It may be a bit more roundabout this way, but the scenery is worth it. In late winter you’ll also need to factor in the ubiquitous potholes and frost heaves that are incredibly unforgiving and require driving below the speed limit for intermittent stretches.

Along the way you may pass through the towns of Union, Freedom and Hope. Or countless others that are quiet and desolate and draw so little attention to themselves that you may not realize you’re passing through a town at all. It is typically a tall, steepled church or a small nondescript post office that betrays the town center.

Liberty, Maine is just such a town, only there are a couple things that set it apart. One is The Old Octagonal Post Office from 1870, which is hard to miss (and now on the national historical register - open on Saturdays in summer). The other is Liberty Tool Company, a large three-story building in the center of town.

Even on an empty Main Street in the middle of March it is clear this is the heart of the place. With a population of less than 1,000 and just a few commercial buildings, there is almost nothing else in Liberty to distract you from it. And once you’re inside, it is difficult to tear yourself away.

From the Liberty Tool website:

The Liberty Tool Company consists of a four-story balloon framed building built circa 1885. Until the Liberty Village General Store was constructed across the street in 1891 (it is six inches higher than the Liberty Tool Company), this building was the largest wooden structure between Belfast and Augusta. In the old days, Liberty was a main overnight stagecoach stop with a number of hotels, canneries, foundries and other enterprises. The Liberty Tool Co. building was a general store with a rooming house on the second floor and a dance hall on the third floor.

Today it is known for tools, specifically hand tools, and it is the largest second-hand tool store in New England. The first floor is simply overflowing with tools and hardware. Apparently they also likes to poke some fun: on a large wooden cabinet with 50-plus drawers, among the ordinary labeled drawers such as “Allen Wrenches” and “Door Hardware,” you’ll also find ones labeled “Left Handed Kanuter Pins,” “Peyote Buttons,” “Fig Newtons” and “Nuclear Waste.”

The second floor is more tools, but also books and more books. On the third floor—“Grandma’s Attic”—in addition to more tools you’ll also find antiques and curios, as well as a lending library. On a sunny day in July perhaps you’d be tempted to sit awhile and flip through one of the numerous titles available to you, but in mid-March with the outside temperature hovering at freezing, there is no incentive to stay too long in Grandma’s Attic as the inside temperature is also hovering at freezing. Despite the old adage that “heat rises,” that would not be the case at Liberty Tool. The oversized wood stove on the first floor does a wonderful job cranking out heat to about arm’s length, but from there the heat simply disappears like it does in all old buildings. Also, as the shopkeeper told me, all the metal tools do a great job of sucking up the heat so it can’t find its way upstairs.

There are few actual destinations among all these small towns in this interior piece of mid-coast Maine, but Liberty Tool is one worth finding, and if you’re anywhere remotely close the journey is absolutely worth making.

Guide note: Liberty Tool is located at 57 Main Street in Liberty, ME. Hours - Wednesday through Sunday, 9:00am-5:00pm; open at 7:30am on Saturdays; open by request on extreme cold weather days (call ahead).

* * *

Guide to the Northeast Brett Klein lives in Connecticut and works in New York, but prefers small town life and his home state of Maine. Any chance to get rural is a mental vacation. Follow Klein on Tumblr at The Coast is Clear. His curatorial collection of Americana, rural life, other artists and ephemera can be seen on Tumblr at Tons of Land.

RHODE ISLAND TO MAINE AND BACK AGAIN

Happy Valentine’s Day, Tumblr-verse! Your Guide to New England, the fabulous Brittany Marcoux (aka brittanymarcoux on Tumblr), is helming our Instagram account for a long weekend of cabins and winter wooded wonderlands.

Bears on the streets of Boston and sunsets on snowy Maine beaches have already happened. Follow us over at instagram.com/americanguide as Brittany takes over our hearts and our feed!

MAINE TIMBER COUNTRY

The tree has symbolized the land, people, and wealth of the New England region long before Europeans stumbled onto its shores. The tree has been portrayed, as well, on countless New England maps, flags, and documents: official, sacred and mundane.

