HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 
—Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.
Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.
The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.
After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   
Editor’s Note: Read More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com
Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself — 

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532
Phone: 435-686-2250
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
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HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 
—Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.
Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.
The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.
After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   
Editor’s Note: Read More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com
Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself — 

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532
Phone: 435-686-2250
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 
—Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.
Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.
The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.
After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   
Editor’s Note: Read More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com
Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself — 

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532
Phone: 435-686-2250
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 
—Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.
Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.
The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.
After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   
Editor’s Note: Read More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com
Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself — 

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532
Phone: 435-686-2250
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 
—Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.
Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.
The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.
After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   
Editor’s Note: Read More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com
Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself — 

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532
Phone: 435-686-2250
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 
—Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.
Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.
The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.
After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   
Editor’s Note: Read More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com
Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself — 

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532
Phone: 435-686-2250
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 
—Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.
Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.
The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.
After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   
Editor’s Note: Read More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com
Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself — 

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532
Phone: 435-686-2250
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 
—Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.
Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.
The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.
After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   
Editor’s Note: Read More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com
Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself — 

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532
Phone: 435-686-2250
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 
—Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.
Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.
The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.
After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   
Editor’s Note: Read More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com
Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself — 

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532
Phone: 435-686-2250
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

HOLE N” THE ROCK - SOUTH OF MOAB, UTAH

Even today, as the State settles down to gray hairs, there lingers something wonderful and outrageous about Utah, a flavor of the mysterious and strange. 

Utah: A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

Many roadside attractions look interesting from the highway, and disappoint when you pull over.  Hole N” the Rock is not one of them.

Located twelve miles south of Moab, Utah, on Highway 191, Hole N” the Rock is a unique 5,000 square foot home carved out of a red sandstone monolith.  The attraction also includes historic sculptures by founder Albert Christensen, a gift shop, and a small but tidy zoo.

The excavation of the rock began as part of a family home for Niels and Jean Christensen, who settled in the area in the 1920s.  The Christensens had five sons and two daughters.  They blasted out a small alcove in the rock to serve as a bedroom for their boys.

After that, the timeline gets a little hazy.   

Editor’s NoteRead More Hole N” the Rock history — from prohibition bootlegging all the way to the modern-day — over at your Guide to the West Amadee Ricketts’s Tumblr, textless.tumblr.com

Guide Note: See Hole N” the Rock for yourself —

Address: 11037 S Hwy 191, Moab, Utah 84532

Phone: 435-686-2250

Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 
Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.
County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).
But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR - FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO 

Every August, Farmington, New Mexico, is home to the largest  county fair in the state. The San Juan County Fair has all of the things you find at most big county fairs: lots of livestock, live entertainment, handicrafts, art, and home economics displays. A midway, with rides and games. And fair food in all of its glory.

County fairs all over the United States are part of a remarkable tradition.  They are celebrations of community, agriculture, and the arts. They highlight the local and regional specialties that are still going strong in an increasingly standardized age. They’re one of the few places where everyone is invited to share the things they make and do—from flower arranging to woodworking, and maybe win a ribbon for it, too. Some of the best parts of county fairs are organized by volunteers (many of them affiliated with 4-H).

But the San Juan County Fair is special. There is a good sized fair just to the north, in La Plata County, Colorado. Otherwise, most of the nearby fairs on both sides of the state line are very small and almost entirely focused on agriculture. So the fair in Farmington draws families and exhibitors from all over northwest New Mexico, including parts of the Navajo Nation. In an area that often feels divided along cultural lines, the fair brings people together in a way nothing else does.

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO
Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.
I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 
I have not done any of those things.
For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.
Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SUMMER IN PURGATORY - DURANGO MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO

Purgatory Ski Area opened in 1965, and helped Durango, a small town in southwest Colorado, move from a summer tourist destination to a prosperous town with a year-round economy.  After decades of ups and downs, the resort was sold in 2000 and renamed Durango Mountain Resort.  Locals still tend to call it Purgatory.

