A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info
A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.
With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.
This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”
—Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *
Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.
Zoom Info

A BRIEF GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES IN SEVEN FACES 

There is a large transient population of tourists, job-hunters, climate-seekers, elderly retired persons, and Hollywood hopefuls.

With these comparative newcomers, who form the majority of the population, ties with the home state remain strong. Angelenos dearly love to reminisce about “back East” and “back East” may be anywhere east of the Rocky Mountains.

This attachment for the old home furnishes a clue to the character of the City of the Angels and its people. It suggests that the transplanted settler has never quite grown used to living here, has never quite been able to regard Los Angeles as his true home. Coming largely from the prairie regions, of rigorous climate and even more rigorous conventions, he suddenly finds himself in an exotic land of lofty purple mountains, azure ocean, and mild, seductive climate, where the romance of old Spain is nurtured and blends with the gaudiness of Hollywood, where rigid conventions are relaxed and comparative tolerance is the rule. To many a newcomer, Los Angeles is a modern Promised Land. It amazes and delights him, and thaws him out physically and spiritually. There is a heady fragrance in the air, and a spaciousness of sky and land and sea that give him a new sense of freedom and tempt him to taste new pleasures, new habits of living, new religions. Finding himself in the amusement capital of the West and at the hub of a vast natural playground offering every variety of sport from surf boarding to skijoring, he proceeds to have more fun than he ever dreamed was possible. He is fascinated by strange new industries and new agricultural products: movie studios, oil fields, almond orchards, vineyards, olive and orange groves. He encounters new and exotic types of people: movie actors and sombreroed Mexicans, kimonoed Japanese and turbaned Hindus. He develops an urge to try things that are novel and exciting, from Chinese herb doctors to Indian medicine men, from social credit to nudism, from a wine-colored stucco dwelling to a restaurant shaped like a hat. And because the array of things to do and see is so dazzlingly different from everything he has known, his curiosity is always whetted, his appetite never sated. He feels a certain strangeness in this place he now calls his home, a strangeness that is at once exhilarating and disturbing, and that he had not known in his native place “back East.”

Los Angeles, A Guide To the City and Its Environs (WPA, 1941)

* * *

Julie Grace Immink is a social documentary photographer living in Los Angeles. She was born in the wagon of a traveling show. Exploring the streets with her camera is how she connects to the surrounding world. Her photographs are saturated with thoughts on life, death, faith and community. She gains inspiration from anything old and broken but believes in healing and restoration. Follow on tumblr at juliegracephotography.tumblr.com.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

MARDI GRAS - NEW ORLEANS, LOUSIANA

Mardi Gras, that maddest of all mad days when every man may be a king, or, if he prefers, a tramp or a clown or an Indian chief, and dance in the streets. 

New Orleans City Guide (WPA, 1938)

If you didn’t come to party, take your bitch ass home,” shouts the man selling t-shirts on Bourbon Street. He adds, “I have size sexy for the ladies.”

The main street for Carnival Season partying in New Orleans has a distinct aroma—a mix of sweat, crawfish, Daiquiri puke and just-starting-to-rot garbage. All around the senses are assaulted with beads thrown from above, shoes getting stuck to the sticky wash that covers the street, drummers drumming, people shouting and bursts of purple, gold and green. Mardi Gras has been taking place in New Orleans since before 1835. It is a time for the loud, the grotesque, the strange and excess. While this might sound awful, it is intoxicating. The season has lasted all these years because it is what you make it.

Everyone has a different experience because no one is in charge and the celebration spreads throughout the city. If you came to party, you will find one on Bourbon. I saw lots of tits, a couple asses, hundreds of hollow plastic legs dangling around people’s necks filled with red liquor, people tumbling after one too many and too many crazy outfits to count.

The balcony people taunt the crowds below. Some put fancy trinkets on fishing wire to yank the items out of greedy, eager hands. They lay in wait to judge who is deserving of the beads. Sometimes it requires a dance or a flash and sometimes they take pity on a cute nine-year-old who is getting quite an eyeful.

Just one street over, there is the opportunity for family friendly fare. Royal Street, which turns into St. Charles when heading Uptown, is filled with jugglers and street musicians, and is also the main parade route for the bigger parades. Smartly, the first couple rows of people have chairs and right behind, people set up ladders with elaborate boxes for children to sit in for a better view. There is definitely alcohol, but people try to keep it together a little more here.