To put things in perspective, the first colonial coin featured a tree. The New England forest was claimed by the British Crown in the 17th century as timber became New England’s first big colonial calling card. Wood was of military import to the British Empire as a timber-starved England desperately needed wood ship masts for its ever-growing Navy. In fact, the first sawmill in North America was built in York, Maine, in 1623 for the express purpose of exporting lumber to England. The America timber industry was born as custom-built ships transported 100’ white pine ship masts and other lumber to the homeland in mass-market fashion. Nearly four hundred years later, the timber business continues to be a dynamic force on the Maine landscape, economy, and people.

From highways crowded with logging trucks to piles of timber stacked three stories high, it’s evident on the ground that timber is big business here. Almost 90 percent of the state of Maine is cover by forest and approximately 66 percent of the land is timberland. In 2005, the annual revenues from Maine’s forest topped $6 billion ($5.31 billion in forest-based manufacturing and $1.5 billion from forest-related recreation and tourism).

Beyond the dollars, timber benefits include stewardship of regional green space, wildlife habitat, and clean watersheds. The timber industry also offers a constant supply of environmental critique that range from chemicals used in the paper sector to woodland habitat loss.

Long gone are the days when unfortunate lumberjacks were buried in unmarked graves with their boots nailed to the nearest tree, but logging-related danger still looms on Maine’s back roads and highways. Ask any mother in Maine about heavily loaded, speeding logging trucks on local roads and you will be schooled.

Below the billboard issues lie the detail and cultural texture of living in a tree state. Abandoned skidders, landings, bottle cap clubs, nurse stumps, wood poaching, and wood pile contests are but a few of the cultural details of timber country. Logging roads and timber tracts provide the greatest cultural context, especially in terms of social and recreation opportunities. Their unintended use include hiking, bird watching, motocross, ski-dooing, and countless other wholesome outdoor activities. Far from prying eyes, these remote places host a bit of devious mischief, as well. Among other activities, quiet logging roads serve as popular under-age “drinking roads” — as evident by occasional trails of empty “road soda” cans. Such beer cans are but tiny shiny blips in the never-ending feedback loop between man and nature within the cultural landscape of America’s premier “Pine Tree State.”

Editor’s Note: David Buckley Borden is participating in the Boston Fun-A-Day 2014 project by developing 31, one-page landscape installation proposals during the month of January. The work is a freewheeling exploration of the New England landscape and our cultural love affair with the region’s “great outdoors.”

Follow Fun-A-Day Boston at http://funadayboston.tumblr.com/. And if you’re in the region, stop by the Fun-A-Day Boston 2014 show hosted by Voltage Coffee & Art (Opening Reception February 21st, 7-9pm; Show runs February 17th through April 5th).

* * *

David Buckley Borden is an artist, landscape designer (highly unlicensed landscape architect), and humorist hailing from the great state of New England. David’s art includes a variety of creative work ranging from landscape installations to silkscreen prints covering an even greater variety of interests in landscape architecture, all things “great outdoors,” and the past, present and future challenges to the lands of North America. Outside of work, when not leading his one-man campaign for sustainable cutis anserine americana, David can be found quietly playing in the dirt in and around his Cambridge, Massachusetts home.

Find more of his work at davidbuckleyborden.com, on Tumblr atdavidbuckleyborden.tumblr.com and follow him on instagram

WHAT REMAINS EAST - EAST MILLINOCKET, MAINE

At EAST MILLINOCKET…the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. 
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


East Millinocket used to be an affluent community rooted in a thriving paper industry. The town’s paper mill has been struggling for the last decade, and since then the town has seen a large population drop, homes falling into disrepair, and economic depression. The few thousand people who remain in this town have a dignity that allows them to continue working and living in this community.
* * *
Mitch Borden is a working photographer. He attended Northern Michigan University where he earned a bachelors degree in Art & Design with a minor in Political Science.  He recently finished studying documentary photography and multimedia storytelling at the Salt Institute in Portland, ME. This series was a product of Mitch’s time at the Salt Institute. To see more of his work go to mbordenphoto.com or you can also follow Mitch on tumblr at http://mitchkebab.tumblr.com/.
Zoom Info
WHAT REMAINS EAST - EAST MILLINOCKET, MAINE

