THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
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THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI
Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.
Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.
Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)
What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.
Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info

THE APRON MUSEUM - IUKA, MISSISSIPPI

Aprons have always been a backdrop in the culture of the kitchen. Mostly worn by women, aprons have evolved to provide people all over the world with a layer of protection against mess and dirt. Aprons are used in food service, carpentry work, the medical field, hair salons, construction and even mechanical work. There is not much history known about the origin of the apron. Paintings dating back to the 1300s depict women in aprons, but we really don’t know precisely when and where the apron was invented.

Since 2006, Carolyn Terry of Iuka, Mississippi has owned and curated the world’s only apron museum. With over 3,000 aprons, she is proud to explain where some of her most prized collections have come from. Estate sales, donations, and her private collection cover the walls and racks of the right side of the store. On the left side, aprons and vintage collectables are for sale starting as low as $3.00. Each apron has it origin and date received on it for collecting purposes.

Carolyn is most proud of her Claudia McGraw aprons. Claudia, from Black Mountain, North Carolins, had a popular tea room where she hung some of her hand made aprons on the wall. Within hours of hanging them they all sold. She became one of the most popular apron makers in history providing aprons for Greta Garbo, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Vanderbilt and many others. (Searching online for a Claudia McGraw biography is not easy.)

What makes the mystery of the apron so interesting is how the information is found only through talking to an apron enthusiast. If you Wikipedia apron you don’t get a historical account, timeline or specifics.

Stories passed down through generations and memories are what we have as origins for this piece of clothing known as an apron.

* * *

Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.

MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Bridges are the best. The fantastic This Belongs In a Museum checks in for American Guide Week for Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

We interrupt our regularly scheduled guest posts, so I can write a submission of my own for American Guide Week. One of the questions in the original 1935 manual for the American Guide series of books asks for interesting landmarks in your district. Considering I live in Chicagoland and this is a blog about museums, let me tell you about the Michigan Avenue Bridge:
Did you know Chicago has more moveable bridges than any other city in the world? There are 37 in total, including 18 along the Chicago River’s main branch. This is something I learned (and that consumed my life) when I briefly worked at the McCormick Bridgehouse & Chicago River Museum, which is located inside one of the Michigan Avenue bridge tender houses. 
Beginning at river level and spiraling five stories up, the museum tells the story of the Chicago River and the inner workings of the bridge with somewhat static exhibits (it’s more information center than anything with no “real” objects on display). Believe it or not, the Michigan Avenue Bridge is the first double-deck, double-leaf trunnion bascule bridge ever built. Bascule means “seesaw” in French, which is how this bridge operates. With just two 108-horsepower motors, the bridge’s steel and roadway weigh the same as the concrete and steel counterweight. Museum visitors can access the bridge’s gear room to see this engineering marvel. During the spring and fall, scheduled bridge lifts show the bridge gears in operation as the leaves are raised and lowered. And at the very top of the bridgehouse, visitors are treated to magnificent 360 degree views of the city and river. But the museum is teeny tiny as it cannot fit more than 34 people at a time. Let’s just say I wouldn’t want to live inside one of these buildings.
Conceived as part of Daniel Burnham's 1909 Plan of Chicago, the bridge was designed to improve both the city's transportation and riverfront. Its construction between 1918 and 1920 led to the development of North Michigan Avenue as the city's premier thoroughfare. The bridge, measuring just under 400 feet (122 meters) and featuring two levels for cars and pedestrians, was listed as an official Chicago Landmark in 1991.

* * *
This Belongs In a Museum was once called the “Stephen Fry of Museum Blogging.” Written by a frustrated museologist, it’s dedicated to the small, random museums and weird attractions of the world. Always informative, usually funny, sometimes offensive - follow on Tumblr at thisbelongsinamuseum.tumblr.com and on Twitter at @inamuseum.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Bridges are the best. The fantastic This Belongs In a Museum checks in for American Guide Week for Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

