ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info
ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock
—Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.
Zoom Info

ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH 

Arches National Monument lies in the redrock country north of Moab, between the Colorado River and US 160. … In the Monument proper, the wind has carved these canyon walls into forms that, even in a region noted for spectacular erosion, are remarkable. Here are arches and windows through solid stone, from a size that can scarcely be crawled through to immense spans that would accommodate a troop of cavalry; monoliths measured in hundreds of tons balanced on decaying bases; chimneys, deep caves, and high, thin, sculptured walls of salmon-hued rock

Utah, A Guide to the State (WPA, 1941)

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

THE CALIFORNIA ZEPHYR - STATION TO STATION

When I lived in Cleveland I had taken Amtrak to DC for the President’s inauguration in 2009 and to visit friends in NYC during my summers off from school. Covering ground by rail always had this alternate traveler experience due to the fact that there are no advertisements on the train and the rail lines often run behind the highway. There are no billboards to look at outside (or any directed at you).

A few years ago when I planned to move to San Francisco it occurred to me that if I flew there I would essentially never see or experience a good three-fourths of the country. I’d never been past Chicago up until that point and had no concept of what the west was like and so this is when I decided to take Amtrak to California. 

One of the most striking things that occurred to me on this part of the route was how the train eventually meandered away from any form of civilization. At certain points I realized the train was traveling past old ghost towns that were built along the rail line. Instead of looking at industrial scenes or buildings or towns, I instead was paying attention to the rock formations or types of crops we were zooming past.

* * *

Zak Long is a State Guide to California and his home state of Ohio.  Born in Cleveland, OH, and now residing in San Francisco, CA,  much of his photography and videography explore first hand accounts of American rail travel. You can follow him on his personal Tumblr, zaklong.tumblr.comand also on UC Research.

* * *

THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: the West.

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here] 

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info
TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION
The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.   
Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.
Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.”  
Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks. 
Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.
* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *
THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   
Zoom Info

TWO GUNS, ARIZONA - STATION TO STATION

The sheer amount of hucksterism, fires, shootings, cultural atrocities, failed businesses, robbery and general western mayhem that have cursed this piece of desert reads like a history of Arizona itself.  

Two Guns started life as Canyon Diablo and was nothing much more than a shortcut to Winslow through a canyon that flooded every year, making it impassible. Then, around 1910, a bridge was built over the canyon and it became part of the National Old Trails Road (AKA the Ocean-to-Ocean Highway) that went from New York City to San Francisco.  In 1926, the southwest portion of the road was designated as U.S. Highway 66 — both the iconic Route 66 and the future Two Guns tourist attraction were born.

Assorted ruins from the history of the property still stand, most notably the zoo of Fort Two Guns built along the canyon by Harry “Indian” Miller, who advertised himself as “Chief Crazy Thunder.” 

Miller also created a tourist attraction in a nearby cave that was the site of an 1878 mass execution of 42 Apaches and their horses. It had been part of a raid on Navajo land and they were burned alive by the Navajo as retribution.  He called it “Mystery Cave” and created his own fake ruins — both inside the cave and above it — offering guided tours as well as a gift shop selling the bones of the dead Apaches and cold soft drinks.

Guide Note: Located thirty miles east of Flagstaff at exit 230 on I-40, look for the abandoned yellow roofed KOA on the south side of the highway to find one of the most worthwhile stops you can make between Flagstaff and Gallup.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and roughshelter.com.

* * *

THE AMERICAN GUIDE is joining STATION TO STATION for a cross-country train ride. Passing through: Arizona. 

Follow your guide along the rails and see America. [Track A/G’s trip here]   

WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info
WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info
WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info
WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info
WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info
WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.
—Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers.  
Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.
The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents.  
Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction. 
Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 
Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning
(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)
* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.
Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com. 
Zoom Info

WOMEN COAL MINERS - POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

Although called the land of the cowboy, Wyoming is by no means solely a man’s country. Its great seal bears the words ‘Equal Rights.’ Here women have shared the adventures, hardships, and accomplishments with men.