At EAST MILLINOCKET…the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. 
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


East Millinocket used to be an affluent community rooted in a thriving paper industry. The town’s paper mill has been struggling for the last decade, and since then the town has seen a large population drop, homes falling into disrepair, and economic depression. The few thousand people who remain in this town have a dignity that allows them to continue working and living in this community.
* * *
Mitch Borden is a working photographer. He attended Northern Michigan University where he earned a bachelors degree in Art & Design with a minor in Political Science.  He recently finished studying documentary photography and multimedia storytelling at the Salt Institute in Portland, ME. This series was a product of Mitch’s time at the Salt Institute. To see more of his work go to mbordenphoto.com or you can also follow Mitch on tumblr at http://mitchkebab.tumblr.com/.
Zoom Info
WHAT REMAINS EAST - EAST MILLINOCKET, MAINE

At EAST MILLINOCKET…the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. 
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


East Millinocket used to be an affluent community rooted in a thriving paper industry. The town’s paper mill has been struggling for the last decade, and since then the town has seen a large population drop, homes falling into disrepair, and economic depression. The few thousand people who remain in this town have a dignity that allows them to continue working and living in this community.
* * *
Mitch Borden is a working photographer. He attended Northern Michigan University where he earned a bachelors degree in Art & Design with a minor in Political Science.  He recently finished studying documentary photography and multimedia storytelling at the Salt Institute in Portland, ME. This series was a product of Mitch’s time at the Salt Institute. To see more of his work go to mbordenphoto.com or you can also follow Mitch on tumblr at http://mitchkebab.tumblr.com/.
Zoom Info
WHAT REMAINS EAST - EAST MILLINOCKET, MAINE

At EAST MILLINOCKET…the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. 
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


East Millinocket used to be an affluent community rooted in a thriving paper industry. The town’s paper mill has been struggling for the last decade, and since then the town has seen a large population drop, homes falling into disrepair, and economic depression. The few thousand people who remain in this town have a dignity that allows them to continue working and living in this community.
* * *
Mitch Borden is a working photographer. He attended Northern Michigan University where he earned a bachelors degree in Art & Design with a minor in Political Science.  He recently finished studying documentary photography and multimedia storytelling at the Salt Institute in Portland, ME. This series was a product of Mitch’s time at the Salt Institute. To see more of his work go to mbordenphoto.com or you can also follow Mitch on tumblr at http://mitchkebab.tumblr.com/.
Zoom Info
WHAT REMAINS EAST - EAST MILLINOCKET, MAINE

At EAST MILLINOCKET…the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. 
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


East Millinocket used to be an affluent community rooted in a thriving paper industry. The town’s paper mill has been struggling for the last decade, and since then the town has seen a large population drop, homes falling into disrepair, and economic depression. The few thousand people who remain in this town have a dignity that allows them to continue working and living in this community.
* * *
Mitch Borden is a working photographer. He attended Northern Michigan University where he earned a bachelors degree in Art & Design with a minor in Political Science.  He recently finished studying documentary photography and multimedia storytelling at the Salt Institute in Portland, ME. This series was a product of Mitch’s time at the Salt Institute. To see more of his work go to mbordenphoto.com or you can also follow Mitch on tumblr at http://mitchkebab.tumblr.com/.
Zoom Info
WHAT REMAINS EAST - EAST MILLINOCKET, MAINE

At EAST MILLINOCKET…the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. 
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


East Millinocket used to be an affluent community rooted in a thriving paper industry. The town’s paper mill has been struggling for the last decade, and since then the town has seen a large population drop, homes falling into disrepair, and economic depression. The few thousand people who remain in this town have a dignity that allows them to continue working and living in this community.
* * *
Mitch Borden is a working photographer. He attended Northern Michigan University where he earned a bachelors degree in Art & Design with a minor in Political Science.  He recently finished studying documentary photography and multimedia storytelling at the Salt Institute in Portland, ME. This series was a product of Mitch’s time at the Salt Institute. To see more of his work go to mbordenphoto.com or you can also follow Mitch on tumblr at http://mitchkebab.tumblr.com/.
Zoom Info
WHAT REMAINS EAST - EAST MILLINOCKET, MAINE