Quintron and Miss Pussycat are playing at the Spellcaster Lodge with Jello Biafra in attendance and Big Freedia is bouncing at VASO. There are fancy balls with high society that are by invitation only and parades that are solely for the people who know where they start and stop.

It can also be a time for the political. Different Krewes head different parades, all with unique themes for the year. The Krewe d’Etat is known for its biting satire and this year was no different with floats criticizing the sex trade and prison system. The Zulu Parade, that goes through the neighborhood torn apart by the freeway, celebrated the life of Nelson Mandela this year.

For me, Mardi Gras was cruising the city by bicycle and taking in the sites and sounds. The majority of the time it was a delight. Walking and making photographs, I was moved to tears during the Talladega College Marching Band’s version of Get Lucky and was surprised to find how amazing it is to make eye contact with someone on a giant float and catching the beads thrown right at me. And I already miss the smell.

Mark Twain said: “I think that I may say that an American has not seen the United States until he has seen Mardi-Gras in New Orleans.” 

* * *

Tammy Mercure is a State Guide to Tennessee. She was named one of the “100 under 100: The New Superstars of Southern Art” by Oxford American magazine.

Follow on Tumblr at tammymercure or on her website, TammyMercure.com. Support her work at TCB Press.

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.

North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.

Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.

* * *

Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.

THE LONELIEST ROAD IN AMERICA - UTAH

The stretch westward…appears barren, but among its rolling hills and shifting sand dunes grow 1,050 different flowering plants and 90 species of grasses. The rolling plains supported herds of antelope, and deer browsed on the timbered hills before the white man came with his long-range rifles and brought the seeds of tumbleweed, white top, and wild mustard. Jack rabbits, cottontails, and other small life of the desert are still plentiful, and the spine-chilling wail of the coyote can be heard every night.

Utah, A Guide To the State (WPA, 1941)

We arose early and departed for the west desert; the moon was slowly falling, making room for the rising sun. Outside of Delta, Utah, down a stretch of Route 50, “The Loneliest Road in America, is Ibex and this was our destination. The air was cold and the truck full of talk in anticipation for the adventure at hand. After making our stops for food, beer, and gas, we set out down the barren road and watched as the last structure passed us by. Alone and far from the city, we eventually came upon a solitary tree and pulled over. 

The jagged tree was dead, cold, and wrapped in barb wire. In its branches hung shoes while others more worn and tattered found their rest on the dusty ground. The shoe tree, I later came to understand, is one of many found across the sates and is a testament to travelers. It represents a shared history and experience of those who love to explore our country—take the road less traveled, and simply see all that there is to see. It was humbling to stand under the soles that had been thrown into the branches and wonder what each pair had seen. 

After driving a bit longer and leaving the road, we reached Ibex. Here, under the hot sun, we made ourselves at home: exploring boulders, climbing, drinking, taking pictures, playing ball with the pups, and enjoying the freedom the vast desert offered us. This was a day to escape the busy city, take the beaten path to a place unknown, and share a new experience with friends. We were far from our home but not in the least bit ready to return when the sun began to fall. From the sand in the west desert to the heavily wooded mountains in Uintas, Utah is truly a beautiful state and it never ceases to amaze me. 

* * *

James DuPont is 22, a student, tattooed, a reader, a writer, an explorer and adventurer, a dog owner, an outdoor-enthusiast, a climber, a skier, a taker of photos and much more. Born and raised in the Tetons, he learned early on that you must create your own adventure by doing whatever makes you happy. Follow him at jamesdupont.tumblr.com—a record of his adventures and all the little things in between.   

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.

DOWN IN THE VALLEY – NAUGATUCK RIVER, CONNECTICUT

The lower Naugatuck River Valley, also known simply as “The Valley,” was once the state’s most prosperous region. In the 19th and 20th centuries industry ran swiftly through The Valley, just like the river that made it possible. These quintessential mill towns led the way in the manufacturing of brass and rubber as well as shipbuilding. The borough of Naugatuck gave us the modern wonder of artificial leather known as Naugahyde. These communities were key in helping change the perception of “Made in the USA” from one of inferior workmanship to the world standard of high quality that it is today.

As towns grew and industry increased in The Valley so did the amount of sewage and pollution that poured into the river. After enduring centuries of abuse the river could take no more — and in came The Great Depression as punishment. It brought economic downturn, a shrinking population and urban decay. The Valley was Connecticut’s localized version of the nation’s larger Rustbelt — with its empty storefronts and abandoned buildings. 

