THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO
As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.
Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.
With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College.  
Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.
Guide Notes: 
snowdown.org
More event pictures.
More parade pictures.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SNOWDOWN - DURANGO, COLORADO

As the nation worries about the effects of Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational marijuana, it can rest assured that a Coloradan’s first love is booze. And when it comes to booze, Colorado’s premier winter celebration, Snowdown, delivers.

Back in 1979, Snowdown was created as a town-sized party to brighten the long Southwest Colorado winter — when the sun can duck behind the mountains at 2:30 pm.

With more than 100 events spread over dozens of locations for five days, it seems like the entire town turns out at some point. Though there are a few events aimed at families, the majority of them are for adults, and those adults are just as likely to be day-drunk 70 year olds as they are to be students from Fort Lewis College. 

Across the city, bars are packed for days on end with people in costume.  This year’s theme was “Safari So Good" — so lots of animal prints and pith helmets. Locals took part in events such as beer pong, the Bar Olympics, thumb wars, trivia contests, keg lid golf, outhouse stuffing, racy fashion shows and general heavy drinking, all leading up to the Snowdown fireworks and the wild light parade down Main Avenue.

Guide Notes

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.
The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.
The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.
The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.
The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.
The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.
The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.
The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.
The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK
The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.
The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info

CONEY ISLAND MERMAID DAY PARADE - BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

The hot press of flesh and glitter on Brooklyn’s sandy shore. Guide to New York Leah Frances tags in with her contribution to Field Assignment #4 - Folk festivals, Pageants, Celebrations, and Customs:

Originating in 1983, the Coney Island Mermaid Parade takes place every June at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York, usually on the Saturday closest to the official start of summer. Billed as the nation’s largest art parade, it pays tribute to the Mardi Gras-type pageantry regularly in evidence on the boardwalk in the beginning of the 20th century. Consisting of marchers in hand-made costumes, push-pull and motorized floats, and antique cars, the parade showcases over 1,500 creative individuals and brings out hundreds of thousands of spectators.

The 2014 Mermaid Parade will be held Saturday, June 21st.

* * *

Leah Frances was born in a small fishing village off the west coast of Canada and raised in Victoria, British Columbia. In pursuit of a graphic design career she moved to New York City in 2005 and now calls Crown Heights, Brooklyn, home. Leah posts daily at americanroads.tumblr.com

NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO
The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.
Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.
The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade.  
Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.   
On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.
Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.
Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

NORTHERN NAVAJO NATION FAIR - SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO

The first week of October signals the start of one of the oldest and most anticipated traditional events on the Navajo Nation, the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico.

Started 102 years ago by the Northern Navajo Nation Agency and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the fair began as a harvest celebration. It has grown well beyond its simple beginnings, and now brings in crowds in excess of 50,000 from around the Four Corners and all over the country  to engulf the normal population of just over 8,000.

The four-day fair schedule showcases what makes the area so unique; from the crowning of this year’s Miss Northern Navajo, the tarp and plywood restaurants of traditional and contemporary foods, powwows, an Indian arts and crafts market, and the occasional Yeti sighting. The biggest draws are the Ye’ii Bi’ Chei ceremony, a nine day healing ritual held on the edge of the fairgrounds, and the legendary parade. 

Running for several miles through the heart of Shiprock, the parade is a gigantic affair. With more than 400 entries, it lasts over four hours. For the two days prior to the fair, people stake out their parade spots with pickup trucks, caution ribbon and tents.  

On the morning of the parade, Shiprock is covered in a sea of people and the atmosphere is absolutely euphoric as the first banner comes down the highway leading a marathon of floats, politicians, bands, royalty and endless showers of candy.

Editor’s note: For more on the event from James, see more parade pictures, more fair pictures, and some great band videos.

Guide note: For more information on the annual, Northern Navajo Nation Fair, visit their website, www.nnnfair.com. For more news from the Shiprock Navajo community, check out Jinii Newz Channel 00.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

ART CAR PARADE - HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Settlers were invariably ready to hold an outdoor celebration.
—Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)

Every year in May, the Orange Show’s Art Car Parade takes place in Houston Texas. While named after art cars, this parade gladly welcomes all wheeled participants, including those on bikes, scooters, skates, and roller blades. Even though May is still technically spring, the temperatures and humidity are already soaring by that time in Houston. Nevertheless, these folks manage to maintain their energy and costumes for the duration of the parade.
* * *
Brenna Brock is a State Guide to Texas who grew up in the western part of the state, but soon left for Austin in search of trees, hills, and occasional precipitation. When she’s not shooing varmints out of the garden, trying to cook native plants, or indulging her cats’ every whim, she’s probably chasing after something with a camera. She posts a photo nearly every day on Tumblr at Mr. Cake’s Photo Adventures.
Zoom Info
ART CAR PARADE - HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Settlers were invariably ready to hold an outdoor celebration.
—Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)