I love to go up during the off season. Of course the resort offers all kinds of official summer activities…  You can ride up on the ski lift and slide down a giant slide, or go mountain biking on a huge network of trails.  You can ride a bungee trampoline or a zipline, or climb into a plastic ball-shaped thing that lets you walk on water. 

I have not done any of those things.

For me, DMR means spectacular views, great hiking, and unparalleled access to the San Juan National Forest.  The flowers and wildlife are pretty great, too.

Once you get a few hundred yards from the main roads and attractions, you rarely see another person.  But you may see a bear, or a herd of deer.  And you will definitely be glad you came.

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetery groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 
Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.
The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.) Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein. The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets.  Guide Notes: 
Several of the photos of Old Man Gloom burning were taken by fellow At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf. You can see more of his work at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Read more about the record-setting Zozobra.
Read more about Aztec Fiesta Days 2013.  
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

BURNING OLD MAN GLOOM - AZTEC, NEW MEXICO 

Each June, people gather to burn an effigy of Old Man Gloom in Aztec, New Mexico. The event is a symbolic way to banish the worries and cares of the previous year, which are written on slips of paper and burned along with the Old Man.

The burning of Old Man Gloom has been part of Aztec Fiesta Days for at least forty years. It was inspired by the burning of Zozobra, also sometimes called Old Man Gloom, an annual event in Santa Fe since 1924. The Zozobra is nearly 50 feet tall with moving arms. (The one that burned in 2007 found a place in the Guinness World Records as the biggest marionette in the world, though it was displaced by a taller Canadian marionette the following year.)

Aztec’s Old Man Gloom is smaller and not animated. But it is still an impressive 14 feet tall: a metal frame wrapped with chicken wire and mounted on metal poles for lifting and carrying. Before it is burned each year, it is dressed and decorated by members of the Aztec High School Key Club, with help from faculty advisor Debbie Klein.

The Key Club in Aztec participates in all kinds of civic events, particularly fundraisers for charities benefiting kids. Dressing and burning Old Man Gloom is just one more way for the Key Club to give back to the community.

Tens of thousands of people attend the annual burning of Zozobra in Santa Fe. Aztec draws more like a hundred people, which means you can put your gloom directly in the figure and stand right in the front row for the lighting. The whoosh of heat when it catches fire is startling. People bang drums and cheer while it burns away. Then they go home.

Aztec Fiesta Days also features a carnival, a car show, a community breakfast and a parade for children and pets. 

Guide Notes

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

SOMEWHERE OVER THE WEST

“I really don’t know one plane from the other. To me they are all just marginal costs with wings.”
-Alfred Kahn, airline economist (1917-2010)

Commercial air travel has changed a lot over the years. Since the US airline industry was deregulated in 1978, fares have dropped and lots more people have been flying. Airlines have merged and morphed and vanished. The rise of hub-and-spoke airline systems means that a major delay at one important airport can ripple across the country for days.
What hasn’t changed is the incredible vastness and variety of the country you see out the window. On a recent round trip from southern Colorado to Portland, Oregon (via Phoenix), I saw the Grand Canyon and the Colorado river valley, tract housing as far as the eye could see, and irrigation circles laid out like giant board games in the desert. I saw dormant volcanoes in Oregon and a bird’s eye view of the oil fields of the San Juan Basin in northwest New Mexico.
Commercial flight is the only way most of us will ever get to see those wide, wide views. Every time I fly, those views remind me of all the thousands of places in the US that I haven’t been to yet. And that takes the sting out of the scores of little annoyances along the way. 
Because wow, America.
Guide Notes:
Read about the history of commercial flight in the US at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s America By Air exhibit. 
Read about Alfred Kahn, who headed up the Civil Aeronautics Board that oversaw airline deregulation, in his obituary from The Economist (January 20, 2011).

