RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…
—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.
In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  
Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.
While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.
During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.
With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   
After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.
Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.
 * * *
April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.
Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.
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RELIGION - CENTRAL ALABAMA 

Soon after the war, the Negroes, who had been members of white churches, began establishing their own congregations. They had no funds with which to build and found that sites were difficult to obtain. For a time they were forced to meet in any available building…

—Alabama: A Guide to the Deep South (WPA, 1941)

Religion, specifically Christianity, plays a vital role in rural Alabama life. Traditionally, the church served as a central meeting place and social nucleus for country dwellers. Today, a disproportionate number of churches dot the verdant landscapes surrounding small, one-stoplight towns.

In winter the scant foliage reveals even more of these worship centers, which seem to materialize out of the wilderness. You’ll find these squat, whitewashed structures on backwoods roadways, perched atop remote hillsides, and nestled at the end of quiet dirt roads.  

Though many congregations long abandoned their traditional church structures for newer buildings. The old edifices are rarely demolished. Relics of a bygone era, the abandoned buildings slowly fade into the landscape. Ravenous kudzu vines devour their facades.

While there has been a great deal of progress in Alabama as far as race-relations are concerned, most places of worship remain fairly segregated along racial lines. Even in the smallest towns, churches with majority white congregations are situated a short distance from black churches of the same denomination. These divisions are holdovers from slavery and segregation. Most parishioners see their fellow church members as a sort of extended family; historically, this extension rarely crossed racial boundaries.

During segregation, church was one of the few places where black Alabamians felt safe and free to cultivate an identity. For many African-Americans, church served as a community headquarters for mobilizing against Jim Crow laws. Worship services allowed them a brief reprieve from the troubles of the world around them. These sanctuaries were also home to some of the first black schools.

With the music and message alternating between uplifting and woeful, the order of Sunday services haven’t changed much since the 1950s. While today’s services are shorter and, thanks to air conditioning, more comfortable, the devotionals at a number of black churches are still slow, meditative sessions of mournful humming and call-and-response singing. The spirit and tone of many devotional songs were carried over from the fields. While most slaves were punished for talking while they worked, it was common for overseers to allow singing.   

After devotion, the spirit of the service grows more and more uplifting. The choir sings songs of promise. The sermon—which starts with the reading of a few verses— crescendos into a high-energy show of jumping and shouting. Churchgoers stand and match the minister’s enthusiasm. They wave their hands, jump up and down, stomp their feet, shout things like “amen,” “yes,” and “preach!” This type of enthusiastic service still occurs at a number of churches across central Alabama. These services, like the old worship structures speckling the rural landscape, attest to how closely linked the past and the present are in the increasingly complicated palimpsest that is the American South.

Guide Notes: All photos were taken by April Dobbins in Hale County, Alabama.

 * * *

April Dobbins is a Guide to Alabama and the Southeast. Born and raised in Alabama, she is a writer and photographer. Though she has lived just about everywhere, she can’t seem to shake her Southern.  She currently resides in Miami, Florida, and is at work on Alabamaland, a documentary project about African-American farm life in rural Alabama.

Find her on Tumblr at aprilartiste.tumblr.com and on her website at aprildobbins.com.

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
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EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info
EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.
—North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.
Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.
* * *
Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.
Zoom Info

EDEN, NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina was strongly influenced by the “Great Revival” that swept the country after the Revolutionary War and lasted intermittently until the War between the States… This emotional preaching, interspersed with stirring hymns, induced physical manifestations known as “the exercises.” These included the phenomena known as jerking, wheeling, dancing, laughing, barking, and falling down.

North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State (WPA, 1939)

Eden, North Carolina is a city in Rockingham County that nearly borders Virginia. It’s where the Smith and Dan Rivers converge. It began as a utopian colony founded by William Byrd II and was later sold to some planters by Byrd’s son to pay off his gambling debts.

Guide note: One of the best photographic gifts I’ve been given was a viewing of Tod Papageorge’s “Passing Through Eden" read alongside some passages from the book of Genesis. Since then, I’ve been struck with some depictions of this biblical state of mind.

* * *

Aaron Canipe is a State Guide to North Carolina. He was born and raised in Hickory, North Carolina and received his BFA in photography from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. Aaron also helps operate Empty Stretch, a DIY-publisher and blog. He’s exhibited work throughout the South and has been published in the Washington Post and the Oxford American’s “Eye on the South” blog. Follow him on Tumblr at mysteriesmanners and see more work on his website, aaroncanipe.com.