At EAST MILLINOCKET…the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. 
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


East Millinocket used to be an affluent community rooted in a thriving paper industry. The town’s paper mill has been struggling for the last decade, and since then the town has seen a large population drop, homes falling into disrepair, and economic depression. The few thousand people who remain in this town have a dignity that allows them to continue working and living in this community.
* * *
Mitch Borden is a working photographer. He attended Northern Michigan University where he earned a bachelors degree in Art & Design with a minor in Political Science.  He recently finished studying documentary photography and multimedia storytelling at the Salt Institute in Portland, ME. This series was a product of Mitch’s time at the Salt Institute. To see more of his work go to mbordenphoto.com or you can also follow Mitch on tumblr at http://mitchkebab.tumblr.com/.
Zoom Info
WHAT REMAINS EAST - EAST MILLINOCKET, MAINE

At EAST MILLINOCKET…the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. 
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


East Millinocket used to be an affluent community rooted in a thriving paper industry. The town’s paper mill has been struggling for the last decade, and since then the town has seen a large population drop, homes falling into disrepair, and economic depression. The few thousand people who remain in this town have a dignity that allows them to continue working and living in this community.
* * *
Mitch Borden is a working photographer. He attended Northern Michigan University where he earned a bachelors degree in Art & Design with a minor in Political Science.  He recently finished studying documentary photography and multimedia storytelling at the Salt Institute in Portland, ME. This series was a product of Mitch’s time at the Salt Institute. To see more of his work go to mbordenphoto.com or you can also follow Mitch on tumblr at http://mitchkebab.tumblr.com/.
Zoom Info

WHAT REMAINS EAST - EAST MILLINOCKET, MAINE

At EAST MILLINOCKET…the forest comes almost to the back doors of the small houses. 

Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

East Millinocket used to be an affluent community rooted in a thriving paper industry. The town’s paper mill has been struggling for the last decade, and since then the town has seen a large population drop, homes falling into disrepair, and economic depression. The few thousand people who remain in this town have a dignity that allows them to continue working and living in this community.

* * *

Mitch Borden is a working photographer. He attended Northern Michigan University where he earned a bachelors degree in Art & Design with a minor in Political Science.  He recently finished studying documentary photography and multimedia storytelling at the Salt Institute in Portland, ME. This series was a product of Mitch’s time at the Salt Institute. To see more of his work go to mbordenphoto.com or you can also follow Mitch on tumblr at http://mitchkebab.tumblr.com/.

WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info

WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)

Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.

Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.

* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.

KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE
These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.
The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 
This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.
I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 
* * *
Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info

KENNEDY PARK BASKETBALL COURTS - PORTLAND, MAINE

These photos are from the Kennedy Park basketball courts in Portland, Maine. The courts are nestled in the neighborhood that locals call “Portland’s Projects.” It is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Portland, for that matter, probably all of Maine. The state currently has the whitest and oldest demographic in in the U.S.

The courts are a borderland between public housing and new development. They host a diverse and quirky community, and are also just a nice place to hang out for the afternoon. Throughout the day, activity ebbs and flows. People cross through on their way to the mosque, to say hi to friends, or shoot hoops. 

This is a brief moment in the life of a thriving public space in Portland - a city which recently moved to develop one of its main downtown parks.

I was drawn to the way the space redefines the neighborhood it is in—if not for outsiders, then at least for the people who call that block their home. It is an active, communal and safe space in an area that would otherwise be considered threatening. 

* * *

Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling and made this series as part of her work this fall at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.

LIVEABOARDS - PORTLAND, MAINE
Elicia Epstein checks in for American Guide Week with a dispatch on two residents of Portland’s small liveaboard community:

Sophi and Travis live on a 35-foot house boat on Chandler’s Wharf with their dog, Bella, their large furry cat, Frankie, and their 2-month-old baby, Felix
Liveaboards are people who choose to live on their boats all year round. In a city like Seattle, there are an estimated 500 or more houseboats on the water. In Portland, Maine, the community is much smaller, but still thriving. Sophi and Travis are two of a handful of people who call Chandler’s Wharf their home. They live with their dog, cat and 2-month old on a 35-foot boat.

