'ELYSIAN FIELDS' - WISCONSIN

Some of these Wisconsin vehicles outlasted the weather and ravages of time to become daily drivers. Others found their Elysian Fields, which is where heroes went after their deaths in Greek mythology.

A broke-down automobile can sometimes have the look of a fallen hero. 

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Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

DEER CAMP - WOOD COUNTY, WISCONSIN (ca. 1890)

We’ve mentioned that Wisconsin is beating everyone, right? Well, Wisconsin librarians are even MORE amazing. The eminently awesome Recollection Wisconsin sends this American Guide Week dispatch for Field Assignment #2 - Flora and Fauna:

Whitetail deer are abundant in Wisconsin, with current populations estimated at 1.5 million. Deer hunting is an annual late-autumn ritual for many Wisconsinites. Groups of hunters might retreat to “deer camps” for a week or more to test their skills and reconnect with the natural world. For others, deer hunting is a family affair; an entire extended family might spend hunting season’s opening weekend together, with plenty of time for eating, drinking, and socializing as well as the actual hunt.

Although the vast majority of Wisconsin’s 600,000+ licensed deer hunters are men, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is actively encouraging women to take part in this longstanding Wisconsin tradition. This year, the state’s nine-day gun hunting season will run from November 23-December 1. 

image source: McMillan Memorial Library, Wisconsin Rapids

Recollection Wisconsin has many, many great posts to explore on its own website. We happen to love this recent article about the history of Wisconsin department stores

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Recollection Wisconsin is a collaborative effort to bring together digital versions of Wisconsin history materials from participating libraries, archives, museums and historical societies across the state. Follow them on Tumblr at wiscohisto.tumblr.com and be sure to visit their website, recollectionwisconsin.org.

LIVING LINES - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

Milwaukee resident Kenneth Kornacki sends along this photo dispatch sketching the lines of where the city lives - windows, homes, rooflines.

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Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

IN THE FOG ON I-94 - WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS
Some parts of the U.S. look the same all over. Your Guide to the Midwest, Dan Caruso drove all night to get you this dispatch on Field Assignment #9 - Transportation:

Milwaukee to Chicago, Chicago to Milwaukee. Back and forth, back and forth. I have made the trip hundreds of times. I-94 which is one of the northernmost east/west interstates briefly re-orients in a north-south direction across the Illinois-Wisconsin state border. It creates a very direct route for travel between Milwaukee and Chicago. 
Out of all the times I have driven between the two cities, one time in particular stands out. About a year and a half ago, on a Friday night, my family and I left Chicago to head north. A thick, pea soup kind of  fog covered the whole region. Needing gas, we pulled off the highway at one of the exits for Kenosha, Wisconsin. That night standing there, isolated by the fog and the darkness, I felt like this could have been any interstate side gas station/truck stop in the United States. A country’s backbone is built upon the highways and interstates like I-94 that cross this land.  

* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
IN THE FOG ON I-94 - WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS
Some parts of the U.S. look the same all over. Your Guide to the Midwest, Dan Caruso drove all night to get you this dispatch on Field Assignment #9 - Transportation:

Milwaukee to Chicago, Chicago to Milwaukee. Back and forth, back and forth. I have made the trip hundreds of times. I-94 which is one of the northernmost east/west interstates briefly re-orients in a north-south direction across the Illinois-Wisconsin state border. It creates a very direct route for travel between Milwaukee and Chicago. 
Out of all the times I have driven between the two cities, one time in particular stands out. About a year and a half ago, on a Friday night, my family and I left Chicago to head north. A thick, pea soup kind of  fog covered the whole region. Needing gas, we pulled off the highway at one of the exits for Kenosha, Wisconsin. That night standing there, isolated by the fog and the darkness, I felt like this could have been any interstate side gas station/truck stop in the United States. A country’s backbone is built upon the highways and interstates like I-94 that cross this land.  

* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info

IN THE FOG ON I-94 - WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS

Some parts of the U.S. look the same all over. Your Guide to the Midwest, Dan Caruso drove all night to get you this dispatch on Field Assignment #9 - Transportation:

Milwaukee to Chicago, Chicago to Milwaukee. Back and forth, back and forth. I have made the trip hundreds of times. I-94 which is one of the northernmost east/west interstates briefly re-orients in a north-south direction across the Illinois-Wisconsin state border. It creates a very direct route for travel between Milwaukee and Chicago.

Out of all the times I have driven between the two cities, one time in particular stands out. About a year and a half ago, on a Friday night, my family and I left Chicago to head north. A thick, pea soup kind of  fog covered the whole region. Needing gas, we pulled off the highway at one of the exits for Kenosha, Wisconsin. That night standing there, isolated by the fog and the darkness, I felt like this could have been any interstate side gas station/truck stop in the United States. A country’s backbone is built upon the highways and interstates like I-94 that cross this land.  

* * *

Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.

PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info
PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN
For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *
Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com. 
Zoom Info

PAST PRESENT - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

For Field Assignment #10 - Products and Manufacturing/Industry, Erich Schroeder shares these stark images that speak to him of something lost in Milwaukee:

This was a small car dealership with a service department. It had been vacant for awhile, but now has a new owner. For me, the images represent not the actual business, but the ever-more prevalent state of customer service or lack thereof in the present. It is disheartening to see that pride in the workplace isn’t what it used to be.