HOUSES OF WORSHIP - NEW JERSEY

Worship in New Jersey is as various as the population itself, ranging from the guttural chants of the Greek Orthodoxy to the carefully accented English of the Episcopalians; from the enthusiastic disorder of revival meetings to the heavy dignity of urban churches; from crossroads houses of God to massive cathedrals.

New Jersey, A Guide To Its Present and Past (WPA, 1939)

Often the subject of negative stereotypes, New Jersey, for most Americans, conjures images of urban blight, organized crime, industrial pollution and concrete jungles. While some of that may be based in truth, it does not represent this great state. Most of New Jersey is suburban or rural and actually has more in common with middle America than with urban New York or Philadelphia.

As with the rest of America, churches dot the New Jersey landscape. Houses of worship are a contrast to the houses around them; their architecture, their interesting angles, and their often historical significance.

Guide Note: The diversity of the houses of worship shown here are a reflection of the diversity of New Jersey and, as such, a microcosm of the diversity of America.

  1. Orthodox Church, Howell New Jersey.
  2. Russian Orthodox Church, Jackson Township, New Jersey. 
  3. Al Masjid Al Zainee mosque, East Brunswick, New Jersey.
  4. Clarksburg United Methodist Church, Millstone Township, New Jersey.
  5. Church, Jackson Township, New Jersey.
  6. Princeton Baptist Church, Princeton, New Jersey. 
  7. Princeton Baptist Church, Princeton, New Jersey. 

* * *

North Carolina native Gregory Drew, who holds a B.A. degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, is documenting his adopted home of New Jersey. His goal is to destroy the unfair stereotypes and show the beauty and diversity of the state’s landscape and its people. He also hopes to someday give up his day job and focus on his photography full time as he travels around the USA and the world. You can follow Greg on Tumblr at http://randomlake.tumblr.com.

WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info
WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)


Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.
—Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)


I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.
* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.
Zoom Info

WITCHCRAFT - MAINE (and ENVIRONS)

Although there was a time when Maine witches were given their ‘comeuppance,’ therapeutic magic has been practiced throughout the State to this day.

Maine, A Guide Down East (WPA, 1937)

I was initially drawn to witchcraft as an intersection of feminism and spirituality. The photos themselves are less a typology then a sequence of people, sacred spaces, ritual practices and objects. Witchcraft is a diverse tradition, but the visual themes that connect my different subjects made it easy to sequence them together. In typical New-England sensibility, the visual signs are subtle- sometimes just a crystal necklace or a pentagram tattoo. Sometimes, wands and cloaks serve as more obvious markers.

* * *

Elicia Epstein is an aspiring journalist from Massachusetts. She studies Studio Art at Pomona College in California and has just finished a semester of photography at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine. Follow her on tumblr at http://www.tumblr.com/blog/lilisara or on her website at eliciaepstein.com. You can also say hi at elicia.epstein@gmail.com.

CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH
Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.
There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.
In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert. Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful. True believers descended on the new utopia.
They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 
They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.
"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.
In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife. 
The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.
In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.
Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

CHURCH ROCK, HIGHWAY 191 - EASTERN UTAH

Anyone who travels the section of Highway 191 between Monticello and Moab in eastern Utah can’t help but notice the solitary sandstone monument rising like a cathedral out of the dirt known as Church Rock. You also can’t help noticing the hole at the base of the rock.

There are various theories as to how that hole got there. Maybe it was carved out for a home, or blasted out by a rancher named Young to store salt licks, but the most enduring and engaging story involves Marie Ogden and her quest to build heaven on earth.

In 1933, Marie Ogden’s Utopian “Home of the Truth” and its community of nearly a hundred members moved onto a tract of land near the intersection of Highways 191 and 211. Ogden believed herself “divinely informed,” and communicated with God through a typewriter. It was one of these revelations that led the psychic to leave New Jersey and purchase 1,000 acres to farm in Utah’s barren high desert.

Another “automatic writing” prophesied a cataclysmic meltdown of the world, a transformation in southeastern Utah from arid desert to tropical paradise, and the “rebirth of society” from within the commune’s faithful.

True believers descended on the new utopia.

They also set out to hollow out, by hand, the entire center of the sandstone monument to build a church. 

They got as far as a 16 by 24 foot opening chiseled into the rock.

"Home of the Truth" itself (about a mile from Church Rock) was isolated from the surrounding community, its residents keeping to themselves in a strict, simple lifestyle. Because Ogden’s beliefs were similar to those of the Mormons—the dominant religious group in the area—the Utah State Historical Society reported they got along with people in the area.