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOMEWHERE OVER THE WEST

“I really don’t know one plane from the other. To me they are all just marginal costs with wings.”
-Alfred Kahn, airline economist (1917-2010)

Commercial air travel has changed a lot over the years. Since the US airline industry was deregulated in 1978, fares have dropped and lots more people have been flying. Airlines have merged and morphed and vanished. The rise of hub-and-spoke airline systems means that a major delay at one important airport can ripple across the country for days.
What hasn’t changed is the incredible vastness and variety of the country you see out the window. On a recent round trip from southern Colorado to Portland, Oregon (via Phoenix), I saw the Grand Canyon and the Colorado river valley, tract housing as far as the eye could see, and irrigation circles laid out like giant board games in the desert. I saw dormant volcanoes in Oregon and a bird’s eye view of the oil fields of the San Juan Basin in northwest New Mexico.
Commercial flight is the only way most of us will ever get to see those wide, wide views. Every time I fly, those views remind me of all the thousands of places in the US that I haven’t been to yet. And that takes the sting out of the scores of little annoyances along the way. 
Because wow, America.
Guide Notes:
Read about the history of commercial flight in the US at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s America By Air exhibit. 
Read about Alfred Kahn, who headed up the Civil Aeronautics Board that oversaw airline deregulation, in his obituary from The Economist (January 20, 2011).

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOMEWHERE OVER THE WEST

“I really don’t know one plane from the other. To me they are all just marginal costs with wings.”
-Alfred Kahn, airline economist (1917-2010)

Commercial air travel has changed a lot over the years. Since the US airline industry was deregulated in 1978, fares have dropped and lots more people have been flying. Airlines have merged and morphed and vanished. The rise of hub-and-spoke airline systems means that a major delay at one important airport can ripple across the country for days.
What hasn’t changed is the incredible vastness and variety of the country you see out the window. On a recent round trip from southern Colorado to Portland, Oregon (via Phoenix), I saw the Grand Canyon and the Colorado river valley, tract housing as far as the eye could see, and irrigation circles laid out like giant board games in the desert. I saw dormant volcanoes in Oregon and a bird’s eye view of the oil fields of the San Juan Basin in northwest New Mexico.
Commercial flight is the only way most of us will ever get to see those wide, wide views. Every time I fly, those views remind me of all the thousands of places in the US that I haven’t been to yet. And that takes the sting out of the scores of little annoyances along the way. 
Because wow, America.
Guide Notes:
Read about the history of commercial flight in the US at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s America By Air exhibit. 
Read about Alfred Kahn, who headed up the Civil Aeronautics Board that oversaw airline deregulation, in his obituary from The Economist (January 20, 2011).

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOMEWHERE OVER THE WEST

“I really don’t know one plane from the other. To me they are all just marginal costs with wings.”
-Alfred Kahn, airline economist (1917-2010)

Commercial air travel has changed a lot over the years. Since the US airline industry was deregulated in 1978, fares have dropped and lots more people have been flying. Airlines have merged and morphed and vanished. The rise of hub-and-spoke airline systems means that a major delay at one important airport can ripple across the country for days.
What hasn’t changed is the incredible vastness and variety of the country you see out the window. On a recent round trip from southern Colorado to Portland, Oregon (via Phoenix), I saw the Grand Canyon and the Colorado river valley, tract housing as far as the eye could see, and irrigation circles laid out like giant board games in the desert. I saw dormant volcanoes in Oregon and a bird’s eye view of the oil fields of the San Juan Basin in northwest New Mexico.
Commercial flight is the only way most of us will ever get to see those wide, wide views. Every time I fly, those views remind me of all the thousands of places in the US that I haven’t been to yet. And that takes the sting out of the scores of little annoyances along the way. 
Because wow, America.
Guide Notes:
Read about the history of commercial flight in the US at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s America By Air exhibit. 
Read about Alfred Kahn, who headed up the Civil Aeronautics Board that oversaw airline deregulation, in his obituary from The Economist (January 20, 2011).