* * *

Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
LIVEABOARDS - PORTLAND, MAINE
Elicia Epstein checks in for American Guide Week with a dispatch on two residents of Portland’s small liveaboard community:

Sophi and Travis live on a 35-foot house boat on Chandler’s Wharf with their dog, Bella, their large furry cat, Frankie, and their 2-month-old baby, Felix
Liveaboards are people who choose to live on their boats all year round. In a city like Seattle, there are an estimated 500 or more houseboats on the water. In Portland, Maine, the community is much smaller, but still thriving. Sophi and Travis are two of a handful of people who call Chandler’s Wharf their home. They live with their dog, cat and 2-month old on a 35-foot boat.

* * *

Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
LIVEABOARDS - PORTLAND, MAINE
Elicia Epstein checks in for American Guide Week with a dispatch on two residents of Portland’s small liveaboard community:

Sophi and Travis live on a 35-foot house boat on Chandler’s Wharf with their dog, Bella, their large furry cat, Frankie, and their 2-month-old baby, Felix
Liveaboards are people who choose to live on their boats all year round. In a city like Seattle, there are an estimated 500 or more houseboats on the water. In Portland, Maine, the community is much smaller, but still thriving. Sophi and Travis are two of a handful of people who call Chandler’s Wharf their home. They live with their dog, cat and 2-month old on a 35-foot boat.

* * *

Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
LIVEABOARDS - PORTLAND, MAINE
Elicia Epstein checks in for American Guide Week with a dispatch on two residents of Portland’s small liveaboard community:

Sophi and Travis live on a 35-foot house boat on Chandler’s Wharf with their dog, Bella, their large furry cat, Frankie, and their 2-month-old baby, Felix
Liveaboards are people who choose to live on their boats all year round. In a city like Seattle, there are an estimated 500 or more houseboats on the water. In Portland, Maine, the community is much smaller, but still thriving. Sophi and Travis are two of a handful of people who call Chandler’s Wharf their home. They live with their dog, cat and 2-month old on a 35-foot boat.

* * *

Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
LIVEABOARDS - PORTLAND, MAINE
Elicia Epstein checks in for American Guide Week with a dispatch on two residents of Portland’s small liveaboard community:

Sophi and Travis live on a 35-foot house boat on Chandler’s Wharf with their dog, Bella, their large furry cat, Frankie, and their 2-month-old baby, Felix
Liveaboards are people who choose to live on their boats all year round. In a city like Seattle, there are an estimated 500 or more houseboats on the water. In Portland, Maine, the community is much smaller, but still thriving. Sophi and Travis are two of a handful of people who call Chandler’s Wharf their home. They live with their dog, cat and 2-month old on a 35-foot boat.

* * *

Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info

LIVEABOARDS - PORTLAND, MAINE

Elicia Epstein checks in for American Guide Week with a dispatch on two residents of Portland’s small liveaboard community:

Sophi and Travis live on a 35-foot house boat on Chandler’s Wharf with their dog, Bella, their large furry cat, Frankie, and their 2-month-old baby, Felix

Liveaboards are people who choose to live on their boats all year round. In a city like Seattle, there are an estimated 500 or more houseboats on the water. In Portland, Maine, the community is much smaller, but still thriving. Sophi and Travis are two of a handful of people who call Chandler’s Wharf their home. They live with their dog, cat and 2-month old on a 35-foot boat.

* * *

Elicia Epstein is just beginning. She studies studio art and documentary storytelling. You can see some of her work at eliciaepstein.com or email her to say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.

WOLFE’S NECK WOODS STATE PARK - FREEPORT, MAINE
Kathryn Loup is one of those excellent folks who rallied in the waning hours to send in a dispatch from Maine. She reports in for Field Assignment #5 - Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

If you are in Freeport, ME and need a break from the (excellent) shopping there, take a short drive out of town to Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park. The park, situated on Casco Bay, spans over 200 acres with woods and coastline, hiking and cross-country skiing trails, and varied wildlife.
As a relative newcomer to the East Coast, I found the rockiness of the land and coastline a surprise. Wolfe’s Neck Park is a particularly beautiful setting, in winter and summer.