In 1934, Ogden bought the newspaper the San Juan Record, and as publisher/editor she added a column on metaphysics. She received ongoing communication from God. Convinced she could raise the dead and having published articles about successes featuring four guinea pigs and a child, she offered promises of an afterlife.

The crisis that led to the eventual downfall of the Home of Truth resulted from Ogden’s very unsuccessful efforts to bring Edith Peshak, dead from cancer, back to life with salt baths and milk enemas. The investigations by local authorities and the intense media attention that followed drove most of the members to abandon the group by the end of 1937.

In 1975, at the age of 91, Marie Ogden died in a nursing home in Blanding, Utah.

Guide note: Satellite Image of Church Rock.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

THREE GIANT CROSSES - NICHOLAS COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

The search for religious liberty was one of the principal factors that led pioneer settlers, especially the Scotch-Irish and German, to West Virginia.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

West Virginian Nic Persinger turned to Field Assignment #3: History and #5: Architecture in his trusted #AmericanGuideWeek Field Manual and sends word of three giant crosses seen in the Nicholas County sky:

Growing up in the hills of West Virginia, many of my memories of traveling the state are lined with the sight of three giant crosses gracing the hilltops along the way to and from. These crosses scattered all over Appalachia and the rest of the U.S. are because of one man’s vision from God.
Coal tycoon turned devout fanatic, Bernard Coffindaffer received a “genuine, marvelous, glorious vision” from the Lord while recovering from open heart surgery in 1984. For the final nine years of his life that followed, he spent roughly $3,000,000 constructing and erecting these three crosses as a silent reminder of Jesus Christ and, what he thought would be, His soon coming return. Each piece of land used for Coffindaffer’s mission was forever deemed “Holy Land” by him and his followers once the crosses were blessed. The use of the land was simply on a permission basis to Coffindaffer from the land owner.
Throughout his calling, he was met with praise and criticism locally and nationally. Whether driven by divine insanity or the Holy Spirit, he never stopped. However in 1993, after assembling almost 2,000 sets of crosses in 29 states and having cents left in his bank account, Bernard Coffindaffer died of a heart attack at the age of 68. His legacy left for what or who ever was coming next.
Nowadays few Coffindaffers are left in Nicholas County, where I grew up. Even fewer are the reminders of this point man for God’s existence besides his U.S. Army gravestone. No plaques, no statues, and no mention of the Coffindaffer in conversation. Only his crosses remain as we drive to and from counting them along the way. 

* * *
Nic Persinger is a southern artist who lives in Morgantown, West Virginia. He studied photography at the Corcoran College of Art & Design in Washington, D.C. His work has been exhibited throughout the U.S. and has been published in magazines and artist books. Through medium format color photographs, Persinger documents the back roads of the rural South, ever mindful of the stories he grew up hearing from family and friends in the small, tightly-knit town of Richwood, West Virginia.  
Follow at nicpersinger.com and nicpersinger.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THREE GIANT CROSSES - NICHOLAS COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

The search for religious liberty was one of the principal factors that led pioneer settlers, especially the Scotch-Irish and German, to West Virginia.
—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

West Virginian Nic Persinger turned to Field Assignment #3: History and #5: Architecture in his trusted #AmericanGuideWeek Field Manual and sends word of three giant crosses seen in the Nicholas County sky:

Growing up in the hills of West Virginia, many of my memories of traveling the state are lined with the sight of three giant crosses gracing the hilltops along the way to and from. These crosses scattered all over Appalachia and the rest of the U.S. are because of one man’s vision from God.
Coal tycoon turned devout fanatic, Bernard Coffindaffer received a “genuine, marvelous, glorious vision” from the Lord while recovering from open heart surgery in 1984. For the final nine years of his life that followed, he spent roughly $3,000,000 constructing and erecting these three crosses as a silent reminder of Jesus Christ and, what he thought would be, His soon coming return. Each piece of land used for Coffindaffer’s mission was forever deemed “Holy Land” by him and his followers once the crosses were blessed. The use of the land was simply on a permission basis to Coffindaffer from the land owner.
Throughout his calling, he was met with praise and criticism locally and nationally. Whether driven by divine insanity or the Holy Spirit, he never stopped. However in 1993, after assembling almost 2,000 sets of crosses in 29 states and having cents left in his bank account, Bernard Coffindaffer died of a heart attack at the age of 68. His legacy left for what or who ever was coming next.
Nowadays few Coffindaffers are left in Nicholas County, where I grew up. Even fewer are the reminders of this point man for God’s existence besides his U.S. Army gravestone. No plaques, no statues, and no mention of the Coffindaffer in conversation. Only his crosses remain as we drive to and from counting them along the way. 