Every year in May, the Orange Show’s Art Car Parade takes place in Houston Texas. While named after art cars, this parade gladly welcomes all wheeled participants, including those on bikes, scooters, skates, and roller blades. Even though May is still technically spring, the temperatures and humidity are already soaring by that time in Houston. Nevertheless, these folks manage to maintain their energy and costumes for the duration of the parade.
* * *
Brenna Brock is a State Guide to Texas who grew up in the western part of the state, but soon left for Austin in search of trees, hills, and occasional precipitation. When she’s not shooing varmints out of the garden, trying to cook native plants, or indulging her cats’ every whim, she’s probably chasing after something with a camera. She posts a photo nearly every day on Tumblr at Mr. Cake’s Photo Adventures.
Zoom Info
ART CAR PARADE - HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Settlers were invariably ready to hold an outdoor celebration.
—Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)

Every year in May, the Orange Show’s Art Car Parade takes place in Houston Texas. While named after art cars, this parade gladly welcomes all wheeled participants, including those on bikes, scooters, skates, and roller blades. Even though May is still technically spring, the temperatures and humidity are already soaring by that time in Houston. Nevertheless, these folks manage to maintain their energy and costumes for the duration of the parade.
* * *
Brenna Brock is a State Guide to Texas who grew up in the western part of the state, but soon left for Austin in search of trees, hills, and occasional precipitation. When she’s not shooing varmints out of the garden, trying to cook native plants, or indulging her cats’ every whim, she’s probably chasing after something with a camera. She posts a photo nearly every day on Tumblr at Mr. Cake’s Photo Adventures.
Zoom Info
ART CAR PARADE - HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Settlers were invariably ready to hold an outdoor celebration.
—Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)

Every year in May, the Orange Show’s Art Car Parade takes place in Houston Texas. While named after art cars, this parade gladly welcomes all wheeled participants, including those on bikes, scooters, skates, and roller blades. Even though May is still technically spring, the temperatures and humidity are already soaring by that time in Houston. Nevertheless, these folks manage to maintain their energy and costumes for the duration of the parade.
* * *
Brenna Brock is a State Guide to Texas who grew up in the western part of the state, but soon left for Austin in search of trees, hills, and occasional precipitation. When she’s not shooing varmints out of the garden, trying to cook native plants, or indulging her cats’ every whim, she’s probably chasing after something with a camera. She posts a photo nearly every day on Tumblr at Mr. Cake’s Photo Adventures.
Zoom Info

ART CAR PARADE - HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Settlers were invariably ready to hold an outdoor celebration.

Texas, A Guide To the Lone Star State (WPA, 1940)

Every year in May, the Orange Show’s Art Car Parade takes place in Houston Texas. While named after art cars, this parade gladly welcomes all wheeled participants, including those on bikes, scooters, skates, and roller blades. Even though May is still technically spring, the temperatures and humidity are already soaring by that time in Houston. Nevertheless, these folks manage to maintain their energy and costumes for the duration of the parade.

* * *

Brenna Brock is a State Guide to Texas who grew up in the western part of the state, but soon left for Austin in search of trees, hills, and occasional precipitation. When she’s not shooing varmints out of the garden, trying to cook native plants, or indulging her cats’ every whim, she’s probably chasing after something with a camera. She posts a photo nearly every day on Tumblr at Mr. Cake’s Photo Adventures.

CAT SQUARE PARADE - VALE, NORTH CAROLINA

Whenever people had asked me if I’d ever been to the Cat Square parade it’d always be followed by a chuckle and knowing look in their eye. They’d tell me about that one time they went and there were elaborate homemade floats on old cars, parade-goers tossing out cans of beer and cigarettes, and lines of horses as far as the eye could see, five for each person there. For the past several years and since I graduated from college, I’ve been wanting to attend this much talked about and surely rowdy time.

The Cat Square Christmas parade has taken in place in Vale, North Carolina for the past few decades. Each December, this little census-designated community of Cat Square sees an influx of a couple thousand people turn out to line up along the side of Zur Leonard and Cat Square Road to watch the parade trot by. Each year I’ve been told the number of spectators and participants grow larger. A few high school bands join in, almost every female in Lincoln County it seems is a beauty queen of some sort and is escorted in a convertible. North Carolina is not short at all of celebrations of its culture, but the Cat Square parade seems a little bit more special to me. I know because almost everyone I know in my hometown has been at least one time and they always have a story about it along with a slight shake of the head, smile, and quick look at the ground.

The parade is a big part of this area around Christmas and a tradition that’s been going strong for years with few people outside of the area taking notice. It’s uniquely ours. It’s the people of the community that keep all this afloat. The parade’s participants and its visitors are the subject of these pictures. A street preacher with a lazy eye handing out tracts, a man selling new and used knives, teenagers watching from their vehicles and younger volunteers in costume or in floats. Just a few people out of the thousands that caught my eye that day and sometimes let me talk to them a little. I’m anxious for next December to come around or the next time I’ll be able to tell my own story about the parade to someone who has never been. 