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOMEWHERE OVER THE WEST

“I really don’t know one plane from the other. To me they are all just marginal costs with wings.”
-Alfred Kahn, airline economist (1917-2010)

Commercial air travel has changed a lot over the years. Since the US airline industry was deregulated in 1978, fares have dropped and lots more people have been flying. Airlines have merged and morphed and vanished. The rise of hub-and-spoke airline systems means that a major delay at one important airport can ripple across the country for days.
What hasn’t changed is the incredible vastness and variety of the country you see out the window. On a recent round trip from southern Colorado to Portland, Oregon (via Phoenix), I saw the Grand Canyon and the Colorado river valley, tract housing as far as the eye could see, and irrigation circles laid out like giant board games in the desert. I saw dormant volcanoes in Oregon and a bird’s eye view of the oil fields of the San Juan Basin in northwest New Mexico.
Commercial flight is the only way most of us will ever get to see those wide, wide views. Every time I fly, those views remind me of all the thousands of places in the US that I haven’t been to yet. And that takes the sting out of the scores of little annoyances along the way. 
Because wow, America.
Guide Notes:
Read about the history of commercial flight in the US at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s America By Air exhibit. 
Read about Alfred Kahn, who headed up the Civil Aeronautics Board that oversaw airline deregulation, in his obituary from The Economist (January 20, 2011).

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOMEWHERE OVER THE WEST

“I really don’t know one plane from the other. To me they are all just marginal costs with wings.”
-Alfred Kahn, airline economist (1917-2010)

Commercial air travel has changed a lot over the years. Since the US airline industry was deregulated in 1978, fares have dropped and lots more people have been flying. Airlines have merged and morphed and vanished. The rise of hub-and-spoke airline systems means that a major delay at one important airport can ripple across the country for days.
What hasn’t changed is the incredible vastness and variety of the country you see out the window. On a recent round trip from southern Colorado to Portland, Oregon (via Phoenix), I saw the Grand Canyon and the Colorado river valley, tract housing as far as the eye could see, and irrigation circles laid out like giant board games in the desert. I saw dormant volcanoes in Oregon and a bird’s eye view of the oil fields of the San Juan Basin in northwest New Mexico.
Commercial flight is the only way most of us will ever get to see those wide, wide views. Every time I fly, those views remind me of all the thousands of places in the US that I haven’t been to yet. And that takes the sting out of the scores of little annoyances along the way. 
Because wow, America.
Guide Notes:
Read about the history of commercial flight in the US at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s America By Air exhibit. 
Read about Alfred Kahn, who headed up the Civil Aeronautics Board that oversaw airline deregulation, in his obituary from The Economist (January 20, 2011).

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOMEWHERE OVER THE WEST

“I really don’t know one plane from the other. To me they are all just marginal costs with wings.”
-Alfred Kahn, airline economist (1917-2010)

Commercial air travel has changed a lot over the years. Since the US airline industry was deregulated in 1978, fares have dropped and lots more people have been flying. Airlines have merged and morphed and vanished. The rise of hub-and-spoke airline systems means that a major delay at one important airport can ripple across the country for days.
What hasn’t changed is the incredible vastness and variety of the country you see out the window. On a recent round trip from southern Colorado to Portland, Oregon (via Phoenix), I saw the Grand Canyon and the Colorado river valley, tract housing as far as the eye could see, and irrigation circles laid out like giant board games in the desert. I saw dormant volcanoes in Oregon and a bird’s eye view of the oil fields of the San Juan Basin in northwest New Mexico.
Commercial flight is the only way most of us will ever get to see those wide, wide views. Every time I fly, those views remind me of all the thousands of places in the US that I haven’t been to yet. And that takes the sting out of the scores of little annoyances along the way. 
Because wow, America.
Guide Notes:
Read about the history of commercial flight in the US at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s America By Air exhibit. 
Read about Alfred Kahn, who headed up the Civil Aeronautics Board that oversaw airline deregulation, in his obituary from The Economist (January 20, 2011).

