SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 

Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.

County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).

But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

WIND RIVER DANCERS

On Jan. 21, eight dancers and three drummers from the Wind River Indian Reservation represented Wyoming in President Barack Obama’s Inaugural Parade. They were the state’s only representatives.

On the left is Dean Littleshield, 20. He has danced since he could walk and went to D.C. with his dad, Fergie, and brother, Patrick. He wears a Superman symbol around his neck, hand-beaded by his mom. 

Why Superman? “I have like six more at the house. I go all over and people say, just like what you did, ‘Ah, I love that.’ It just makes me feel good because I have something to represent my mom. She did all the bead work on my outfit. It feels so good to see how much she cares, how much she loves all of us.”

On the right is Christie Wildcat, 14. She wears 365 jingles on her dress. When she dances the Medicine Dance, the jingles “sing” a healing song for every day of the year. The jingles are cut from Skoll cans, folded into cones and sewn on one by one. 

For whom do you dance? ”I dance for the people who can’t dance, like the elders, the disabled, for my family, for the non-natives who would like to dance. I don’t dance for myself or the contest money. I dance for my culture to keep it alive. It’s like a passion. When I’m out there I always think of my family. I dance like I’m one with the drum.”

(Ed. note: This is an excerpt from a longer feature on the Wind River Dancers in the Casper Star-Tribune. The Wind River Dancers are still trying to raise $10,000 to pay for their trip to D.C. For more on making a donation and to see a portrait gallery of other dancers, click here.)

— Interview by Kristy Gray, Star-Tribune Features Editor; Portraits by Dan Cepeda, Star-Tribune Photographer

* * *

The features staff of the Casper Star-Tribune — editor Kristy Gray, outdoors reporter Christine Peterson and reporter Benjamin Storrow — are State Guides to Wyoming. The Star-Tribune is Wyoming’s only statewide newspaper and you can follow the adventures of the features folks at tribfeatures.tumblr.com and find the Star-Tribune at www.trib.com.

KIOWA CALENDAR

…the Kiowas set their life to the rhythm of the chase. As soon as the grass on the prairie was green enough to fatten their ponies, they formed small hunting parties and organized raiding expeditions that extended sometimes as far as Durango, in Mexico. In the fall the whole tribe engaged in a great buffalo hunt, the men killing and the women drying the meat and packing it in skin containers, and stretching the green hides to dry. At the end of this busy season they established winter camps in sheltered places on the upper tributaries of the Red River. Here the men chipped out flint weapons, made buffalo-hide shields, repaired saddles, and perfected their marksmanship, while their ponies cropped dried grass or nibbled cottonwood twigs. … The Kiowas, more than any other hunting tribe, had a sense of historic sequence.

Oklahoma, A Guide To the Sooner State (WPA, 1941)

These calendars were drawn in 1904 by Silver Horn and are part of a larger work recording important events between 1828 and 1904. Most years depict summer, indicated by the green, forked pole, and winter—the dead tree.

Both the Smithsonian and the Sam Noble Museum at the University of Oklahoma have further examples of Silver Horn’s work. We encourage you to flip through the pages to see the records of cold seasons past—seasons with names like Shot Mustache Winter and Horses Ate Ashes Winter.