Wyoming, A Guide To Its History, Highways, and People (WPA, 1941)

Coal mined in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana accounts for more than 40 percent of U.S. coal production. The 12 active mines in the Wyoming portion of the basin are centered around Gillette, Wyoming, the self-proclaimed “Energy Capital of the Nation.” The coal mines of the Powder River Basin directly employ approximately 6000 workers. 

Women began employment at the coal mines soon after Belle Ayr Mine opened in the early 1970s. At first, the small percentage of women employees were mostly in clerical and administrative positions, but the number of women working in production soon increased as other large mines opened in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Most figures today state that women make up about 20 percent of all production crews in the coal mines of northeast Wyoming.

The Campbell County Rockpile Museum in Gillette, Wyoming is currently hosting a new exhibit, Women Coal Miners of the Powder River Basin, examining gender and culture in what is often seen as a masculinized profession.  Featuring the photographs of Annalise Shingler, this exhibit shares the stories of fifteen women coal miners and officially opened on July 9, 2013 with a presentation by Dr. Jessica Smith Rolston, author of the upcoming book Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West.  Rolston—a native of Gillette and the daughter of a mine mechanic—did her research through participant observation at four mines in the PRB, interviewing numerous miners, managers, families, ranchers, and residents. 

Dr. Rolston argues that the coal mines of the Powder River Basin are a “success story for integrating women into a non-traditional field.” She cites as evidence the 20 percent of women on work crews in the PRB—significantly higher than the eight percent average nationally—and the fact that, generally, women in the West have high workplace satisfaction.

Rolston found that women used two different approaches to making relationships in the workplace: some diminished the significance of gender, while others emphasized its importance. Rolston says women are negotiating between the two strategies on an everyday basis, but their male co-workers are also adjusting to changes in the workplace. The need for workers has led to “less restrictive notions of gender” and this unique dynamic has “played a key role in the rapid expansion of the energy industry in the American West.” 

Images - Annalise Shingler; Words - Robert Henning

(Special thanks to A/G Guide Christine Tharp for coordinating this dispatch)

* * *

Robert Henning is The Rockpile Museum registrar and curator of the coal mining exhibit.  He hails from Iowa, holds a master’s degree in museum studies, and currently lives in Gillette.

Annalise Shingler currently lives and works in Denver, Colorado. By day she’s a teacher, by night she’s a whole person involved in fitness, art-making and sometimes fascinated by delicious tea and Marvel superheroes. Find more of her photography and art at annaliseshingler.com

WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info
WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)
Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 
Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.
But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 
[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]
* * *
Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.
Zoom Info

WELCOME TO CORTEZ

CORTEZ, 200.5 m.  (6,198 alt., 921 pop.), seat of Montezuma County, is a trading center for sheep and cattle raisers who pasture their herds on the sage flats to the west.  The town was founded in 1887 when ranchers first pushed into the Montezuma Valley; many of the tan sandstone buildings were erected during that period.  Cortez is interesting on Saturday nights, when its main street is filled with ranchers, farmers, and Indians; the latter are usually dressed in brilliant velveteens and calicoes, and aglitter with silver and turquoise jewelry. (…) The majority are Ute, although there is a sprinkling of Navaho and Piute.

— Colorado: A Guide To the Highest State (WPA, 1941)

Today Cortez is a town of 8,500 people.  It is still the seat of Montezuma County, in the southwest corner of Colorado.  The main industries are tourism, energy, and agriculture, and Saturday nights tend to be quiet. 

Most tourists who visit Cortez are headed for Mesa Verde National Park.  And don’t get me wrong, Mesa Verde is great.  Along with the famous cliff dwellings, the park has an old school museum, the Chapin Mesa Archaeological Museum, full of dioramas and displays made by Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers in the 1930s.  There’s also a sweet new visitor center right at the park entrance.  And from the top of the mesa, you can see forever.

But if you go to Cortez, spend a day or two at Mesa Verde, and leave, you will have missed out on what makes this area so special. 

[Read more over at textless.tumblr.com…]

* * *

Amadee Ricketts is an At-Large Guide to the West. She’s worked as a cemetary groundskeeper, a shoeshine valet, and a bill collector. More recently, she’s been a children’s librarian in five states. She takes a lot of pictures and lives near Durango, CO. You can see her photos at textless.tumblr.com.