We interrupt our regularly scheduled guest posts, so I can write a submission of my own for American Guide Week. One of the questions in the original 1935 manual for the American Guide series of books asks for interesting landmarks in your district. Considering I live in Chicagoland and this is a blog about museums, let me tell you about the Michigan Avenue Bridge:
Did you know Chicago has more moveable bridges than any other city in the world? There are 37 in total, including 18 along the Chicago River’s main branch. This is something I learned (and that consumed my life) when I briefly worked at the McCormick Bridgehouse & Chicago River Museum, which is located inside one of the Michigan Avenue bridge tender houses. 
Beginning at river level and spiraling five stories up, the museum tells the story of the Chicago River and the inner workings of the bridge with somewhat static exhibits (it’s more information center than anything with no “real” objects on display). Believe it or not, the Michigan Avenue Bridge is the first double-deck, double-leaf trunnion bascule bridge ever built. Bascule means “seesaw” in French, which is how this bridge operates. With just two 108-horsepower motors, the bridge’s steel and roadway weigh the same as the concrete and steel counterweight. Museum visitors can access the bridge’s gear room to see this engineering marvel. During the spring and fall, scheduled bridge lifts show the bridge gears in operation as the leaves are raised and lowered. And at the very top of the bridgehouse, visitors are treated to magnificent 360 degree views of the city and river. But the museum is teeny tiny as it cannot fit more than 34 people at a time. Let’s just say I wouldn’t want to live inside one of these buildings.
Conceived as part of Daniel Burnham's 1909 Plan of Chicago, the bridge was designed to improve both the city's transportation and riverfront. Its construction between 1918 and 1920 led to the development of North Michigan Avenue as the city's premier thoroughfare. The bridge, measuring just under 400 feet (122 meters) and featuring two levels for cars and pedestrians, was listed as an official Chicago Landmark in 1991.

* * *
This Belongs In a Museum was once called the “Stephen Fry of Museum Blogging.” Written by a frustrated museologist, it’s dedicated to the small, random museums and weird attractions of the world. Always informative, usually funny, sometimes offensive - follow on Tumblr at thisbelongsinamuseum.tumblr.com and on Twitter at @inamuseum.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Bridges are the best. The fantastic This Belongs In a Museum checks in for American Guide Week for Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

We interrupt our regularly scheduled guest posts, so I can write a submission of my own for American Guide Week. One of the questions in the original 1935 manual for the American Guide series of books asks for interesting landmarks in your district. Considering I live in Chicagoland and this is a blog about museums, let me tell you about the Michigan Avenue Bridge:
Did you know Chicago has more moveable bridges than any other city in the world? There are 37 in total, including 18 along the Chicago River’s main branch. This is something I learned (and that consumed my life) when I briefly worked at the McCormick Bridgehouse & Chicago River Museum, which is located inside one of the Michigan Avenue bridge tender houses. 
Beginning at river level and spiraling five stories up, the museum tells the story of the Chicago River and the inner workings of the bridge with somewhat static exhibits (it’s more information center than anything with no “real” objects on display). Believe it or not, the Michigan Avenue Bridge is the first double-deck, double-leaf trunnion bascule bridge ever built. Bascule means “seesaw” in French, which is how this bridge operates. With just two 108-horsepower motors, the bridge’s steel and roadway weigh the same as the concrete and steel counterweight. Museum visitors can access the bridge’s gear room to see this engineering marvel. During the spring and fall, scheduled bridge lifts show the bridge gears in operation as the leaves are raised and lowered. And at the very top of the bridgehouse, visitors are treated to magnificent 360 degree views of the city and river. But the museum is teeny tiny as it cannot fit more than 34 people at a time. Let’s just say I wouldn’t want to live inside one of these buildings.
Conceived as part of Daniel Burnham's 1909 Plan of Chicago, the bridge was designed to improve both the city's transportation and riverfront. Its construction between 1918 and 1920 led to the development of North Michigan Avenue as the city's premier thoroughfare. The bridge, measuring just under 400 feet (122 meters) and featuring two levels for cars and pedestrians, was listed as an official Chicago Landmark in 1991.

* * *
This Belongs In a Museum was once called the “Stephen Fry of Museum Blogging.” Written by a frustrated museologist, it’s dedicated to the small, random museums and weird attractions of the world. Always informative, usually funny, sometimes offensive - follow on Tumblr at thisbelongsinamuseum.tumblr.com and on Twitter at @inamuseum.
Zoom Info
MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Bridges are the best. The fantastic This Belongs In a Museum checks in for American Guide Week for Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