* * *
Kathryn Loup is a transplanted Midwesterner (Michigan mainly), now in Massachusetts. Everything there is so close, she’s trying to visit many different places in New England. You can find her on Tumblr at purekathryn.tumblr.com or more of her photos on Flickr at purekathryn.
Zoom Info
WOLFE’S NECK WOODS STATE PARK - FREEPORT, MAINE
Kathryn Loup is one of those excellent folks who rallied in the waning hours to send in a dispatch from Maine. She reports in for Field Assignment #5 - Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

If you are in Freeport, ME and need a break from the (excellent) shopping there, take a short drive out of town to Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park. The park, situated on Casco Bay, spans over 200 acres with woods and coastline, hiking and cross-country skiing trails, and varied wildlife.
As a relative newcomer to the East Coast, I found the rockiness of the land and coastline a surprise. Wolfe’s Neck Park is a particularly beautiful setting, in winter and summer.

* * *
Kathryn Loup is a transplanted Midwesterner (Michigan mainly), now in Massachusetts. Everything there is so close, she’s trying to visit many different places in New England. You can find her on Tumblr at purekathryn.tumblr.com or more of her photos on Flickr at purekathryn.
Zoom Info
WOLFE’S NECK WOODS STATE PARK - FREEPORT, MAINE
Kathryn Loup is one of those excellent folks who rallied in the waning hours to send in a dispatch from Maine. She reports in for Field Assignment #5 - Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

If you are in Freeport, ME and need a break from the (excellent) shopping there, take a short drive out of town to Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park. The park, situated on Casco Bay, spans over 200 acres with woods and coastline, hiking and cross-country skiing trails, and varied wildlife.
As a relative newcomer to the East Coast, I found the rockiness of the land and coastline a surprise. Wolfe’s Neck Park is a particularly beautiful setting, in winter and summer.

* * *
Kathryn Loup is a transplanted Midwesterner (Michigan mainly), now in Massachusetts. Everything there is so close, she’s trying to visit many different places in New England. You can find her on Tumblr at purekathryn.tumblr.com or more of her photos on Flickr at purekathryn.
Zoom Info

WOLFE’S NECK WOODS STATE PARK - FREEPORT, MAINE

Kathryn Loup is one of those excellent folks who rallied in the waning hours to send in a dispatch from Maine. She reports in for Field Assignment #5 - Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

If you are in Freeport, ME and need a break from the (excellent) shopping there, take a short drive out of town to Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park. The park, situated on Casco Bay, spans over 200 acres with woods and coastline, hiking and cross-country skiing trails, and varied wildlife.

As a relative newcomer to the East Coast, I found the rockiness of the land and coastline a surprise. Wolfe’s Neck Park is a particularly beautiful setting, in winter and summer.

* * *

Kathryn Loup is a transplanted Midwesterner (Michigan mainly), now in Massachusetts. Everything there is so close, she’s trying to visit many different places in New England. You can find her on Tumblr at purekathryn.tumblr.com or more of her photos on Flickr at purekathryn.

THE MOST IMPORTANT NATURAL RESOURCE - MAINE

Maine has well over 2,200 lakes and ponds. Moosehead Lake, about forty miles long and from two to ten miles wide, is one of the country’s largest bodies of fresh water lying wholly within the boundaries of a single State. More than 5,100 rivers and streams appear on the State map; of these, four are navigable for considerable distances into the interior. … The streams of Maine, marked by narrow and rapid currents, and fed by springs and the melting snows of the forest regions, are perhaps the most important natural resource of the State.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

The four seasons of Maine’s beautiful waterways as captured by Corinne for American Guide Week’s Field Assignment #8: 

Maine is the great wilderness of New England. Hiking, camping, fishing, hunting.
Maine is lazy rivers, frigid mountain streams, and getaways to the family cabin at the lake.
Maine is jumping off of rope swings, jumping into piles of leaves, and a slower pace of life.
Maine is greeting your neighbors all by name, borrowing a ladder, bundling up and helping to shovel out after another Nor’ Easter.
Welcome to Maine.