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
SOMEWHERE OVER THE WEST

“I really don’t know one plane from the other. To me they are all just marginal costs with wings.”
-Alfred Kahn, airline economist (1917-2010)

Commercial air travel has changed a lot over the years. Since the US airline industry was deregulated in 1978, fares have dropped and lots more people have been flying. Airlines have merged and morphed and vanished. The rise of hub-and-spoke airline systems means that a major delay at one important airport can ripple across the country for days.
What hasn’t changed is the incredible vastness and variety of the country you see out the window. On a recent round trip from southern Colorado to Portland, Oregon (via Phoenix), I saw the Grand Canyon and the Colorado river valley, tract housing as far as the eye could see, and irrigation circles laid out like giant board games in the desert. I saw dormant volcanoes in Oregon and a bird’s eye view of the oil fields of the San Juan Basin in northwest New Mexico.
Commercial flight is the only way most of us will ever get to see those wide, wide views. Every time I fly, those views remind me of all the thousands of places in the US that I haven’t been to yet. And that takes the sting out of the scores of little annoyances along the way. 
Because wow, America.
Guide Notes:
Read about the history of commercial flight in the US at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s America By Air exhibit. 
Read about Alfred Kahn, who headed up the Civil Aeronautics Board that oversaw airline deregulation, in his obituary from The Economist (January 20, 2011).

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

SOMEWHERE OVER THE WEST

“I really don’t know one plane from the other. To me they are all just marginal costs with wings.”

-Alfred Kahn, airline economist (1917-2010)

Commercial air travel has changed a lot over the years. Since the US airline industry was deregulated in 1978, fares have dropped and lots more people have been flying. Airlines have merged and morphed and vanished. The rise of hub-and-spoke airline systems means that a major delay at one important airport can ripple across the country for days.

What hasn’t changed is the incredible vastness and variety of the country you see out the window. On a recent round trip from southern Colorado to Portland, Oregon (via Phoenix), I saw the Grand Canyon and the Colorado river valley, tract housing as far as the eye could see, and irrigation circles laid out like giant board games in the desert. I saw dormant volcanoes in Oregon and a bird’s eye view of the oil fields of the San Juan Basin in northwest New Mexico.

Commercial flight is the only way most of us will ever get to see those wide, wide views. Every time I fly, those views remind me of all the thousands of places in the US that I haven’t been to yet. And that takes the sting out of the scores of little annoyances along the way. 

Because wow, America.

Guide Notes:

Read about the history of commercial flight in the US at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s America By Air exhibit. 

Read about Alfred Kahn, who headed up the Civil Aeronautics Board that oversaw airline deregulation, in his obituary from The Economist (January 20, 2011).

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO
Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 
When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).
Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.
It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:
Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”
The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.
But it is still well worth the trip.
* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

ANGEL PEAK SCENIC AREA - NEW MEXICO

Angel Peak Scenic Area, south of Bloomfield, NM, is a bit like the Grand Canyon in that it doesn’t look like much until you actually get there.  Angel Peak itself is over 7,000 feet tall, so you can see it from miles away.  But from a distance it just looks like a smallish, rocky mountain. 

When you get close, the plateau falls away and you see the 10,000 acres of spectacular, surreal badlands that make up the scenic area managed by the Bureau of Land Management.  The area has been open to natural gas development for decades.  Drilling and extraction operations are plainly visible, but the landscape is still awe inspiring.  And the energy infrastructure makes the canyon itself very accessible (though driving in calls for GPS, plenty of water, and a high clearance vehicle).

Last summer was the first time I noticed a new kind of development in the area near Angel Peak.  It didn’t stand out much at the time, but it was called a landfarm and seemed to involve lots of bulldozers.  When I visited again in March 2013, I got a much clearer look.

It turns out that a landfarm operation, like this complex managed by Envirotech, is a place where “soil remediation” takes place.  This is where contaminated soil from all over the San Juan Basin oil fields is processed by covering it with other soil.  High Country News described the landfarm like this:

Don’t look for fresh produce: This is where contaminated soils from the energy industry are plowed back into the earth and treated, or, as they say, “farmed.”