In 1955 Hurricane Diane came calling to finish the job, washing away any fortune still remaining and decimating entire neighborhoods. These are now commuter towns for some, with pockets of luxury homes serving as a bedroom community to New York City and lower Fairfield County. However, no one would mistake this area for anything other than the working-class towns they have always been.

You can travel quickly through this region on Route 8 as it snakes north and south like The Valley’s namesake river. The highway offers distant glimpses of some towns while it slices straight through others. To get off the highway and onto the local streets is a reminder that these are river towns as there is a constant slope to navigate as you make your way either down to the Naugatuck River or up and away from it.

Away from the town centers, the old neighborhoods and brick buildings start to thin as they give way to farmland. Barns and farmhouses dot the countryside and where the road rises you can catch sight of the indigo hue of the Litchfield Hills in winter. Out here you can forget about hydropower and all that talk about industry and manufacturing and remember there was once a simpler life along the river that didn’t belch smoke and dust. It belonged to the Algonquian peoples who originally spoke the word “Naugatuck” to mean “lone tree by the fishing place”. The river is cleaner now, and the fish have returned, but more than one way of life is gone forever in The Valley.

* * *

Guide to the Northeast Brett Klein lives in Connecticut and works in New York, but prefers small town life and his home state of Maine. Any chance to get rural is a mental vacation. Follow Klein on Tumblr at The Coast is Clear. His curatorial collection of Americana, rural life, other artists and ephemera can be seen on Tumblr at Tons of Land.

RAILROADS - NEBRASKA

Then the railroads came. The town was elated when Abraham Lincoln selected Council Bluffs as the terminal of the Union Pacific Line; later, engineers and Douglas County bonds brought it across the river to Omaha. In 1863 the construction of the Union Pacific formally began. Two years later, the first train from Omaha ran to Salings’ Grove with Gen. W.T. Sherman, of Civil War fame, and 20 leading citizens riding on flat cars with nail kegs for seats. 
—Nebraska: A Guide to the Cornhusker State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Raised in a military family, Midwest Guide Rob Walters has lived in South Carolina, Georgia, California, New York, Nebraska, New Hampshire and Illinois. Always looking for an excuse to hit the road, he spends most of his creative energy on long drives, exploring the Midwest and beyond. He lives with his wife and soon to arrive son in Omaha, Nebraska, and chairs the Art Department at Iowa Western Community College across the river in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Follow on Tumblr at fromthemiddle.tumblr.com.
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RAILROADS - NEBRASKA

Then the railroads came. The town was elated when Abraham Lincoln selected Council Bluffs as the terminal of the Union Pacific Line; later, engineers and Douglas County bonds brought it across the river to Omaha. In 1863 the construction of the Union Pacific formally began. Two years later, the first train from Omaha ran to Salings’ Grove with Gen. W.T. Sherman, of Civil War fame, and 20 leading citizens riding on flat cars with nail kegs for seats. 
—Nebraska: A Guide to the Cornhusker State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Raised in a military family, Midwest Guide Rob Walters has lived in South Carolina, Georgia, California, New York, Nebraska, New Hampshire and Illinois. Always looking for an excuse to hit the road, he spends most of his creative energy on long drives, exploring the Midwest and beyond. He lives with his wife and soon to arrive son in Omaha, Nebraska, and chairs the Art Department at Iowa Western Community College across the river in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Follow on Tumblr at fromthemiddle.tumblr.com.
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RAILROADS - NEBRASKA

Then the railroads came. The town was elated when Abraham Lincoln selected Council Bluffs as the terminal of the Union Pacific Line; later, engineers and Douglas County bonds brought it across the river to Omaha. In 1863 the construction of the Union Pacific formally began. Two years later, the first train from Omaha ran to Salings’ Grove with Gen. W.T. Sherman, of Civil War fame, and 20 leading citizens riding on flat cars with nail kegs for seats. 
—Nebraska: A Guide to the Cornhusker State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Raised in a military family, Midwest Guide Rob Walters has lived in South Carolina, Georgia, California, New York, Nebraska, New Hampshire and Illinois. Always looking for an excuse to hit the road, he spends most of his creative energy on long drives, exploring the Midwest and beyond. He lives with his wife and soon to arrive son in Omaha, Nebraska, and chairs the Art Department at Iowa Western Community College across the river in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Follow on Tumblr at fromthemiddle.tumblr.com.
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RAILROADS - NEBRASKA