* * *
Corinne is from New England but has been working and adventuring around the southwest for about three years. She’s a wildlife biologist, so her work revolves around hiking, camping, and studying rare wildlife. When she’s not living and working out in the desert, she’s road tripping to visit museums, mountains, and anywhere there is Water. Follow her on Tumblr on c-quoia.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOST IMPORTANT NATURAL RESOURCE - MAINE

Maine has well over 2,200 lakes and ponds. Moosehead Lake, about forty miles long and from two to ten miles wide, is one of the country’s largest bodies of fresh water lying wholly within the boundaries of a single State. More than 5,100 rivers and streams appear on the State map; of these, four are navigable for considerable distances into the interior. … The streams of Maine, marked by narrow and rapid currents, and fed by springs and the melting snows of the forest regions, are perhaps the most important natural resource of the State.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

The four seasons of Maine’s beautiful waterways as captured by Corinne for American Guide Week’s Field Assignment #8: 

Maine is the great wilderness of New England. Hiking, camping, fishing, hunting.
Maine is lazy rivers, frigid mountain streams, and getaways to the family cabin at the lake.
Maine is jumping off of rope swings, jumping into piles of leaves, and a slower pace of life.
Maine is greeting your neighbors all by name, borrowing a ladder, bundling up and helping to shovel out after another Nor’ Easter.
Welcome to Maine.

* * *
Corinne is from New England but has been working and adventuring around the southwest for about three years. She’s a wildlife biologist, so her work revolves around hiking, camping, and studying rare wildlife. When she’s not living and working out in the desert, she’s road tripping to visit museums, mountains, and anywhere there is Water. Follow her on Tumblr on c-quoia.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOST IMPORTANT NATURAL RESOURCE - MAINE

Maine has well over 2,200 lakes and ponds. Moosehead Lake, about forty miles long and from two to ten miles wide, is one of the country’s largest bodies of fresh water lying wholly within the boundaries of a single State. More than 5,100 rivers and streams appear on the State map; of these, four are navigable for considerable distances into the interior. … The streams of Maine, marked by narrow and rapid currents, and fed by springs and the melting snows of the forest regions, are perhaps the most important natural resource of the State.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

The four seasons of Maine’s beautiful waterways as captured by Corinne for American Guide Week’s Field Assignment #8: 

Maine is the great wilderness of New England. Hiking, camping, fishing, hunting.
Maine is lazy rivers, frigid mountain streams, and getaways to the family cabin at the lake.
Maine is jumping off of rope swings, jumping into piles of leaves, and a slower pace of life.
Maine is greeting your neighbors all by name, borrowing a ladder, bundling up and helping to shovel out after another Nor’ Easter.
Welcome to Maine.

* * *
Corinne is from New England but has been working and adventuring around the southwest for about three years. She’s a wildlife biologist, so her work revolves around hiking, camping, and studying rare wildlife. When she’s not living and working out in the desert, she’s road tripping to visit museums, mountains, and anywhere there is Water. Follow her on Tumblr on c-quoia.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOST IMPORTANT NATURAL RESOURCE - MAINE

Maine has well over 2,200 lakes and ponds. Moosehead Lake, about forty miles long and from two to ten miles wide, is one of the country’s largest bodies of fresh water lying wholly within the boundaries of a single State. More than 5,100 rivers and streams appear on the State map; of these, four are navigable for considerable distances into the interior. … The streams of Maine, marked by narrow and rapid currents, and fed by springs and the melting snows of the forest regions, are perhaps the most important natural resource of the State.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

The four seasons of Maine’s beautiful waterways as captured by Corinne for American Guide Week’s Field Assignment #8: 

Maine is the great wilderness of New England. Hiking, camping, fishing, hunting.
Maine is lazy rivers, frigid mountain streams, and getaways to the family cabin at the lake.
Maine is jumping off of rope swings, jumping into piles of leaves, and a slower pace of life.
Maine is greeting your neighbors all by name, borrowing a ladder, bundling up and helping to shovel out after another Nor’ Easter.
Welcome to Maine.