The landfarm consists of several hundred fenced acres of bare dirt on the sage plain you cross to get from Highway 550 to Angel Peak on County Road 7175.  There is no going around it.  On a windy day the blowing dust smells strongly of chemicals.

But it is still well worth the trip.

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

THE PINTO BEAN CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

In his younger days Zane Grey, writer of western fiction, lived for a time in Dove Creek, and much of his novel Riders of the Purple Sage is said to have been written here. There are several elderly townsfolk who identify themselves with characters in the book.
- Colorado, A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)





Dove Creek, Colorado is the Pinto Bean Capital of the World.  The biggest landmark near the town is an enormous bean elevator that can be seen from miles around.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE PINTO BEAN CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

In his younger days Zane Grey, writer of western fiction, lived for a time in Dove Creek, and much of his novel Riders of the Purple Sage is said to have been written here. There are several elderly townsfolk who identify themselves with characters in the book.
- Colorado, A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)





Dove Creek, Colorado is the Pinto Bean Capital of the World.  The biggest landmark near the town is an enormous bean elevator that can be seen from miles around.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE PINTO BEAN CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

In his younger days Zane Grey, writer of western fiction, lived for a time in Dove Creek, and much of his novel Riders of the Purple Sage is said to have been written here. There are several elderly townsfolk who identify themselves with characters in the book.
- Colorado, A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)





Dove Creek, Colorado is the Pinto Bean Capital of the World.  The biggest landmark near the town is an enormous bean elevator that can be seen from miles around.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE PINTO BEAN CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

In his younger days Zane Grey, writer of western fiction, lived for a time in Dove Creek, and much of his novel Riders of the Purple Sage is said to have been written here. There are several elderly townsfolk who identify themselves with characters in the book.
- Colorado, A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)





Dove Creek, Colorado is the Pinto Bean Capital of the World.  The biggest landmark near the town is an enormous bean elevator that can be seen from miles around.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE PINTO BEAN CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

In his younger days Zane Grey, writer of western fiction, lived for a time in Dove Creek, and much of his novel Riders of the Purple Sage is said to have been written here. There are several elderly townsfolk who identify themselves with characters in the book.
- Colorado, A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)





Dove Creek, Colorado is the Pinto Bean Capital of the World.  The biggest landmark near the town is an enormous bean elevator that can be seen from miles around.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
THE PINTO BEAN CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

In his younger days Zane Grey, writer of western fiction, lived for a time in Dove Creek, and much of his novel Riders of the Purple Sage is said to have been written here. There are several elderly townsfolk who identify themselves with characters in the book.
- Colorado, A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)





Dove Creek, Colorado is the Pinto Bean Capital of the World.  The biggest landmark near the town is an enormous bean elevator that can be seen from miles around.
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

THE PINTO BEAN CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

In his younger days Zane Grey, writer of western fiction, lived for a time in Dove Creek, and much of his novel Riders of the Purple Sage is said to have been written here. There are several elderly townsfolk who identify themselves with characters in the book.

Colorado, A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)

Dove Creek, Colorado is the Pinto Bean Capital of the World.  The biggest landmark near the town is an enormous bean elevator that can be seen from miles around.

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)

Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 

Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.

But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 

[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.

Let Amadee Ricketts (aka textless on Tumblr) be your guide to Gasland, New Mexico.
For #AmericanGuideWeek, Amadee writes:


San Juan County, New Mexico
Northern New Mexico is crisscrossed with hundreds of miles of dirt roads built over the last 60 years to provide wilderness access to oil and gas companies.  The roads provide access to beautiful places that are visibly ruined by the access.
All of these photos were taken in San Juan County.  Less than 6% of the land in the county is privately owned.  The area is full of amazing artifacts, gorgeous rock formations, and cows grazing on arid BLM land. It’s lovelier than lots of national parks.
If you ever get a chance to visit, bring plenty of water and prepare to be awed, saddened, and totally hooked.