* * *

Erich Schroeder is a Milwaukee resident and photographer who jauntily accepts all donated cameras. He appreciates a good challenge and the hard work that comes with it. Follow Erich on Tumblr at erichschroederphotography.tumblr.com and check out more of his work on his website, erichschroederphotography.com

CREAM CITY - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

Builders soon began to make use of the brick clay beds found in many parts of the state. … Along the east coast cream-colored brick was popular, especially in Milwaukee, which came to be known as the Cream City. For some decades cream brick was a common material for churches, homes, office buildings, breweries, and factories. 

Wisconsin, A Guide To the Badger State (WPA, 1941)

Ken Kornacki, your Guide to Milwaukee, tags in to American Guide Week with this image for Field Assignment #6 - Architecture.

* * *

Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

SHADOW PEOPLE - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN

…a nocturnal quiet…often produces the waggish comment, “You could fire a cannon down Wisconsin Avenue at midnight and never hit a soul!”

Wisconsin, A Guide To the Badger State (WPA, 1941) 

Milwaukee is a city of almost 600,000 people. It’s impossible to know them all and sometimes they all seem like strangers. Depending on the time of day, it seems like only a single person might walk down the street. There is a sort of hide-and-seek nature of encountering strangers in Milwaukee.

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Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.

THE CHEDDAR CURTAIN - LIFE ON THE ILLINOIS-WISCONSIN BORDER

The state line between Illinois and Wisconsin is something I cross frequently, but rarely do I consider the communities that exist on either side. People from Illinois refer to the border as the “cheddar curtain.” Growing up in Wisconsin we used an unflattering acronym when referring to those from Illinois who strayed north to the roads of “America’s Dairyland.” I’d never spent any significant amount of time around the border so I decided to zigzag across the state line and see what life was like. Promising the kids ice cream, I packed my family into the car and connected the dots from one town to to another 

Starting off, there was Antioch, IL which nestles itself around a series of lakes and is home to the company that makes the china for Air Force One and Camp David. Who knew? Then we hit Wilmot, WI, “Matterhorn of the Midwest,” with its ski hill, a place I had actually been to before with my middle school ski club. Genoa City, WI and Richmond, IL were next in line—two little towns lying across the border from each other that you may or may not notice as you drive up Hwy 12 to Lake Geneva.

There is Sharon, where we stopped for ice cream and were literally some of the only people out on the main street. Zenda, a town I could hardly find and seemed to blend into the ruralness around it. Connecting these places were country roads that range from blacktop highways to small county roads—the certain kind of midwest roads that exist in the middle of nowhere. They are as straight as an arrow and shoot through corn fields, seemingly only used by tractors and other farm implements, connecting places where families have lived for generations tending to their farms. It was the middle of nowhere for us, but somewhere for them.

I did not come to any grand conclusions as to what life is like on the border or form any new opinions about one state or the other. More importantly, my family and I spent some time off the beaten path. A place I feel like everyone should go once in awhile.  

* * *

Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.

CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info
CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
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CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 
When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.
What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.
The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.
Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.
For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.
* * *
Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.
Zoom Info

CUSTARD STANDS - MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN 

When you live in the Milwaukee area and you’re craving a frozen treat, there’s a good chance that instead of going out for ice cream you’ll  head to your local frozen custard stand.

What makes frozen custard different than ice cream? The key elements: it must contain at least 1.4% pasteurized egg yolks (for richness) in addition to the necessary 10% butterfat and, unlike ice cream, very little air is added, making it denser and creamier.

The wonderful culinary concoction known as frozen custard was created in Coney Island, New York, but found its way to the Milwaukee area via the 1933 World’s Fair in Chicago. In 1938 the first custard stand opened and ever since Milwaukeeans have embraced frozen custard as somewhat of an official dessert.

Whether you enjoy custard year-round or deprive yourself and wait for summer to indulge, it’s impossible to avoid being charmed by the culture of the three most famous custard stands in Milwaukee—Gilles, the first stand to open in Milwaukee; Leon’s, which south-siders claim as the inspiration behind Arnold’s Drive-In on the television show “Happy Days”; and Kopp’s where the “flavor of the day” concept was introduced. All define what a custard stand should be and choosing a favorite would be difficult for most people. Wisconsinites young and old flood these landmarks that have kept this dairy goodness on the forefront of the Milwaukee food scene for decades.

For me, growing up, many evenings were spent slurping up cones and sundaes at LeDuc’s Custard in Wales (WI)… an activity that continues to this day when I am back in my home state of Wisconsin.

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Dan Caruso is a Guide to Illinois and Wisconsin. He grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Chicago to get his masters degree in architecture. He currently works as a project manager for a small local architecture firm, is trying to break into real estate, and wishes he was a photographer. You can see Dan’s photographs on flickr and his tumblr page, jonnyoptimo.tumblr.com. He also likes to keep his trigger finger loose on instagram.

NATURAL SETTING: WATER - WISCONSIN

20 percent of all the fresh water on Earth is contained in the Great Lakes. Wisconsin has more than 800 miles of Great Lakes coastline, more than 15,000 lakes and 13,500 miles of navigable streams and rivers. Water is omnipresent. In late spring, the drawbridges reopen and the tour boats make their way down the Milwaukee River to Lake Michigan. In the suburbs, the creeks flow quietly until the summer storms fill them to capacity. Foggy mornings give way to sunny days and occasional rains. Water is also the birthplace and home of Wisconsin’s state bird, the mosquito.

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Ken Kornacki is a State Guide to Wisconsin. Follow him on Tumblr at aurum-design or on his website, aurum-design.com.