Then the railroads came. The town was elated when Abraham Lincoln selected Council Bluffs as the terminal of the Union Pacific Line; later, engineers and Douglas County bonds brought it across the river to Omaha. In 1863 the construction of the Union Pacific formally began. Two years later, the first train from Omaha ran to Salings’ Grove with Gen. W.T. Sherman, of Civil War fame, and 20 leading citizens riding on flat cars with nail kegs for seats. 
—Nebraska: A Guide to the Cornhusker State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Raised in a military family, Midwest Guide Rob Walters has lived in South Carolina, Georgia, California, New York, Nebraska, New Hampshire and Illinois. Always looking for an excuse to hit the road, he spends most of his creative energy on long drives, exploring the Midwest and beyond. He lives with his wife and soon to arrive son in Omaha, Nebraska, and chairs the Art Department at Iowa Western Community College across the river in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Follow on Tumblr at fromthemiddle.tumblr.com.
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RAILROADS - NEBRASKA

Then the railroads came. The town was elated when Abraham Lincoln selected Council Bluffs as the terminal of the Union Pacific Line; later, engineers and Douglas County bonds brought it across the river to Omaha. In 1863 the construction of the Union Pacific formally began. Two years later, the first train from Omaha ran to Salings’ Grove with Gen. W.T. Sherman, of Civil War fame, and 20 leading citizens riding on flat cars with nail kegs for seats. 
—Nebraska: A Guide to the Cornhusker State (WPA, 1939)

* * *
Raised in a military family, Midwest Guide Rob Walters has lived in South Carolina, Georgia, California, New York, Nebraska, New Hampshire and Illinois. Always looking for an excuse to hit the road, he spends most of his creative energy on long drives, exploring the Midwest and beyond. He lives with his wife and soon to arrive son in Omaha, Nebraska, and chairs the Art Department at Iowa Western Community College across the river in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Follow on Tumblr at fromthemiddle.tumblr.com.
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RAILROADS - NEBRASKA

Then the railroads came. The town was elated when Abraham Lincoln selected Council Bluffs as the terminal of the Union Pacific Line; later, engineers and Douglas County bonds brought it across the river to Omaha. In 1863 the construction of the Union Pacific formally began. Two years later, the first train from Omaha ran to Salings’ Grove with Gen. W.T. Sherman, of Civil War fame, and 20 leading citizens riding on flat cars with nail kegs for seats. 

Nebraska: A Guide to the Cornhusker State (WPA, 1939)

* * *

Raised in a military family, Midwest Guide Rob Walters has lived in South Carolina, Georgia, California, New York, Nebraska, New Hampshire and Illinois. Always looking for an excuse to hit the road, he spends most of his creative energy on long drives, exploring the Midwest and beyond. He lives with his wife and soon to arrive son in Omaha, Nebraska, and chairs the Art Department at Iowa Western Community College across the river in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Follow on Tumblr at fromthemiddle.tumblr.com.

JEFF DAVIS PIE - SOUTHERN FOODWAYS

According to family legend, my grandmother found the recipe for Jeff Davis Pie printed on a sugar bag just after she married. Since then, this depression-era Southern specialty, which tastes like a pecanless pecan pie, hasn’t missed a single family holiday. There are plenty of increasingly complex variations — ranging from roadside-fave lemon chess pie to Momofuku’s elaborate Crack pie — but this is the one to go to when you’re short on time, skill and/or ingredients — or when you just want something simple and sweet.

Guide Notes: How to make Jeff Davis Pie —

3c - Sugar
1c - Butter
1T - Flour
1/4t - Salt
1t - Vanilla
4 eggs - beaten lightly
1c - Milk
  • Cream sugar and butter.
  • Add flour, salt and vanilla and beat well.
  • Add eggs (beat first) and mix.
  • Add milk and mix well.
  • Makes 2 pies, use 9” pie crust.
  • Bake at 450 for 10 min. Reduce heat to 350 for 30 min. or until filing is firm. 

* * *

Brenna Brock is a State Guide to Texas who grew up in the western part of the state, but soon left for Austin in search of trees, hills, and occasional precipitation. When she’s not shooing varmints out of the garden, trying to cook native plants, or indulging her cats’ every whim, she’s probably chasing after something with a camera. She posts a photo nearly every day on Tumblr at Mr. Cake’s Photo Adventures.