* * *
Follow Amadee/textless on Tumblr. 
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Let Amadee Ricketts (aka textless on Tumblr) be your guide to Gasland, New Mexico.
For #AmericanGuideWeek, Amadee writes:


San Juan County, New Mexico
Northern New Mexico is crisscrossed with hundreds of miles of dirt roads built over the last 60 years to provide wilderness access to oil and gas companies.  The roads provide access to beautiful places that are visibly ruined by the access.
All of these photos were taken in San Juan County.  Less than 6% of the land in the county is privately owned.  The area is full of amazing artifacts, gorgeous rock formations, and cows grazing on arid BLM land. It’s lovelier than lots of national parks.
If you ever get a chance to visit, bring plenty of water and prepare to be awed, saddened, and totally hooked.


* * *
Follow Amadee/textless on Tumblr. 
Zoom Info
Let Amadee Ricketts (aka textless on Tumblr) be your guide to Gasland, New Mexico.
For #AmericanGuideWeek, Amadee writes:


San Juan County, New Mexico
Northern New Mexico is crisscrossed with hundreds of miles of dirt roads built over the last 60 years to provide wilderness access to oil and gas companies.  The roads provide access to beautiful places that are visibly ruined by the access.
All of these photos were taken in San Juan County.  Less than 6% of the land in the county is privately owned.  The area is full of amazing artifacts, gorgeous rock formations, and cows grazing on arid BLM land. It’s lovelier than lots of national parks.
If you ever get a chance to visit, bring plenty of water and prepare to be awed, saddened, and totally hooked.


* * *
Follow Amadee/textless on Tumblr. 
Zoom Info
Let Amadee Ricketts (aka textless on Tumblr) be your guide to Gasland, New Mexico.
For #AmericanGuideWeek, Amadee writes:


San Juan County, New Mexico
Northern New Mexico is crisscrossed with hundreds of miles of dirt roads built over the last 60 years to provide wilderness access to oil and gas companies.  The roads provide access to beautiful places that are visibly ruined by the access.
All of these photos were taken in San Juan County.  Less than 6% of the land in the county is privately owned.  The area is full of amazing artifacts, gorgeous rock formations, and cows grazing on arid BLM land. It’s lovelier than lots of national parks.
If you ever get a chance to visit, bring plenty of water and prepare to be awed, saddened, and totally hooked.


* * *
Follow Amadee/textless on Tumblr. 
Zoom Info
Let Amadee Ricketts (aka textless on Tumblr) be your guide to Gasland, New Mexico.
For #AmericanGuideWeek, Amadee writes:


San Juan County, New Mexico
Northern New Mexico is crisscrossed with hundreds of miles of dirt roads built over the last 60 years to provide wilderness access to oil and gas companies.  The roads provide access to beautiful places that are visibly ruined by the access.
All of these photos were taken in San Juan County.  Less than 6% of the land in the county is privately owned.  The area is full of amazing artifacts, gorgeous rock formations, and cows grazing on arid BLM land. It’s lovelier than lots of national parks.
If you ever get a chance to visit, bring plenty of water and prepare to be awed, saddened, and totally hooked.


* * *
Follow Amadee/textless on Tumblr. 
Zoom Info

Let Amadee Ricketts (aka textless on Tumblr) be your guide to Gasland, New Mexico.

For #AmericanGuideWeek, Amadee writes:

San Juan County, New Mexico

Northern New Mexico is crisscrossed with hundreds of miles of dirt roads built over the last 60 years to provide wilderness access to oil and gas companies.  The roads provide access to beautiful places that are visibly ruined by the access.

All of these photos were taken in San Juan County.  Less than 6% of the land in the county is privately owned.  The area is full of amazing artifacts, gorgeous rock formations, and cows grazing on arid BLM land. It’s lovelier than lots of national parks.

If you ever get a chance to visit, bring plenty of water and prepare to be awed, saddened, and totally hooked.

* * *

Follow Amadee/textless on Tumblr.