We interrupt our regularly scheduled guest posts, so I can write a submission of my own for American Guide Week. One of the questions in the original 1935 manual for the American Guide series of books asks for interesting landmarks in your district. Considering I live in Chicagoland and this is a blog about museums, let me tell you about the Michigan Avenue Bridge:
Did you know Chicago has more moveable bridges than any other city in the world? There are 37 in total, including 18 along the Chicago River’s main branch. This is something I learned (and that consumed my life) when I briefly worked at the McCormick Bridgehouse & Chicago River Museum, which is located inside one of the Michigan Avenue bridge tender houses. 
Beginning at river level and spiraling five stories up, the museum tells the story of the Chicago River and the inner workings of the bridge with somewhat static exhibits (it’s more information center than anything with no “real” objects on display). Believe it or not, the Michigan Avenue Bridge is the first double-deck, double-leaf trunnion bascule bridge ever built. Bascule means “seesaw” in French, which is how this bridge operates. With just two 108-horsepower motors, the bridge’s steel and roadway weigh the same as the concrete and steel counterweight. Museum visitors can access the bridge’s gear room to see this engineering marvel. During the spring and fall, scheduled bridge lifts show the bridge gears in operation as the leaves are raised and lowered. And at the very top of the bridgehouse, visitors are treated to magnificent 360 degree views of the city and river. But the museum is teeny tiny as it cannot fit more than 34 people at a time. Let’s just say I wouldn’t want to live inside one of these buildings.
Conceived as part of Daniel Burnham's 1909 Plan of Chicago, the bridge was designed to improve both the city's transportation and riverfront. Its construction between 1918 and 1920 led to the development of North Michigan Avenue as the city's premier thoroughfare. The bridge, measuring just under 400 feet (122 meters) and featuring two levels for cars and pedestrians, was listed as an official Chicago Landmark in 1991.

* * *
This Belongs In a Museum was once called the “Stephen Fry of Museum Blogging.” Written by a frustrated museologist, it’s dedicated to the small, random museums and weird attractions of the world. Always informative, usually funny, sometimes offensive - follow on Tumblr at thisbelongsinamuseum.tumblr.com and on Twitter at @inamuseum.
Zoom Info

MICHIGAN AVENUE BRIDGE - CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Bridges are the best. The fantastic This Belongs In a Museum checks in for American Guide Week for Field Assignment #5 - National Parks, Monuments and Landmarks:

We interrupt our regularly scheduled guest posts, so I can write a submission of my own for American Guide Week. One of the questions in the original 1935 manual for the American Guide series of books asks for interesting landmarks in your district. Considering I live in Chicagoland and this is a blog about museums, let me tell you about the Michigan Avenue Bridge:

Did you know Chicago has more moveable bridges than any other city in the world? There are 37 in total, including 18 along the Chicago River’s main branch. This is something I learned (and that consumed my life) when I briefly worked at the McCormick Bridgehouse & Chicago River Museum, which is located inside one of the Michigan Avenue bridge tender houses. 

Beginning at river level and spiraling five stories up, the museum tells the story of the Chicago River and the inner workings of the bridge with somewhat static exhibits (it’s more information center than anything with no “real” objects on display). Believe it or not, the Michigan Avenue Bridge is the first double-deck, double-leaf trunnion bascule bridge ever built. Bascule means “seesaw” in French, which is how this bridge operates. With just two 108-horsepower motors, the bridge’s steel and roadway weigh the same as the concrete and steel counterweight. Museum visitors can access the bridge’s gear room to see this engineering marvel. During the spring and fall, scheduled bridge lifts show the bridge gears in operation as the leaves are raised and lowered. And at the very top of the bridgehouse, visitors are treated to magnificent 360 degree views of the city and river. But the museum is teeny tiny as it cannot fit more than 34 people at a time. Let’s just say I wouldn’t want to live inside one of these buildings.

Conceived as part of Daniel Burnham's 1909 Plan of Chicago, the bridge was designed to improve both the city's transportation and riverfront. Its construction between 1918 and 1920 led to the development of North Michigan Avenue as the city's premier thoroughfare. The bridge, measuring just under 400 feet (122 meters) and featuring two levels for cars and pedestrians, was listed as an official Chicago Landmark in 1991.

* * *

This Belongs In a Museum was once called the “Stephen Fry of Museum Blogging.” Written by a frustrated museologist, it’s dedicated to the small, random museums and weird attractions of the world. Always informative, usually funny, sometimes offensive - follow on Tumblr at thisbelongsinamuseum.tumblr.com and on Twitter at @inamuseum.

MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
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MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 
A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.
The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.
The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.
Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.
At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966.  
Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.
Guide Notes:
Mesa Verde National Park
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

MESA VERDE NATIONAL PARK - SOUTHWEST COLORADO 

A visit to Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado is a trip into two very different historical periods.  With over 4,000 Ancestral Puebloan archaeological sites, including the famous cliff dwellings, Mesa Verde has been recognized as one of the world’s premier archeological destinations since before it became a national park in 1906.  But the park got a great deal of its charm and infrastructure in 1933-1942, when it hosted a Civilian Conservation Corp camp as part of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.

The CCC transformed the rustic park into what it is today.  They built roads, fought fires, landscaped, saved trees from insect and porcupine infestations, and built the infrastructure that is still in use.  One of the most beloved projects left from their time at Mesa Verde is the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum near the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling.

The museum, though a little worn around the edges, is a time warp of Art Deco/Great Depression era beauty.  The centerpiece is the dioramas.  Built with the hope that they “will enable thousands of park visitors to visualize ancient life and people as they existed in those early days and be able to view the ruins with better understanding and greater appreciation,”  five dioramas were in place by 1939.  They depict daily life during five different periods between 13,000 BC and 1200 AD.

Each display is four by five feet and four feet deep.  Every item inside was handmade, down to the tiny pot shards and rocks.  The figures are made from beeswax and balsam wood (around the scale of a Star Wars action figure).  The Step House diorama alone took eight CCC men more than 1,100 hours of work.

At the beginning of this summer, Mesa Verde held the official grand opening of a new 23,620 square foot visitor and research center.  The new visitor center has its own displays of life-sized dioramas, and replaces the Far View Visitors Center that was built as part of the Mission 66 plan to expand visitor services throughout the national park system by 1966. 

Many people were concerned that this current round of park updates would spell the end of the Chapin Mesa Museum.  Happily, even the National Park Service understands the beauty and historical significance of the site and chose to leave the museum as it is.

Guide Notes:

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
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WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info
WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI
A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.
If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.
Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)
Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.
Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.
Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)
Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too
“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod
* * *
Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.
Zoom Info

WHERE ELVIS NEVER SLEEPS - HOLLY SPRINGS, MISSISSIPPI

A milestone for a normal person might be getting married or having a kid. For me, it’s becoming a lifetime member at Graceland Too in Holly Springs, Mississippi.

Approximately 50 miles from the real Graceland, in the heart of downtown Holly Springs, sits Paul MacLeod’s Graceland Too. He repeatedly touts that his goal is to resemble Graceland, not copy it; and for only $5 anyone, AT ANY TIME (24 hours a day even), can take a tour of Paul’s house. Paul says it’s been visited by over 500,000 people, including many famous actors with the most recent being Ashton Kutcher. (Although I’m fairly certain that’s the same sentence he told me when I last visited over 4 years ago). If you can believe it, Muhammad Ali has been three times as well as Steven Seagal.

If Graceland were on acid it might resemble Graceland Too. Paul is the most extreme Elvis fanatic in the world. I could say this with the utmost of confidence even if I had no idea who Elvis was.

Who else has a closet filled with thousands of Reader’s Digests with paper clips bound on each page where Elvis is mentioned? A notebook with hundreds of TV scripts—each only special because Elvis was spoken of? (I opened a Full House script where lovable Uncle Jesse was Elvis for Halloween.)

Paul has over 32,000 notes about Elvis being mentioned on TV. That’s nothing if you’ve seen his backyard: it’s been completely transformed into “Jailhouse Rock”—how Paul sees “Jailhouse Rock”—a visitor favorite being the electric chair.

Paul is an elusive guy. He’ll explain at the beginning of every tour how he found $750,000 in the trunk of his Cadillac (he seems to find lots of money) and decided to follow his dream of collecting Elvis memorabilia. He was married and had a son, Elvis Aaron Presley MacLeod. His wife gave him an ultimatum: Her or Elvis, so he gave the Misses “a million dollars” and told her to hit the road.

Being my third visit, I got to take my photo with a pink guitar, belt and leather jacket in front of Paul’s Elvis shrine. I also recieved my own lifetime membership card to Graceland Too. Each visit is now free for me. (Paul said if I lose the card it will cost me $5, which sounds fair enough.)

Every lifetime member’s photo goes up on Paul’s wall. I’m up there now, too

“Dreams Come True At Graceland Too” — Paul MacLeod

* * *

Tennessee State Guide Lindsay Scott is an East Nashville based photographer, writer, drinker and ponderer. You can find her on any random night, porch sitting with a side of story telling and a camera in hand. Follow her on Tumblr at lindsayscottphotography.tumblr.com or on her website, lindsayscottphoto.com.