* * *
Nic Persinger is a southern artist who lives in Morgantown, West Virginia. He studied photography at the Corcoran College of Art & Design in Washington, D.C. His work has been exhibited throughout the U.S. and has been published in magazines and artist books. Through medium format color photographs, Persinger documents the back roads of the rural South, ever mindful of the stories he grew up hearing from family and friends in the small, tightly-knit town of Richwood, West Virginia.  
Follow at nicpersinger.com and nicpersinger.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

THREE GIANT CROSSES - NICHOLAS COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

The search for religious liberty was one of the principal factors that led pioneer settlers, especially the Scotch-Irish and German, to West Virginia.

—West Virginia: A Guide to the Mountain State (WPA, 1941)

West Virginian Nic Persinger turned to Field Assignment #3: History and #5: Architecture in his trusted #AmericanGuideWeek Field Manual and sends word of three giant crosses seen in the Nicholas County sky:

Growing up in the hills of West Virginia, many of my memories of traveling the state are lined with the sight of three giant crosses gracing the hilltops along the way to and from. These crosses scattered all over Appalachia and the rest of the U.S. are because of one man’s vision from God.

Coal tycoon turned devout fanatic, Bernard Coffindaffer received a “genuine, marvelous, glorious vision” from the Lord while recovering from open heart surgery in 1984. For the final nine years of his life that followed, he spent roughly $3,000,000 constructing and erecting these three crosses as a silent reminder of Jesus Christ and, what he thought would be, His soon coming return. Each piece of land used for Coffindaffer’s mission was forever deemed “Holy Land” by him and his followers once the crosses were blessed. The use of the land was simply on a permission basis to Coffindaffer from the land owner.

Throughout his calling, he was met with praise and criticism locally and nationally. Whether driven by divine insanity or the Holy Spirit, he never stopped. However in 1993, after assembling almost 2,000 sets of crosses in 29 states and having cents left in his bank account, Bernard Coffindaffer died of a heart attack at the age of 68. His legacy left for what or who ever was coming next.

Nowadays few Coffindaffers are left in Nicholas County, where I grew up. Even fewer are the reminders of this point man for God’s existence besides his U.S. Army gravestone. No plaques, no statues, and no mention of the Coffindaffer in conversation. Only his crosses remain as we drive to and from counting them along the way. 

* * *

Nic Persinger is a southern artist who lives in Morgantown, West Virginia. He studied photography at the Corcoran College of Art & Design in Washington, D.C. His work has been exhibited throughout the U.S. and has been published in magazines and artist books. Through medium format color photographs, Persinger documents the back roads of the rural South, ever mindful of the stories he grew up hearing from family and friends in the small, tightly-knit town of Richwood, West Virginia.  

Follow at nicpersinger.com and nicpersinger.tumblr.com.

FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info
FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE
AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.
The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.
Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.
Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °
Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.
Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com. 
Zoom Info

FORMER ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CHURCH and FIRST CHURCH - NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE

AG Week Field Assignment #6: Architecture in part asks prospective guides to:

List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work.

New Englander Alex Pendleton obliges and sends in this dispatch from Nashua, New Hampshire:  

These two buildings represent a small fraction of Nashua’s many religious structures.

The first was formerly (and popularly) known as the St. Francis Xavier Church, the tallest in Nashua. Built in 1898, it was closed in 2003. It was purchased and reopened by the Coptic Orthodox Church. Its immense size and presence are out of place in a relatively run-down area of the city.

Second: Nashua’s First Church, built in 1894 of granite from quarries in Marlboro, NH. Its bells were exhibited at the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition in 1983. It sits at the very top of Main St., and is hard to miss.

Even non-believers like myself can appreciate the beauty and craftsmanship of these buildings. The insides are equally impressive, but that may have to wait for next year’s guide.

° ° °

Alex Pendleton is a software developer and photographer living and shooting in Nashua, New Hampshire. He grew up in various states along the east coast, much of New England, and several regions of New Hampshire.

Follow on Tumblr at pendletronnh.tumblr.com

THE HINDU TEMPLE SOCIETY - QUEENS, NEW YORK

Did you know that in addition to American Guide Week, it’s Animal Week over at the amazing Atlas Obscura? If you haven’t seen the incredible Lake Monsters of America map, get over there now. In order to help celebrate Animal Week, we dug up an American Guide dispatch on the day an elephant walked the streets of Queens.

