MOTOR CITY VIA MOTOR - DETROIT, MICHIGAN


Here was a new America: a new frontier coming into existence long after the physical frontier had been conquered. Detroit grew as mining towns grow—fast, implosive, and indifferent to the superficial niceties of life. Niceties could wait.
—Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

Jonathan Miller, Your Guide to Detroit, cranks down the driver’s side window and sends this view from Motor City:

Detroit has plenty of room, 139 square miles. The city’s downtown core is roughly 2 square miles (being generous). That leaves 137 square miles of sprawling neighborhoods. Some are intact and thriving, others struggle to hold themselves together, and more then a few have all but completely collapsed. Learning every street could take a lifetime.  Taking frequent drives for work or leisure I always have a camera. I am always trying to find something new, whether a street I’ve never been on or a new scene from streets driven everyday. What better way to see the Motor City then from a car…
Images:
1.Northern edge of downtown Detroit looking south 2.Book Tower, Washington Blvd. 3.Spirit of Detroit, Woodward Ave. 4.Reverend Samuel Francis Smith Flagpole, Belle Isle 5.The Gold Mine Pawn Shop, Gratiot Ave. 6.Near corner of Mitchell and Medbury St., looking toward Incinerator  7.Floral Gardens Flowers, 7 Mile Road 8.Northland Roller Skating, 8 Mile Road 9.Hitsville, Grand Blvd. Detroit, USA

* * *
Jonathan Miller is our Guide to Detroit, the city where he lives and works as a hotel maintenance manager. You know that thing you broke at that hotel, he fixed it. His photography is on tumblr at detroitmaintenanceman and everything else is at his website, detroitmaintenance.
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MOTOR CITY VIA MOTOR - DETROIT, MICHIGAN


Here was a new America: a new frontier coming into existence long after the physical frontier had been conquered. Detroit grew as mining towns grow—fast, implosive, and indifferent to the superficial niceties of life. Niceties could wait.
—Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

Jonathan Miller, Your Guide to Detroit, cranks down the driver’s side window and sends this view from Motor City:

Detroit has plenty of room, 139 square miles. The city’s downtown core is roughly 2 square miles (being generous). That leaves 137 square miles of sprawling neighborhoods. Some are intact and thriving, others struggle to hold themselves together, and more then a few have all but completely collapsed. Learning every street could take a lifetime.  Taking frequent drives for work or leisure I always have a camera. I am always trying to find something new, whether a street I’ve never been on or a new scene from streets driven everyday. What better way to see the Motor City then from a car…
Images:
1.Northern edge of downtown Detroit looking south 2.Book Tower, Washington Blvd. 3.Spirit of Detroit, Woodward Ave. 4.Reverend Samuel Francis Smith Flagpole, Belle Isle 5.The Gold Mine Pawn Shop, Gratiot Ave. 6.Near corner of Mitchell and Medbury St., looking toward Incinerator  7.Floral Gardens Flowers, 7 Mile Road 8.Northland Roller Skating, 8 Mile Road 9.Hitsville, Grand Blvd. Detroit, USA

* * *
Jonathan Miller is our Guide to Detroit, the city where he lives and works as a hotel maintenance manager. You know that thing you broke at that hotel, he fixed it. His photography is on tumblr at detroitmaintenanceman and everything else is at his website, detroitmaintenance.
Zoom Info
MOTOR CITY VIA MOTOR - DETROIT, MICHIGAN


Here was a new America: a new frontier coming into existence long after the physical frontier had been conquered. Detroit grew as mining towns grow—fast, implosive, and indifferent to the superficial niceties of life. Niceties could wait.
—Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

Jonathan Miller, Your Guide to Detroit, cranks down the driver’s side window and sends this view from Motor City:

Detroit has plenty of room, 139 square miles. The city’s downtown core is roughly 2 square miles (being generous). That leaves 137 square miles of sprawling neighborhoods. Some are intact and thriving, others struggle to hold themselves together, and more then a few have all but completely collapsed. Learning every street could take a lifetime.  Taking frequent drives for work or leisure I always have a camera. I am always trying to find something new, whether a street I’ve never been on or a new scene from streets driven everyday. What better way to see the Motor City then from a car…
Images:
1.Northern edge of downtown Detroit looking south 2.Book Tower, Washington Blvd. 3.Spirit of Detroit, Woodward Ave. 4.Reverend Samuel Francis Smith Flagpole, Belle Isle 5.The Gold Mine Pawn Shop, Gratiot Ave. 6.Near corner of Mitchell and Medbury St., looking toward Incinerator  7.Floral Gardens Flowers, 7 Mile Road 8.Northland Roller Skating, 8 Mile Road 9.Hitsville, Grand Blvd. Detroit, USA

