OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
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OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
Zoom Info
OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
Zoom Info
OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
Zoom Info
OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
Zoom Info
OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
Zoom Info
OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
Zoom Info
OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
Zoom Info
OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
Zoom Info
OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.
—Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 
For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website. 

* * *
Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.
Zoom Info

OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY - BOISE, IDAHO

There was Ferd Patterson, for instance: gambler, gunman, and murderer, he killed the captain of a boat in Portland, scalped his ex-mistress, and climaxed his playfulness by slaying the sheriff of Idaho City. Ferd was, records declare, a pulp villain of the first water: he affected high-heeled boots, plaid trousers reinforced with buckskin, a fancy silk vest spanned by a heavy gold chain of California nuggets, and a frock coat of beaver cloth trimmed with otter.

Idaho, A Guide In Word and Picture (WPA, 1937)

The above quote describes one of the sinister inmates of of the Idaho City territorial jail. That structure long ago disappeared, but the intrepid Alex Hecht ventures into the confines of another historical Idaho lock up to send a dispatch for Field Assignment #3 - History:

Founded as a territorial prison in 1872, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is one of only four territorial prisons open to the public in the United States. Primarily constructed of sandstone quarried in the nearby foothills by the prisoners themselves, the penitentiary housed inmates from April of 1872 until December of 1973. In total over 13,000 inmates were housed here during the prison’s 101 years of operation. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974 the Old Pen has attracted visitors from all 50 states and countless foreign countries. Annual visitors have increased substantially in recent years, with about 40,000 visitors to the facility last year, up from 20,000 just five years ago. 

For more information visit the Idaho State Historical Society’s website

* * *

Alex Hecht is a photographer and musician based in Boise, Idaho. Follow him on Tumblr at ahechtphoto.tumblr.com and find him on Facebook at facebook.com/ahechtphoto.

ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info
ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.
—California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.
* * *
EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.
Zoom Info

ALCATRAZ ISLAND - CALIFORNIA 

ALCATRAZ ISLAND (Sp., pelican), in the bay between San Francisco and Sausalito, is one of the world’s most feared and widely publicized penal institutions, the Federal prison for incorrigibles (visitors by warden’s permission only). Alcatraz, known colloquially as “The Rock,” a 12-acre island, was fortified by the Spanish prior to American occupation. From 1859 it was used as a military prison and a United States Army disciplinary barracks; during and after the World War many conscientious objectors were removed here from Fort Leavenworth. Alcatraz was made a Federal penitentiary in 1933, to house unruly prisoners form other Federal institutions. The rigid discipline, its elaborate barriers to prevent escape, including the “electric eye” to detect the presence of metal on a prisoner, and the names of its notorious inmates have combined to make thousands of newspaper headlines. Swift currents flowing around “The Rock” make escape by water practically impossible. Two prisoners made the attempt in 1938, but their ultimate success or failure is unknown.

California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Before visiting Alcatraz I was worried the island would be some kind of weird Disney type of tourist trap. Such a famous landmark with so much history can often be sucked dry of the uniqueness and truth of the place. I was surprised to find that Alcratraz, although a bit touristy in certain aspects, was pretty damn authentic. It had creepily empty corners and areas everywhere I looked, and I wasn’t left feeling like I had been robbed of the authenticity of the place. Every shadow dripped with history and the past and my mind couldn’t help but creating story lines for every shot I took. Disney it is not.

* * *

EE Berger is a photographer Detroit bred and Brooklyn based. She seeks out emptiness, solitude and peaceful moments and was recently selected as one of Photoboite’s “30 Women Photographers Under 30” for 2013. You can find her on Tumblr at eeberger.tumblr.com, and find her website at eebergerphoto.com.