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
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TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA 

The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.  

Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.

Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.” 

Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks.

Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois
Here’s a This Belongs In a Museum dispatch in American oddity for #AmericanGuideWeek:

I’m bringing back one of my favorite discoveries from this past year for American Guide Week. I personally paid a visit to Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, a town on the border of Chicago. After looking at all the various pieces of jewelry and crystal in the store I went down to the basement, where there is a collection of  minerals and fossils that owner Dave Douglass has been collecting since he was a child. After his shop opened, Dave and his wife Sandy continued on their rock quest and traveled throughout the western United States, Canada, and Mexico. Their private collection became so large that in 1988, they opened up the Prehistoric Life Museum, which is open to the public, including school groups. There are fossils from every geological time period, some billions of years old, as well as from all over the world, including a French cave bear skeleton and a Chinese dinosaur. Anyway, I must say it was weird to step down below a busy jewelry shop and see case after case full of old bones and fossils. And right in the middle of Chicagoland! I won’t get into the content of the museum because I nearly failed science in high school, but I was amazed at the number of items in their impressive collection. I particularly liked the coal forming swamp forest from Coal City, Illinois (I’ve been there…don’t go!) and the fact that there appeared to be an actual documentation system for cataloging items (something that can’t be said for some real museums out there). Even though I’m not much of a shopper, I’d probably enjoy going to malls if they all had little museums inside them. Definitely a memorable, unexpected place so if you’re ever in the area, please stop at the Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois. 

Follow thisbelongsinamuseum on Tumblr.
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Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois
Here’s a This Belongs In a Museum dispatch in American oddity for #AmericanGuideWeek:

I’m bringing back one of my favorite discoveries from this past year for American Guide Week. I personally paid a visit to Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, a town on the border of Chicago. After looking at all the various pieces of jewelry and crystal in the store I went down to the basement, where there is a collection of  minerals and fossils that owner Dave Douglass has been collecting since he was a child. After his shop opened, Dave and his wife Sandy continued on their rock quest and traveled throughout the western United States, Canada, and Mexico. Their private collection became so large that in 1988, they opened up the Prehistoric Life Museum, which is open to the public, including school groups. There are fossils from every geological time period, some billions of years old, as well as from all over the world, including a French cave bear skeleton and a Chinese dinosaur. Anyway, I must say it was weird to step down below a busy jewelry shop and see case after case full of old bones and fossils. And right in the middle of Chicagoland! I won’t get into the content of the museum because I nearly failed science in high school, but I was amazed at the number of items in their impressive collection. I particularly liked the coal forming swamp forest from Coal City, Illinois (I’ve been there…don’t go!) and the fact that there appeared to be an actual documentation system for cataloging items (something that can’t be said for some real museums out there). Even though I’m not much of a shopper, I’d probably enjoy going to malls if they all had little museums inside them. Definitely a memorable, unexpected place so if you’re ever in the area, please stop at the Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois. 

Follow thisbelongsinamuseum on Tumblr.
Zoom Info
Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois
Here’s a This Belongs In a Museum dispatch in American oddity for #AmericanGuideWeek:

I’m bringing back one of my favorite discoveries from this past year for American Guide Week. I personally paid a visit to Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, a town on the border of Chicago. After looking at all the various pieces of jewelry and crystal in the store I went down to the basement, where there is a collection of  minerals and fossils that owner Dave Douglass has been collecting since he was a child. After his shop opened, Dave and his wife Sandy continued on their rock quest and traveled throughout the western United States, Canada, and Mexico. Their private collection became so large that in 1988, they opened up the Prehistoric Life Museum, which is open to the public, including school groups. There are fossils from every geological time period, some billions of years old, as well as from all over the world, including a French cave bear skeleton and a Chinese dinosaur. Anyway, I must say it was weird to step down below a busy jewelry shop and see case after case full of old bones and fossils. And right in the middle of Chicagoland! I won’t get into the content of the museum because I nearly failed science in high school, but I was amazed at the number of items in their impressive collection. I particularly liked the coal forming swamp forest from Coal City, Illinois (I’ve been there…don’t go!) and the fact that there appeared to be an actual documentation system for cataloging items (something that can’t be said for some real museums out there). Even though I’m not much of a shopper, I’d probably enjoy going to malls if they all had little museums inside them. Definitely a memorable, unexpected place so if you’re ever in the area, please stop at the Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois. 