* * *
Jonathan Miller is our Guide to Detroit, the city where he lives and works as a hotel maintenance manager. You know that thing you broke at that hotel, he fixed it. His photography is on tumblr at detroitmaintenanceman and everything else is at his website, detroitmaintenance.
Zoom Info

MOTOR CITY VIA MOTOR - DETROIT, MICHIGAN

Here was a new America: a new frontier coming into existence long after the physical frontier had been conquered. Detroit grew as mining towns grow—fast, implosive, and indifferent to the superficial niceties of life. Niceties could wait.

Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

Jonathan Miller, Your Guide to Detroit, cranks down the driver’s side window and sends this view from Motor City:

Detroit has plenty of room, 139 square miles. The city’s downtown core is roughly 2 square miles (being generous). That leaves 137 square miles of sprawling neighborhoods. Some are intact and thriving, others struggle to hold themselves together, and more then a few have all but completely collapsed. Learning every street could take a lifetime. 

Taking frequent drives for work or leisure I always have a camera. I am always trying to find something new, whether a street I’ve never been on or a new scene from streets driven everyday. What better way to see the Motor City then from a car…

Images:

1.Northern edge of downtown Detroit looking south
2.Book Tower, Washington Blvd.
3.Spirit of Detroit, Woodward Ave.
4.Reverend Samuel Francis Smith Flagpole, Belle Isle
5.The Gold Mine Pawn Shop, Gratiot Ave.
6.Near corner of Mitchell and Medbury St., looking toward Incinerator 
7.Floral Gardens Flowers, 7 Mile Road
8.Northland Roller Skating, 8 Mile Road
9.Hitsville, Grand Blvd. Detroit, USA

* * *

Jonathan Miller is our Guide to Detroit, the city where he lives and works as a hotel maintenance manager. You know that thing you broke at that hotel, he fixed it. His photography is on tumblr at detroitmaintenanceman and everything else is at his website, detroitmaintenance.

SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN
Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013
The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.
But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014. 
* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SOO LOCKS ENGINEERS DAY - SAULT STE. MARIE, MICHIGAN

Matthew Ault contributes a fantastic photo essay and write-up for both Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, pageants, celebrations and customs and for Field Assignment #8 - Waterways.  

The John D. Leitch passing through the Poe Lock.
Soo Locks Engineers Day, June 28, 2013

The Soo Locks are a key component in the waterway that connects Lake Superior ports of the U.S. and Canada to the industrial centers of the lower Great Lakes and, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, to the world beyond.  The locks raise and lower upbound and downbound ships 21 feet, bypassing the rapids of the St. Mary’s River which flows from Lake Superior to Lake Huron.  Visitors to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, can view the locks, learn of their history, and watch the ships pass through from a 3-story viewing platform.  The locks pass an average of 10,000 ships a year, so you have a good chance of seeing one or more on any given day.  The views of these massive vessels as they pass by at such close proximity are stunning.

But on the 4th Friday of June each year, the Army Corps of Engineers, that runs the locks, opens the grounds even further for Engineer’s Day.  For that one day, visitors can walk out across the lock gates themselves, and visit the grounds and buildings between the locks that are normally off limits to the public.  Ships continue passing through during the event, and visitors are given an even closer view of the operations.  They may even get to exchange greetings with the ships’ crewmen.

The next Engineers Day will take place on June 27, 2014

* * *

Matthew Ault is a lifelong Michigander who currently resides in Brandon Township, Michigan. Follow his work on Tumblr at maa-pix.tumblr.com.