* * *

Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.

SIKH PARADE - STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA

“I just got back from the Sikh Parade,” I tell my friends. “The what?” they say. “The Sikh Parade. Starts near the beginning of San Joaquin Street, snakes through Downtown and across Weber, then back up California Street. Ya know?”

“Never heard of it.”

I’ve attended the Sikh Parade for three years in a row now, and I maintain that it is one of the most enjoyable and liberating events that Stockton, California, has to offer its residents.

Fresh, delicious Indian food is available on every street corner. Cultural music spills out of float speakers as they roll by. A wash of vibrant, colorful fabric streams through the street — collecting the bright spring sunlight and reflecting it against shop windows and the dashboards of parked cars.

In 2012, the April parade preluded the October celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Stockton Gurdwara on South Grant Street. This temple is the first permanent Sikh settlement in the United States, and Sikhs from all over the California Central Valley come to visit and participate in the parade’s progression through the city.

The Sikh parade happens each year at the tail end of April. 

* * *

Brandon Getty is a State Guide to California, specifically the Central Valley region and his home city of Stockton. Follow on Tumblr at Maps to Stockton, on blogspot at Shooting Daggers, or on his Carbonmade Portfolio.





MUMMER’S DAY PARADE










Among traditional holiday observances is the mummers’ parade on New Year’s Day in Philadelphia. This pageant resembles in spirit and form the old English Christmas season festivities, when a Lord of Misrule was chosen, and elaborately costumed revelers danced and paraded. But its immediate ancestor is the old German tradition of ‘bell-snickeling.’ As early as 1800 scattered groups of mummers from South Philadelphia paraded the streets and rang bells to receive the award of cakes and candies if their identity was not guessed. The first formal parade was held on January 1, 1901, to celebrate the turn of the century; it was so enthusiastically received that it has since been held annually.






— Pennsylvania, A Guide to the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)
* * *
Philadelphia-based photographer Stephen Dyer is our Guide to Pennsylvania. Follow his great photos of the Keystone State and other places on Tumblr at thebrokentooth.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info




MUMMER’S DAY PARADE










Among traditional holiday observances is the mummers’ parade on New Year’s Day in Philadelphia. This pageant resembles in spirit and form the old English Christmas season festivities, when a Lord of Misrule was chosen, and elaborately costumed revelers danced and paraded. But its immediate ancestor is the old German tradition of ‘bell-snickeling.’ As early as 1800 scattered groups of mummers from South Philadelphia paraded the streets and rang bells to receive the award of cakes and candies if their identity was not guessed. The first formal parade was held on January 1, 1901, to celebrate the turn of the century; it was so enthusiastically received that it has since been held annually.






— Pennsylvania, A Guide to the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)
* * *
Philadelphia-based photographer Stephen Dyer is our Guide to Pennsylvania. Follow his great photos of the Keystone State and other places on Tumblr at thebrokentooth.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info




MUMMER’S DAY PARADE










Among traditional holiday observances is the mummers’ parade on New Year’s Day in Philadelphia. This pageant resembles in spirit and form the old English Christmas season festivities, when a Lord of Misrule was chosen, and elaborately costumed revelers danced and paraded. But its immediate ancestor is the old German tradition of ‘bell-snickeling.’ As early as 1800 scattered groups of mummers from South Philadelphia paraded the streets and rang bells to receive the award of cakes and candies if their identity was not guessed. The first formal parade was held on January 1, 1901, to celebrate the turn of the century; it was so enthusiastically received that it has since been held annually.






— Pennsylvania, A Guide to the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)
* * *
Philadelphia-based photographer Stephen Dyer is our Guide to Pennsylvania. Follow his great photos of the Keystone State and other places on Tumblr at thebrokentooth.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

MUMMER’S DAY PARADE

Among traditional holiday observances is the mummers’ parade on New Year’s Day in Philadelphia. This pageant resembles in spirit and form the old English Christmas season festivities, when a Lord of Misrule was chosen, and elaborately costumed revelers danced and paraded. But its immediate ancestor is the old German tradition of ‘bell-snickeling.’ As early as 1800 scattered groups of mummers from South Philadelphia paraded the streets and rang bells to receive the award of cakes and candies if their identity was not guessed. The first formal parade was held on January 1, 1901, to celebrate the turn of the century; it was so enthusiastically received that it has since been held annually.

Pennsylvania, A Guide to the Keystone State (WPA, 1940)

* * *

Philadelphia-based photographer Stephen Dyer is our Guide to Pennsylvania. Follow his great photos of the Keystone State and other places on Tumblr at thebrokentooth.tumblr.com.