RÍO GRANDE DEL NORTE NATIONAL MONUMENT, NEW MEXICO













Yucca, cactus, locoweed, vetch, wild gourd vines, purple verbena, bee balm, aster, chamiso and other wild flowers, including mallow and flowering grasses, give beauty to the foreground, while the hills and mountains in the distance make for greater loveliness, with sky and piling clouds over all.
— New Mexico, A Guide To the Colorful State (WPA, 1940)

On March 25, 2013, President Obama signed proclamations establishing five new national monuments, including two administered by the Bureau of Land Management:  the San Juan Islands National Monument in Washington and the Río Grande del Norte National Monument in New Mexico.
The Río Grande del Norte National Monument includes ecosystems and vegetation that exhibit significant diversity. A large expanse of the monument encompasses a big-game corridor stretching between the San Juan Mountains in the west and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in the east. The Río Grande provides habitat for fish such as the flathead chub and the Río Grande Cutthroat Trout, as well as for waterfowl, including ducks, geese, and coots.
Learn more about one of our newest monuments:  http://blm.gov/c2kd
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MyPublicLands is the official Tumblr of the Bureau of Land Management. Follow the next generation of BLMers as they share their experiences on the public lands. You can find them at mypubliclands.tumblr.com.
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RÍO GRANDE DEL NORTE NATIONAL MONUMENT, NEW MEXICO

Yucca, cactus, locoweed, vetch, wild gourd vines, purple verbena, bee balm, aster, chamiso and other wild flowers, including mallow and flowering grasses, give beauty to the foreground, while the hills and mountains in the distance make for greater loveliness, with sky and piling clouds over all.

New Mexico, A Guide To the Colorful State (WPA, 1940)

On March 25, 2013, President Obama signed proclamations establishing five new national monuments, including two administered by the Bureau of Land Management:  the San Juan Islands National Monument in Washington and the Río Grande del Norte National Monument in New Mexico.

The Río Grande del Norte National Monument includes ecosystems and vegetation that exhibit significant diversity. A large expanse of the monument encompasses a big-game corridor stretching between the San Juan Mountains in the west and the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in the east. The Río Grande provides habitat for fish such as the flathead chub and the Río Grande Cutthroat Trout, as well as for waterfowl, including ducks, geese, and coots.

Learn more about one of our newest monuments:  http://blm.gov/c2kd

* * *

MyPublicLands is the official Tumblr of the Bureau of Land Management. Follow the next generation of BLMers as they share their experiences on the public lands. You can find them at mypubliclands.tumblr.com.