EASTERN MARKET - DETROIT, MICHIGAN

Detroit has little of the quaint, the bizarre, the picturesque. A few places and events might qualify, such as the Gypsy restaurants in Delray to the south, the Eastern Market (one of the few places in the city where horses are seen after daybreak), and the carnival on Paradise Valley’s Hastings Street after a Joe Louis victory.
—Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

While there are no longer be post-dawn horses roaming the streets of Detroit’s Eastern Market, it’s still a major hub of wholesale and retail food commerce. In the midst of the Eastern Market district is the market itself—six blocks of produce, meat and condiment sales that have been around since 1891.
Guide note:The Detroit Eastern Market is open every Saturday from 6am to 4pm and on Tuesdays (July-October) from 9am to 3pm. In 2013, they will be hosting a special Thanksgiving Market on Tuesday, November 26.
* * *
This photo dispatch arrived courtesy of frnchtoast.tumblr.com. 
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EASTERN MARKET - DETROIT, MICHIGAN

Detroit has little of the quaint, the bizarre, the picturesque. A few places and events might qualify, such as the Gypsy restaurants in Delray to the south, the Eastern Market (one of the few places in the city where horses are seen after daybreak), and the carnival on Paradise Valley’s Hastings Street after a Joe Louis victory.
—Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

While there are no longer be post-dawn horses roaming the streets of Detroit’s Eastern Market, it’s still a major hub of wholesale and retail food commerce. In the midst of the Eastern Market district is the market itself—six blocks of produce, meat and condiment sales that have been around since 1891.
Guide note:The Detroit Eastern Market is open every Saturday from 6am to 4pm and on Tuesdays (July-October) from 9am to 3pm. In 2013, they will be hosting a special Thanksgiving Market on Tuesday, November 26.
* * *
This photo dispatch arrived courtesy of frnchtoast.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info

EASTERN MARKET - DETROIT, MICHIGAN

Detroit has little of the quaint, the bizarre, the picturesque. A few places and events might qualify, such as the Gypsy restaurants in Delray to the south, the Eastern Market (one of the few places in the city where horses are seen after daybreak), and the carnival on Paradise Valley’s Hastings Street after a Joe Louis victory.

Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

While there are no longer be post-dawn horses roaming the streets of Detroit’s Eastern Market, it’s still a major hub of wholesale and retail food commerce. In the midst of the Eastern Market district is the market itself—six blocks of produce, meat and condiment sales that have been around since 1891.

Guide note:The Detroit Eastern Market is open every Saturday from 6am to 4pm and on Tuesdays (July-October) from 9am to 3pm. In 2013, they will be hosting a special Thanksgiving Market on Tuesday, November 26.

* * *

This photo dispatch arrived courtesy of frnchtoast.tumblr.com. 

MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
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MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
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MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).
—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *
James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 
Zoom Info

MICHIGAN CAMPING

Camping: North of the Bay City-Muskegon line, which substantially divides the agricultural and industrial lower half of the Lower Peninsula from the recreational upper half, are areas totaling 15,000,000 acres of wild land suitable for any kind of camping. In these vast stretches — thinly populated but dotted with many small communities that exist more or less as trading headquarters for the surrounding areas — are camps that range from palatial summer homes to evergreen-bough lean-tos constructed by woodsmen for overnight stops. Between these extremes are numerous areas under State and Federal control, which contain campsites. These facilities are often in isolated districts and can be located only through inquiry in the territory… Woolen underwear, heavy suiting, overcoats, overshoes, scarfs, and gloves should be worn (in colder seasons).

—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

James Bernal sends word from the hinterlands of Michigan for Field Assignment #1 — Topography & Climate, with an update on how to camp in the Wolverine State. James writes:

Bring roman candles, throwing knives, a BB gun, BBs, PBRs, a slingshot and a Beagle/Labrador mix when headed to Middle-of-Nowhere, Michigan, for the weekend.

* * *

James Bernal is Colombian-American, grew up in Miami, moved around some and, most recently, settled in Chicago. Follow on JamesBernal.com and see his videos on Vimeo as he does his part in “documenting this giant-ass country we live in.” 

THE SHORE PROJECT - STATION TO STATION

I am hoping to find all of the locations that Stephen Shore photographed during the 1970s for his book Uncommon Places. I am doing this because it is fun and exciting to follow in the footsteps of someone I admire. I started this project, as many before me probably have, expecting that each location would look absolutely different than it did 30 (+) years ago in the photograph… After my first two road trips I was pleasantly surprised to find that there were still some remnants from the 1970s (the light fixtures, a rusty chain link fence, etc.). While I am searching for these sites, I am also searching for the change in our American landscape.