Follow thisbelongsinamuseum on Tumblr.
Zoom Info
Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois
Here’s a This Belongs In a Museum dispatch in American oddity for #AmericanGuideWeek:

I’m bringing back one of my favorite discoveries from this past year for American Guide Week. I personally paid a visit to Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, a town on the border of Chicago. After looking at all the various pieces of jewelry and crystal in the store I went down to the basement, where there is a collection of  minerals and fossils that owner Dave Douglass has been collecting since he was a child. After his shop opened, Dave and his wife Sandy continued on their rock quest and traveled throughout the western United States, Canada, and Mexico. Their private collection became so large that in 1988, they opened up the Prehistoric Life Museum, which is open to the public, including school groups. There are fossils from every geological time period, some billions of years old, as well as from all over the world, including a French cave bear skeleton and a Chinese dinosaur. Anyway, I must say it was weird to step down below a busy jewelry shop and see case after case full of old bones and fossils. And right in the middle of Chicagoland! I won’t get into the content of the museum because I nearly failed science in high school, but I was amazed at the number of items in their impressive collection. I particularly liked the coal forming swamp forest from Coal City, Illinois (I’ve been there…don’t go!) and the fact that there appeared to be an actual documentation system for cataloging items (something that can’t be said for some real museums out there). Even though I’m not much of a shopper, I’d probably enjoy going to malls if they all had little museums inside them. Definitely a memorable, unexpected place so if you’re ever in the area, please stop at the Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois. 

Follow thisbelongsinamuseum on Tumblr.
Zoom Info
Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois
Here’s a This Belongs In a Museum dispatch in American oddity for #AmericanGuideWeek:

I’m bringing back one of my favorite discoveries from this past year for American Guide Week. I personally paid a visit to Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, a town on the border of Chicago. After looking at all the various pieces of jewelry and crystal in the store I went down to the basement, where there is a collection of  minerals and fossils that owner Dave Douglass has been collecting since he was a child. After his shop opened, Dave and his wife Sandy continued on their rock quest and traveled throughout the western United States, Canada, and Mexico. Their private collection became so large that in 1988, they opened up the Prehistoric Life Museum, which is open to the public, including school groups. There are fossils from every geological time period, some billions of years old, as well as from all over the world, including a French cave bear skeleton and a Chinese dinosaur. Anyway, I must say it was weird to step down below a busy jewelry shop and see case after case full of old bones and fossils. And right in the middle of Chicagoland! I won’t get into the content of the museum because I nearly failed science in high school, but I was amazed at the number of items in their impressive collection. I particularly liked the coal forming swamp forest from Coal City, Illinois (I’ve been there…don’t go!) and the fact that there appeared to be an actual documentation system for cataloging items (something that can’t be said for some real museums out there). Even though I’m not much of a shopper, I’d probably enjoy going to malls if they all had little museums inside them. Definitely a memorable, unexpected place so if you’re ever in the area, please stop at the Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois. 

Follow thisbelongsinamuseum on Tumblr.
Zoom Info

Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois

Here’s a This Belongs In a Museum dispatch in American oddity for #AmericanGuideWeek:

I’m bringing back one of my favorite discoveries from this past year for American Guide Week. I personally paid a visit to Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, a town on the border of Chicago. After looking at all the various pieces of jewelry and crystal in the store I went down to the basement, where there is a collection of minerals and fossils that owner Dave Douglass has been collecting since he was a child. After his shop opened, Dave and his wife Sandy continued on their rock quest and traveled throughout the western United States, Canada, and Mexico. Their private collection became so large that in 1988, they opened up the Prehistoric Life Museum, which is open to the public, including school groups. There are fossils from every geological time period, some billions of years old, as well as from all over the world, including a French cave bear skeleton and a Chinese dinosaur. Anyway, I must say it was weird to step down below a busy jewelry shop and see case after case full of old bones and fossils. And right in the middle of Chicagoland! I won’t get into the content of the museum because I nearly failed science in high school, but I was amazed at the number of items in their impressive collection. I particularly liked the coal forming swamp forest from Coal City, Illinois (I’ve been there…don’t go!) and the fact that there appeared to be an actual documentation system for cataloging items (something that can’t be said for some real museums out there). Even though I’m not much of a shopper, I’d probably enjoy going to malls if they all had little museums inside them. Definitely a memorable, unexpected place so if you’re ever in the area, please stop at the Prehistoric Life Museum at Dave’s Down to Earth Rock Shop in Evanston, Illinois.

Follow thisbelongsinamuseum on Tumblr.