Amidst the detached houses and backyard kiddie pools of Flushing, Queens, the elephant-headed Lord Ganesha receives visitors and devotees to the Hindu Temple Society of North America’s Šri Mahã Vallabha Ganapati Devasthãnam. As the presiding deity and a prominent god in the Hindu pantheon, Lord Ganesha’s shrine sits at the focal point of the sunlit temple space.  

Ganesha, the son of Shiva, is the remover of obstacles and inspires intense devotion in the worshippers who come to ask his blessings. Temple-goers bring offerings on a daily basis, but for special occasions — such as Ganesha’s birthday, Ganesh Chaturthi — elaborate gifts of food are presented. In 1995, the “milk miracle” was witnessed at the Queens temple when brass statues of Ganesha reportedly drank milk offerings held under their trunks.

For particularly auspicious ceremonies like the consecration of altars or the infusion of divine energy into temple statues, a live elephant attends the festivities. Upon the Temple’s re-consecration in 2009, Minnie the elephant graciously accepted the respectful touches and offerings of an admiring crowd. (Minnie’s trainer mentioned that she also does weddings.)

You can see more photos and details on how to visit the Temple over at Atlas Obscura.

* * *

Atlas Obscura is the definitive guide to the world’s wondrous and curious places. If you’re searching for MINIATURE CITIESGLASS FLOWERSBOOKS BOUND IN HUMAN SKINGIGANTIC FLAMING HOLES IN THE GROUNDBONE CHURCHESBALANCING PAGODAS, or HOMES BUILT ENTIRELY OUT OF PAPER, Atlas Obscura is where you’ll find them.

Find them at AtlasObscura.com and follow them on Tumblr at atlasobscura.tumblr.com

AMERICAN GUIDE WEEK - QUESTIONNAIRE FOR FIELD REPORTS, ASSIGNMENT #6

Take Pride, It’s the American Guide

YOUR ASSIGNMENT, TRUSTED GUIDE:

The original American Guide series of books was produced by the federal government’s Works Progress Administration in the 1930s and ’40s. Your A/G editors unearthed the actual mimeographed field manual from 1935 that was sent out to each WPA state research office. Editors, researchers, and volunteers used the manual as a basis for collecting information on their district.

We’re asking you to do the same. Stay tuned all this week as we release 10 assignments drawn from the 1935 manual for the upcoming American Guide Week (Nov. 18-24). Use these questions as your guide for contributing #AmericanGuideWeek content. For your sixth assignment, Class III - Architecture.  (And yes, these are the actual questions from the manual.)

CLASS III - ARCHITECTURE (incl. RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS & STRUCTURES)

  • List churches in your district of special interest as regards: Architectural style; Choir; Organist; Paintings; Interesting relics; Stained glass windows; Sculpture; Woodwork; Stone work
  • Are there interesting examples of modern houses?
  • Is there a distinctive type of architecture well-represented in your district? (Ex. Adobe houses, colonial houses, plantation manors.)

BE A GUIDE. SHOW AMERICA TO AMERICANS. 

Between Monday, Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 24, tag your Tumblr photosillustrations and writing that answer these questions and describe the America you live in and the America you travel through — people, places and things.

Check out a couple of past A/G posts on architecture here and here. Now go out there and describe/photograph/draw what it’s like where you live. 

This is a collaboration, folks: a living, Tumblifying documentary about the USA. You’ll be reblogged or featured on The American Guide.

Check out A/G Week assignments here.

#americanguideweek

CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info
CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.
—New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 
* * *
Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.
Zoom Info

CHAUTAUQUA INSTITUTION - CHAUTAUQUA, NEW YORK 

In the southwestern corner of the State is the unique Chautauqua Institution, begun in 1873 as a summer training conference for Sunday school teachers but gradually developed into a nationally influential center of adult education.

New York, A Guide To the Empire State (WPA, 1940)

Guide Note: Still an institution of learning with a religious bent, some 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 142,000 attend scheduled public events. Over 8,000 students enroll annually in the Chautauqua Summer Schools which offer courses in art, music, dance, theater and writing skills. 

* * *

Hailing from Berea, OH, Benjamin S. Rogerson resurfaced in the Midwest after living in New Mexico and Alaska. From his home base in Chicago, he teaches film editing at Columbia College, explores the city shooting, and dreams of traveling to Patagonia. Follow Benjamin on Tumblr at fatsquirrelphotography.tumblr.com and find more of his work on his website, www.benrogerson.com.