* * *
Corinne is from New England but has been working and adventuring around the southwest for about three years. She’s a wildlife biologist, so her work revolves around hiking, camping, and studying rare wildlife. When she’s not living and working out in the desert, she’s road tripping to visit museums, mountains, and anywhere there is Water. Follow her on Tumblr on c-quoia.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE MOST IMPORTANT NATURAL RESOURCE - MAINE

Maine has well over 2,200 lakes and ponds. Moosehead Lake, about forty miles long and from two to ten miles wide, is one of the country’s largest bodies of fresh water lying wholly within the boundaries of a single State. More than 5,100 rivers and streams appear on the State map; of these, four are navigable for considerable distances into the interior. … The streams of Maine, marked by narrow and rapid currents, and fed by springs and the melting snows of the forest regions, are perhaps the most important natural resource of the State.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

The four seasons of Maine’s beautiful waterways as captured by Corinne for American Guide Week’s Field Assignment #8: 

Maine is the great wilderness of New England. Hiking, camping, fishing, hunting.
Maine is lazy rivers, frigid mountain streams, and getaways to the family cabin at the lake.
Maine is jumping off of rope swings, jumping into piles of leaves, and a slower pace of life.
Maine is greeting your neighbors all by name, borrowing a ladder, bundling up and helping to shovel out after another Nor’ Easter.
Welcome to Maine.

* * *
Corinne is from New England but has been working and adventuring around the southwest for about three years. She’s a wildlife biologist, so her work revolves around hiking, camping, and studying rare wildlife. When she’s not living and working out in the desert, she’s road tripping to visit museums, mountains, and anywhere there is Water. Follow her on Tumblr on c-quoia.tumblr.com.
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THE MOST IMPORTANT NATURAL RESOURCE - MAINE

Maine has well over 2,200 lakes and ponds. Moosehead Lake, about forty miles long and from two to ten miles wide, is one of the country’s largest bodies of fresh water lying wholly within the boundaries of a single State. More than 5,100 rivers and streams appear on the State map; of these, four are navigable for considerable distances into the interior. … The streams of Maine, marked by narrow and rapid currents, and fed by springs and the melting snows of the forest regions, are perhaps the most important natural resource of the State.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

The four seasons of Maine’s beautiful waterways as captured by Corinne for American Guide Week’s Field Assignment #8: 

Maine is the great wilderness of New England. Hiking, camping, fishing, hunting.
Maine is lazy rivers, frigid mountain streams, and getaways to the family cabin at the lake.
Maine is jumping off of rope swings, jumping into piles of leaves, and a slower pace of life.
Maine is greeting your neighbors all by name, borrowing a ladder, bundling up and helping to shovel out after another Nor’ Easter.
Welcome to Maine.

* * *
Corinne is from New England but has been working and adventuring around the southwest for about three years. She’s a wildlife biologist, so her work revolves around hiking, camping, and studying rare wildlife. When she’s not living and working out in the desert, she’s road tripping to visit museums, mountains, and anywhere there is Water. Follow her on Tumblr on c-quoia.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

THE MOST IMPORTANT NATURAL RESOURCE - MAINE

Maine has well over 2,200 lakes and ponds. Moosehead Lake, about forty miles long and from two to ten miles wide, is one of the country’s largest bodies of fresh water lying wholly within the boundaries of a single State. More than 5,100 rivers and streams appear on the State map; of these, four are navigable for considerable distances into the interior. … The streams of Maine, marked by narrow and rapid currents, and fed by springs and the melting snows of the forest regions, are perhaps the most important natural resource of the State.

Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

The four seasons of Maine’s beautiful waterways as captured by Corinne for American Guide Week’s Field Assignment #8

Maine is the great wilderness of New England. Hiking, camping, fishing, hunting.

Maine is lazy rivers, frigid mountain streams, and getaways to the family cabin at the lake.

Maine is jumping off of rope swings, jumping into piles of leaves, and a slower pace of life.

Maine is greeting your neighbors all by name, borrowing a ladder, bundling up and helping to shovel out after another Nor’ Easter.

Welcome to Maine.

* * *

Corinne is from New England but has been working and adventuring around the southwest for about three years. She’s a wildlife biologist, so her work revolves around hiking, camping, and studying rare wildlife. When she’s not living and working out in the desert, she’s road tripping to visit museums, mountains, and anywhere there is Water. Follow her on Tumblr on c-quoia.tumblr.com.