LOCAL FLORA - PORTLAND, OREGON 

The woods of Oregon are a wonderland of overwhelming proportions. The eye, always drawn to the distant snow-capped peaks, sweeps over magnificent verdant blankets that cover the lower hills and spread back in tiers over higher hills and far up the mountainsides. From the heights, the forest far below is an undulating layer of dark green, sparkling with gem-like lakes and silvery streams, which stretches far off into a horizon serrated with the silhouette of distant trees. 

Oregon: End of the Trail (WPA, 1940)

Guide Notes:

1: Basil, Late Summer, Portland, OR.

2: Smoke Bush, Portland, OR.

3: Grasses, Portland, OR.

4: Houseplant, Portland, OR.

5: Japanese Maple, Autumn, Portland, OR. 

6: Weeds along the Columbia River, Portland, OR.

7: Trees along the Columbia, Portland, OR.

8: Branches, Portland, OR. 

9: Grasses, Sauvie Island, OR.

10: Tree, Vines and Fence, Portland, OR. 

All Images © Robert Pallesen, All Rights Reserved.

* * *

Robert Pallesen is a fine art photographer currently living in Portland, OR. Pallesen’s work investigates the transient nature of the landscape and our relationship with it. His photographs are featured in the Humble Arts Foundation Collector’s Guide to Emerging Art Photography as well as Various Photographs, published by TV books. Pallesen’s work has been exhibited at Pushdot Studios, Newspace Center of Photography, San Francisco Camerawork, The New York Photo Festival, Pierro Gallery and CGR gallery in New York. His work is currently on view at The BlueSky Gallery in Portland as part of the Northwest Drawers program.

You can view more work by Robert Pallesen at his website and blog.

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 

FOLKLIFE: A VISION FROM GOD - HOLDEN BEACH, NORTH CAROLINA
Mary Paulsen is a visionary artist who lives and works near Holden Beach, North Carolina. Sixteen years ago, while washing dishes in her kitchen, she received a vision from God that instructed and compelled her to to paint. She often paints on the back sides of old windows, layering on details “in reverse.” Most of the materials that she uses are upcycled. In addition to painting, over the course of several years she constructed glass bottle houses and created an entire village of dollhouses on the property surrounding her home. Mary owns over eight thousand dolls and hopes to one day open a museum that charges admission, with proceeds going to charities that help provide food for hungry children.
“I think it’s really a shame and a cry that anybody would be going hungry in the land of plenty. It shouldn’t be that way and it wouldn’t be that way if some people weren’t so greedy and thinking of themselves all the time.”
The doll house village contains a small chapel, pictured above, where Mary was married.
Editor’s Note: This work began as a project of the North Carolina Folklife Institute.
* * *
Guide to North Carolina and the South Chris Fowler is a North Carolinian, photographer, folklorist, and curator. In 2011 he was awarded a Lewis Hine Documentary Fellowship from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Follow his work at http://www.chrisfowlerphoto.com.
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FOLKLIFE: A VISION FROM GOD - HOLDEN BEACH, NORTH CAROLINA
Mary Paulsen is a visionary artist who lives and works near Holden Beach, North Carolina. Sixteen years ago, while washing dishes in her kitchen, she received a vision from God that instructed and compelled her to to paint. She often paints on the back sides of old windows, layering on details “in reverse.” Most of the materials that she uses are upcycled. In addition to painting, over the course of several years she constructed glass bottle houses and created an entire village of dollhouses on the property surrounding her home. Mary owns over eight thousand dolls and hopes to one day open a museum that charges admission, with proceeds going to charities that help provide food for hungry children.
“I think it’s really a shame and a cry that anybody would be going hungry in the land of plenty. It shouldn’t be that way and it wouldn’t be that way if some people weren’t so greedy and thinking of themselves all the time.”
The doll house village contains a small chapel, pictured above, where Mary was married.
Editor’s Note: This work began as a project of the North Carolina Folklife Institute.
* * *
Guide to North Carolina and the South Chris Fowler is a North Carolinian, photographer, folklorist, and curator. In 2011 he was awarded a Lewis Hine Documentary Fellowship from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Follow his work at http://www.chrisfowlerphoto.com.
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FOLKLIFE: A VISION FROM GOD - HOLDEN BEACH, NORTH CAROLINA
Mary Paulsen is a visionary artist who lives and works near Holden Beach, North Carolina. Sixteen years ago, while washing dishes in her kitchen, she received a vision from God that instructed and compelled her to to paint. She often paints on the back sides of old windows, layering on details “in reverse.” Most of the materials that she uses are upcycled. In addition to painting, over the course of several years she constructed glass bottle houses and created an entire village of dollhouses on the property surrounding her home. Mary owns over eight thousand dolls and hopes to one day open a museum that charges admission, with proceeds going to charities that help provide food for hungry children.
“I think it’s really a shame and a cry that anybody would be going hungry in the land of plenty. It shouldn’t be that way and it wouldn’t be that way if some people weren’t so greedy and thinking of themselves all the time.”
The doll house village contains a small chapel, pictured above, where Mary was married.
Editor’s Note: This work began as a project of the North Carolina Folklife Institute.
* * *
Guide to North Carolina and the South Chris Fowler is a North Carolinian, photographer, folklorist, and curator. In 2011 he was awarded a Lewis Hine Documentary Fellowship from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Follow his work at http://www.chrisfowlerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
FOLKLIFE: A VISION FROM GOD - HOLDEN BEACH, NORTH CAROLINA
Mary Paulsen is a visionary artist who lives and works near Holden Beach, North Carolina. Sixteen years ago, while washing dishes in her kitchen, she received a vision from God that instructed and compelled her to to paint. She often paints on the back sides of old windows, layering on details “in reverse.” Most of the materials that she uses are upcycled. In addition to painting, over the course of several years she constructed glass bottle houses and created an entire village of dollhouses on the property surrounding her home. Mary owns over eight thousand dolls and hopes to one day open a museum that charges admission, with proceeds going to charities that help provide food for hungry children.
“I think it’s really a shame and a cry that anybody would be going hungry in the land of plenty. It shouldn’t be that way and it wouldn’t be that way if some people weren’t so greedy and thinking of themselves all the time.”
The doll house village contains a small chapel, pictured above, where Mary was married.
Editor’s Note: This work began as a project of the North Carolina Folklife Institute.
* * *
Guide to North Carolina and the South Chris Fowler is a North Carolinian, photographer, folklorist, and curator. In 2011 he was awarded a Lewis Hine Documentary Fellowship from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Follow his work at http://www.chrisfowlerphoto.com.
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FOLKLIFE: A VISION FROM GOD - HOLDEN BEACH, NORTH CAROLINA