Editor’s note: Find more at The Shore Project and at Station To Station.

* * *

Brittany Marcoux is a Guide to Rhode Island and an At-Large Guide to New England for The American Guide. She’s a photographer and a native New Englander. Follow her work on Tumblr or via her website.

* * *

THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Artists: Stephen Shore & Brittany Marcoux. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]  

HANDLE WITH CARE - DETROIT, MICHIGAN


There is drama in Detroit: …the drama of change and never-ending readjustments to fluctuating social and economic conditions. There is hope in Detroit, for, with all its youth and the impatience born of youth, it is willing to make mistakes, to experiment on a tremendous scale both within and without its factories…It has strength and it has power: …the power of willing hands, eager to work 
—Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)


so detroit is bankrupt. everyone has an opinion on how or why it happened. everyone seems to have their own idea on how to fix it (stay away from the art at the Detroit Institute of Arts. it’s not for sale). i could even go on with my hows and whys, but i think this picture says all that i really have to say about it.
* * *
Jonathan Miller is our Guide to Detroit, the city where he lives and works as a hotel maintenance manager. You know that thing you broke at that hotel, he fixed it. His photography is on tumblr at detroitmaintenanceman and everything else is at his website, detroitmaintenance.
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HANDLE WITH CARE - DETROIT, MICHIGAN

There is drama in Detroit: …the drama of change and never-ending readjustments to fluctuating social and economic conditions. There is hope in Detroit, for, with all its youth and the impatience born of youth, it is willing to make mistakes, to experiment on a tremendous scale both within and without its factories…It has strength and it has power: …the power of willing hands, eager to work 

Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

so detroit is bankrupt. everyone has an opinion on how or why it happened. everyone seems to have their own idea on how to fix it (stay away from the art at the Detroit Institute of Arts. it’s not for sale). i could even go on with my hows and whys, but i think this picture says all that i really have to say about it.

* * *

Jonathan Miller is our Guide to Detroit, the city where he lives and works as a hotel maintenance manager. You know that thing you broke at that hotel, he fixed it. His photography is on tumblr at detroitmaintenanceman and everything else is at his website, detroitmaintenance.

CROSSROADS VILLAGE - FLINT, MICHIGAN
Crossroads Village in Flint, Michigan is a collection of over 35 historic structures from the late 1800s, including churches, an opera house, a carousel and ferris wheel, homes and a 120-year-old train. The buildings have been brought specifically to live out the rest of their days at the Village, creating a living museum.
Christmas is quite a big deal there: a variety of decorations and lights arrayed throughout the buildings, Christmas music played in the opera house, crafts assembled in the schoolhouse and daily visits from Santa. It’s the tradition of many Michigan families to make a pilgrimage in their snow boots and gloves to ride the 40-minute train ride or see the Christmas Carol play in the opera house, my family included.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
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CROSSROADS VILLAGE - FLINT, MICHIGAN
Crossroads Village in Flint, Michigan is a collection of over 35 historic structures from the late 1800s, including churches, an opera house, a carousel and ferris wheel, homes and a 120-year-old train. The buildings have been brought specifically to live out the rest of their days at the Village, creating a living museum.
Christmas is quite a big deal there: a variety of decorations and lights arrayed throughout the buildings, Christmas music played in the opera house, crafts assembled in the schoolhouse and daily visits from Santa. It’s the tradition of many Michigan families to make a pilgrimage in their snow boots and gloves to ride the 40-minute train ride or see the Christmas Carol play in the opera house, my family included.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
CROSSROADS VILLAGE - FLINT, MICHIGAN
Crossroads Village in Flint, Michigan is a collection of over 35 historic structures from the late 1800s, including churches, an opera house, a carousel and ferris wheel, homes and a 120-year-old train. The buildings have been brought specifically to live out the rest of their days at the Village, creating a living museum.
Christmas is quite a big deal there: a variety of decorations and lights arrayed throughout the buildings, Christmas music played in the opera house, crafts assembled in the schoolhouse and daily visits from Santa. It’s the tradition of many Michigan families to make a pilgrimage in their snow boots and gloves to ride the 40-minute train ride or see the Christmas Carol play in the opera house, my family included.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
CROSSROADS VILLAGE - FLINT, MICHIGAN
Crossroads Village in Flint, Michigan is a collection of over 35 historic structures from the late 1800s, including churches, an opera house, a carousel and ferris wheel, homes and a 120-year-old train. The buildings have been brought specifically to live out the rest of their days at the Village, creating a living museum.
Christmas is quite a big deal there: a variety of decorations and lights arrayed throughout the buildings, Christmas music played in the opera house, crafts assembled in the schoolhouse and daily visits from Santa. It’s the tradition of many Michigan families to make a pilgrimage in their snow boots and gloves to ride the 40-minute train ride or see the Christmas Carol play in the opera house, my family included.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
CROSSROADS VILLAGE - FLINT, MICHIGAN
Crossroads Village in Flint, Michigan is a collection of over 35 historic structures from the late 1800s, including churches, an opera house, a carousel and ferris wheel, homes and a 120-year-old train. The buildings have been brought specifically to live out the rest of their days at the Village, creating a living museum.
Christmas is quite a big deal there: a variety of decorations and lights arrayed throughout the buildings, Christmas music played in the opera house, crafts assembled in the schoolhouse and daily visits from Santa. It’s the tradition of many Michigan families to make a pilgrimage in their snow boots and gloves to ride the 40-minute train ride or see the Christmas Carol play in the opera house, my family included.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
CROSSROADS VILLAGE - FLINT, MICHIGAN
Crossroads Village in Flint, Michigan is a collection of over 35 historic structures from the late 1800s, including churches, an opera house, a carousel and ferris wheel, homes and a 120-year-old train. The buildings have been brought specifically to live out the rest of their days at the Village, creating a living museum.
Christmas is quite a big deal there: a variety of decorations and lights arrayed throughout the buildings, Christmas music played in the opera house, crafts assembled in the schoolhouse and daily visits from Santa. It’s the tradition of many Michigan families to make a pilgrimage in their snow boots and gloves to ride the 40-minute train ride or see the Christmas Carol play in the opera house, my family included.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
CROSSROADS VILLAGE - FLINT, MICHIGAN
Crossroads Village in Flint, Michigan is a collection of over 35 historic structures from the late 1800s, including churches, an opera house, a carousel and ferris wheel, homes and a 120-year-old train. The buildings have been brought specifically to live out the rest of their days at the Village, creating a living museum.
Christmas is quite a big deal there: a variety of decorations and lights arrayed throughout the buildings, Christmas music played in the opera house, crafts assembled in the schoolhouse and daily visits from Santa. It’s the tradition of many Michigan families to make a pilgrimage in their snow boots and gloves to ride the 40-minute train ride or see the Christmas Carol play in the opera house, my family included.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
CROSSROADS VILLAGE - FLINT, MICHIGAN
Crossroads Village in Flint, Michigan is a collection of over 35 historic structures from the late 1800s, including churches, an opera house, a carousel and ferris wheel, homes and a 120-year-old train. The buildings have been brought specifically to live out the rest of their days at the Village, creating a living museum.
Christmas is quite a big deal there: a variety of decorations and lights arrayed throughout the buildings, Christmas music played in the opera house, crafts assembled in the schoolhouse and daily visits from Santa. It’s the tradition of many Michigan families to make a pilgrimage in their snow boots and gloves to ride the 40-minute train ride or see the Christmas Carol play in the opera house, my family included.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info

CROSSROADS VILLAGE - FLINT, MICHIGAN

Crossroads Village in Flint, Michigan is a collection of over 35 historic structures from the late 1800s, including churches, an opera house, a carousel and ferris wheel, homes and a 120-year-old train. The buildings have been brought specifically to live out the rest of their days at the Village, creating a living museum.

Christmas is quite a big deal there: a variety of decorations and lights arrayed throughout the buildings, Christmas music played in the opera house, crafts assembled in the schoolhouse and daily visits from Santa. It’s the tradition of many Michigan families to make a pilgrimage in their snow boots and gloves to ride the 40-minute train ride or see the Christmas Carol play in the opera house, my family included.

* * *

EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.

ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
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ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 
In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.
Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.
Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”
This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 
The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info

ROLLWAYS SUMMER HOME GROUP - H4, HURON NATIONAL FOREST - HALE, MICHIGAN 

In the late 1800s, the state of Michigan was cleared out of the towering, magnificent trees that covered its lands for lumber. The “Rollways” referred to a particularly important aspect of the logging near the Au Sable River. Banked by steep hills on either side in many areas of the 138-mile stretch, the river was a valuable tool in allowing recently logged trees to be rolled down the banks and into the water, floating them onwards to Lake Huron to be gathered or shipped to further destinations.

Decades later in 1933, as a part of the Works Progress Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps was formed to provide jobs to unemployed and unwed men from the ages of 18 to 25. These men were assigned the task of restoring federal land throughout the country, including the area now known as the Huron-Manistee National Forest. This forest included “The Rollways” area and much of the Au Sable River. The CCC built bridges, formed campgrounds and re-planted the forests that had been wiped out by the logging boom. More trees were planted in Michigan during the operating time of the CCC—nearly 485 million—than in any other state.

Today, sprinkled throughout the Huron-Manistee National Forest are the Summer Home Groups, which were originally built for and by the CCC to house workers or to function as summer vacation homes operated by the Federal government. They now are privately owned cabins in clusters of “Home Groups.”

This particular group, H4, has around 12 cabins of varying amenities. The structures are in a loop on the south side of the Au Sable River and nestled amongst the trees planted by the CCC in “The Rollways” area of the forest. All cabins can only be used for six months out of the year—none of them are permanent residences. While the cabins are privately owned, the land they are on is still the National Forest and is therefore leased out by the Federal government to each cabin owner in 10 year increments. 

The structures and the forest itself stand as legacy and testament to the men of the CCC.

* * *

EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.

FRANKENMUTH, MICHIGAN

A German settlement known throughout the State for its chicken dinners, served harvester style, and its Frankenmuth beer. It was settled in 1845 by a group of Franconians from Bavaria and, later, by refugees from the unsuccessful German revolution of 1848.

The neat village, spread out for some distance, has retained its German flavor; most of the inhabitants are descendants of the original settlers and speak the German language.

—Michigan: A Guide to the Wolverine State (WPA,1941)

Postcard Key:

1. Maypole 2-4. Frankenmuth Bavarian Inn 5. The Fischer Opera Haus 6. Schnitzelbank Shop 7. Bavarian Festival 8. Bodenbender’s Apfel Haus 9. Bronner’s 10. The Edelweiss Trio

* * *

Jordan Smith is the guide to ephemeral America for The American Guide. He currently works for the University of Notre Dame during the day and scans at night. He lives in South Bend, Indiana and you can find him on Flickr, his blog, or one of several Tumblr sites.

HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.
— Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.
Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.
Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
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HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.
— Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.
Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.
Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.
— Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.
Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.
Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.
— Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.
Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.
Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.
— Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.
Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.
Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.
— Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.
Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.
Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.
— Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.
Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.
Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.
— Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.
Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.
Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.
— Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.
Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.
Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info

HOLLY, MICHIGAN (ANYTOWN, USA)

Left from Fenton on State 87 is HOLLY, 5 m. (980 alt., 2,252 pop.), a small industrial city with some regional fame as a flower center. Flower gardening, encouraged by the Holly Flower Lovers’ Club, is a feature of the civic program.

Michigan, A Guide To the Wolverine State (WPA, 1941)

The town I grew up in was always quiet. It was always small and it always seemed as if it was about 20 years behind. Fifty miles north of Detroit, it was one of hundreds of other small towns that had auto and factory workers looking to live with their families away from the more traditional suburban spread of identical factory-produced homes and packed strip malls. The homes were old, but well kept. The businesses were small, but frequented by the people who lived there, grew up there and raised their kids there. By all definable standards Holly, Michigan was a thriving small town.

Not unlike the rest of the state of Michigan, Holly has been hit hard by the auto industry crash, as well as the general weak economy of the state. People have lost their homes, businesses have closed. Walking down the main through road that runs north and south within the town, Holly looks like it has literally stood still. Each time I go back to visit, I’m further saddened by the continuing spreading emptiness.

Holly, unfortunately, is not unlike a million other towns in the U.S. It’s actually totally average. Although I’d like to think the town of my childhood and the town I love so dearly is beyond being categorized as average, it really is Anytown, USA.

* * *

EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.