Mary Paulsen is a visionary artist who lives and works near Holden Beach, North Carolina. Sixteen years ago, while washing dishes in her kitchen, she received a vision from God that instructed and compelled her to to paint. She often paints on the back sides of old windows, layering on details “in reverse.” Most of the materials that she uses are upcycled. In addition to painting, over the course of several years she constructed glass bottle houses and created an entire village of dollhouses on the property surrounding her home. Mary owns over eight thousand dolls and hopes to one day open a museum that charges admission, with proceeds going to charities that help provide food for hungry children.

“I think it’s really a shame and a cry that anybody would be going hungry in the land of plenty. It shouldn’t be that way and it wouldn’t be that way if some people weren’t so greedy and thinking of themselves all the time.”

The doll house village contains a small chapel, pictured above, where Mary was married.

Editor’s NoteThis work began as a project of the North Carolina Folklife Institute.

* * *

Guide to North Carolina and the South Chris Fowler is a North Carolinian, photographer, folklorist, and curator. In 2011 he was awarded a Lewis Hine Documentary Fellowship from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Follow his work at http://www.chrisfowlerphoto.com.

COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
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COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
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COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
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COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
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COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
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Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
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COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
Zoom Info
COMMERCE, GEORGIA
Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.
* * *
Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 
Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com. 
This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit. 
Zoom Info

COMMERCE, GEORGIA

Commerce, Georgia: The name of the town is ironic, given how hard it has been hit by the economic unraveling we find ourselves witness to.   Outback Steakhouse and Rockabilly Auction House are two of the last standing businesses in an entire strip mall there. Even in hard times, I guess there will always be a demand for meat and memorabilia.

* * *

Vanessa Prestage is a Vancouver and Atlanta based photographer specializing in Fine Art and Unit Still Photography. 

Southern: born and bred. The accent persists, but only just. She comes from a small town that serves as the halfway point between Macon and Atlanta, Georgia. Follow her on tumblr at southdonerose.tumblr.com

This dispatch arrived care of THE AMERICAN GUIDE submission page. Be a guide yourself and send a post from your state: theamericanguide.org/submit.